Linked by David Adams on Sun 8th May 2011 04:15 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems Well-known game developer David Braben is a little bit fed up with the state of computer science education these days, which seems to have shifted away from learning programming to some sort of computer-oriented "life skills" class. As the father of eleven and nine year-old boys, I can attest that so far, despite a massive investment on the part of their school in computer equipment, their computer education has consisted mostly of "play this math game" and "don't be victimized by cyber-perverts." Braben's idea to stem this tide: a very, very cheap computer that students can learn to program on.
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RE: Scope
by Neolander on Sun 8th May 2011 10:49 UTC in reply to "Scope"
Neolander
Member since:
2010-03-08

I disagree. Programming is a general topic, at least a part of it. Learning how to program when I was younger taught me the basic scientific workflow of our days (start from a problem, analyze it, slice it in tiny bits, work on those bits, put the pieces together), which in turn was very useful knowledge later. Computer are stupid machines, programming them involves putting vague, abstract thoughts in a precise form. And that knowledge is very useful.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Scope
by WereCatf on Sun 8th May 2011 11:01 in reply to "RE: Scope"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

I disagree. Programming is a general topic, at least a part of it. Learning how to program when I was younger taught me the basic scientific workflow of our days (start from a problem, analyze it, slice it in tiny bits, work on those bits, put the pieces together), which in turn was very useful knowledge later. Computer are stupid machines, programming them involves putting vague, abstract thoughts in a precise form. And that knowledge is very useful.


I agree. Programming itself might not be such a useful talent for many people, but learning how to handle complex problems and the workflow of picking a problem apart and putting it back together is always useful, no matter what field you're going to take in the future. And for learning that programming is a very logical choice, there's not many other fields where one can be taught such as easily.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: Scope
by Thom_Holwerda on Sun 8th May 2011 11:07 in reply to "RE[2]: Scope"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

I would've loved it if programming had been part of my education. I went to a rather prestigious high school, but we had none of that. I always wondered why nobody ever developed an education programme for teaching kids programming, starting in primary school, and carrying over into high school. I mean, I started learning English when I was 8 - basic courses programming could tie math in with language.

God knows how many excellent programmers never get to know they're excellent programmers simply because our education system doesn't cater to them.

Reply Parent Score: 3