Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 16th Feb 2011 23:02 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "There's just one problem, though: the 'nine young investors' don't really exist - according to the last tweet on the @NokiaPlanB Twitter account, it was all a hoax perpetuated by 'one very bored engineer who really likes his iPhone'. Ouch."
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RE[4]: I like WP7
by lucas_maximus on Thu 17th Feb 2011 13:21 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: I like WP7"
lucas_maximus
Member since:
2009-08-18

I'm glad you like it. I just don't want to get caught in a vendor-only (like Microsoft-only) environment ever again.

You that IE6 problem people talk about ? That is exactly the same problem. I'm Not interrested.

The game with Microsoft and others is called vendor lockin, I'm not playing.


IE6 gained soo much market share because there wasn't a better free alternative at the time. Mozilla Suit sucked and didn't work properly, NetScape was slower. It wasn't until 3 years after IE6's release that a better browser for nothing turned up.

It doesn't matter what platform you develop on you will be locked into that platform in some way. Write for QT, you end up being locked into QT in some way, if you write your software in PHP you will be locked into PHP (facebook is an example of this and they had to develop HipHop to solve performance issues).

So my software is locked into the .NET platform which has been backwards compatible for the last 7 years and is going to remain like for the foreseeable future ... I don't see that as a big deal personally.

Edited 2011-02-17 13:24 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[5]: I like WP7
by Radio on Thu 17th Feb 2011 13:47 in reply to "RE[4]: I like WP7"
Radio Member since:
2009-06-20

There is technologic lock-in: you have to make choices because you cannot do everything (such as have code run everywhere without modification).

And then there is vendor lock-in, where the owner abuses his position. One such example is Apple changing the (vague) rules of their app store at whim; another one is... Microsoft banning GPL from their app store:
http://i.imgur.com/fQraD.png

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: I like WP7
by lucas_maximus on Thu 17th Feb 2011 21:41 in reply to "RE[5]: I like WP7"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Vendor Lock in or Tech lock in .... does it really matter which?

I have had tech lock-in on (DEAD) Opensource projects that have been as problematic as vendor lock-in with a proprietry CMS. I am one man out of a team of two ... I can't spend time reading the source ... I need docs ... if there are no docs ... I am in a world of hurt.

The best you can do is try to separate you application logic out well and document it well enough that if you need to change platforms you can reimplement without too much effort.

I have done this with some of my applications I have written, I migrated a web service and web app from ASP.NET MVC / SQL Server to Ruby/PostGres without any hassle at all. (Work wanted the .NET version, I wanted to produce for myself a OS agnostic version). The only problem was reimplementing when I had used LINQ ... which looks like an SQL query anyway.

.Net isn't going anywhere for at least 2020, and work pay for my copy of Windows and Visual Studio. So what have I got to lose from staying with .NET exactly??

The thing is that we are in the best position ever as a dev whatever platform you choose. We have an easy way of communicating (JSON, XML and it variants) which is supported by every major programming language. Every major smart phone and operating system have very capable browsers ... we have frameworks with good IDE's (whatever language), which are usually ported to other languages.

And yet people of talking about vendor lock-in ... WTF?? Separate your logic and Document your code and just reimplement (which you would have to do if another Opensource framework, iOS, WP7, Android, WebOS etc etc dissapeared off the face of the Earth tomorrow).

I really don't see what all the fuss is about.

I have problems with things such as flash, since they are essentially polluting a OS agnostic medium (the web) with something that is tied to which OS you are using.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: I like WP7
by ichi on Thu 17th Feb 2011 14:29 in reply to "RE[4]: I like WP7"
ichi Member since:
2007-03-06

It doesn't matter what platform you develop on you will be locked into that platform in some way. Write for QT, you end up being locked into QT in some way, if you write your software in PHP you will be locked into PHP (facebook is an example of this and they had to develop HipHop to solve performance issues).


Yep, but .Net is tied to the Windows platform while Qt (or PHP for that matter) is not. You don't get just tied to the framework (which is to be expected since you get used to it, learn it's quirks and build your workflow around it) but to an OS that happens to be developed by the very same dev of the framework.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: I like WP7
by nt_jerkface on Thu 17th Feb 2011 16:59 in reply to "RE[5]: I like WP7"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

With Qt you get locked into a development team whose future funding is questionable.

And if you think the community can do as much as a sponsored team....no. Qt has excelled past GTK because it has a team of paid developers. Without funding it would stagnate.

Qt also has a few remaining issues with native integration in Windows and OSX that need to be worked out. If funding stays at current levels in a few years you will see a lot more interest from Windows developers.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[6]: I like WP7
by lucas_maximus on Thu 17th Feb 2011 22:08 in reply to "RE[5]: I like WP7"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

You don't get just tied to the framework (which is to be expected since you get used to it, learn it's quirks and build your workflow around it) but to an OS that happens to be developed by the very same dev of the framework.


You do this in any language and OS ... I work very differently when I was working using a Linux with the LAMP stack, to using Windows with Appserv (WAMP basically) installed. With Linux I very much relied on using VIM in a terminal ... and in Windows I used editplus and graphical mysql client.

It is a non-issue. A good dev is always a good dev ... the best Dev I knew sat one of Designers computer and didn't know anything about Flash and its scripting ... and within half and hour had solved the problem and finished the website for the designer.

Similarly every friday I get called from email marketing ... I know nothing about their email campaign software or how to do HTML emails ... however using my existing web dev skills I was able to solve their problem ... in about 10 minutes, it is usually dreamweaver putting in crap markup.

Visual Studio's and .NET benefits far outweight the fact that it is Windows only ... it is nice being here, I can develop with ease for Web, Desktop, Phone, Xbox and some embedded devices (like netduino) without having to spend a lot of time learning new concepts ... If the worst comes to the worst ... I have good OO skills and database skills and I can transition if the job market in my area changes.

I am not against other frameworks, languages etc ... they all bring ideas to the table and generally get absorbed into other frameworks and languages ... i.e. ASP.NET MVC is basically Ruby on Rails ... I love it ... I cringe when Writing ASP.NET web forms.

I am not against other OSes (I buy my OpenBSD CDs and T-shirts etc, I also have a paid for copy of Redhat 9) ... what I don't like is people not looking realistically and pragmatically at a platform/framework/language/hardware.

My personal website is LAMP based because that was the cheapest hosting and I only needed 4 pages with realtively simple scripting ...

My price comparison site I am building is a ASP.NET webforms beast ... with a WCF webservice ... because I have good debugging in VS and I knew Webforms when I started writing it.

Reply Parent Score: 2