Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 25th Oct 2010 21:43 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Well, this was inevitable. After Samsung and Sony Ericsson abandoning Symbian for their line of smartphones, and after Symbian Foundation executive director Lee Williams leaving the company for "personal reasons", there's now a report that the Symbian Foundation is winding down its operations, in preparation for closing up shop entirely.
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RE[4]: Misleading headline
by vivainio on Tue 26th Oct 2010 18:59 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Misleading headline"
vivainio
Member since:
2008-12-26

There's been personnel changes, there is a massive shortfall in funding and it is reported that emloyees have been offered redundancy packages.


Refocusing effort that was previously split between MeeGo and Symbian (and MeeGo Touch + Orbit, respectively) to Qt Quick that spans both platforms is considered a positive thing for both MeeGo *and* Symbian.

If you think of Symbian as a way to get the Qt Quick development platform on cheaper phones with massive installed base, you've got a good head start in understanding why Symbian isn't quite as doomed as you may think.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Misleading headline
by Neolander on Wed 27th Oct 2010 05:04 in reply to "RE[4]: Misleading headline"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

If you think of Symbian as a way to get the Qt Quick development platform on cheaper phones with massive installed base, you've got a good head start in understanding why Symbian isn't quite as doomed as you may think.

Exactly. If Meego wants to compete with android, iOS, etc... it will only run properly on 600€+ hardware too.

Let's face it : most people don't want to invest that much in a phone, even if it also replaces their TV and their microwave oven. With the current distribution of money, only a few percents of the population of the Earth can afford that. Like it or not, only Symbian runs properly on mid-end phones as of today.

Moreover, meego is late, and still has to gain some interest somewhere else than in geekdom.

Symbian allows precisely that : getting good applications for Meego before it's even out, to ease its adoption.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Misleading headline
by segedunum on Wed 27th Oct 2010 13:44 in reply to "RE[4]: Misleading headline"
segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

Refocusing effort that was previously split between MeeGo and Symbian (and MeeGo Touch + Orbit, respectively) to Qt Quick that spans both platforms is considered a positive thing for both MeeGo *and* Symbian.

It's not entirely clear why Nokia needs two platforms, apart from flogging the Symbian horse to keep it going.

If you think of Symbian as a way to get the Qt Quick development platform on cheaper phones with massive installed base, you've got a good head start in understanding why Symbian isn't quite as doomed as you may think.

Sorry, but this is seriously misguided.

There is no 'installed base' of Symbian phones. The way phone turnover works is that people throw phones away and buy new ones with no reference to any applications or anything else that they ran on their old phone. This is not Windows on desktops. There's no way that Nokia is going to get an instant installed base for Qt Quick or anything else with people installing it on their existing Symbian phones. You make it sound as if that is something that will magically happen.

The problem for Nokia is that their 'installed base' really does count for nothing.

Edited 2010-10-27 13:46 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Misleading headline
by vivainio on Wed 27th Oct 2010 15:28 in reply to "RE[5]: Misleading headline"
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26

There's no way that Nokia is going to get an instant installed base for Qt Quick or anything else with people installing it on their existing Symbian phones. You make it sound as if that is something that will magically happen.


It will happen through people downloading Qt programs from Ovi store. The trick is "smart installer":

http://wiki.forum.nokia.com/index.php/Nokia_Smart_Installer_for_Sym...

It downloads Qt from Nokia servers if the application to install requires Qt. This is managed by embedding the smart installer in .sis packages, so that it works on existing device base. I don't know the number of capable phones, but I know it's huge.

Reply Parent Score: 2