Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 11th May 2011 21:53 UTC, submitted by kragil
Graphics, User Interfaces "Pinta, a 'lightweight' open source raster image editor, turned 1.0 on April 27, offering Linux users another choice for simple image editing. Pinta is intended to be a clone of Paint.NET, the Windows-only raster editor written in .NET. As such, it uses Mono under the hood, but it gains the ability to run equally well on Linux, Mac OS X, or Windows. Is it a replacement for GIMP or Krita? That depends on what you need to do." What I like about Pinta is that I actually caused its creation in the first place.
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RE[7]: Comment by orestes
by DeadFishMan on Fri 13th May 2011 16:46 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by orestes"
DeadFishMan
Member since:
2006-01-09

Right... yes, if all that was involved with Comic Creation was drawing, Krita would be a useful tool. But that misses pretty much all of the functionality I use in Manga Studio. I draw by hand (usually pencil, sometimes also ink... how very last century of me!), Scan, digitally ink (if I didn't already ink by hand) then Screentone (doesn't do this - if you think it does, you don't understand what that means), add any effects (doesn't do this) and add speech bubbles (doesn't do this either.) So, at best it does less than half of what I need, plus if I drew everything manually, it actually then does zero. This is then completely ignoring the other things it does, such as panelling and page management.

Screen toning aside, I don't really see much of an argument as to why Manga Studio is SO superior to either GIMP or Paint.NET. And yes, I also produce digital content occasionally - used to draw on a daily basis a few years ago, not so much today - so I am not talking out of my ass.

Manga Studio is a very nice application, yes, whose interface is primarily directed to those that want to create comics that look like manga, hence the effects, speed lines, speech bubbles, etc. but unsurprisingly it is not as used on professional environments as you are seemingly implying to be.

Most professional comic books are usually drawn on paper and inked manually to be scanned and then colored/tweaked/etc on Photoshop (although many creators are increasingly doing the entire workflow digitally these days). Dialogs are usually put either directly on Photoshop or using a vector app such as Illustrator (which is much better at rearranging speech bubbles than any raster app anyway!). Speed lines and other effects can be created easily on Photoshop. Laying out a page is also easily done on these tools so I fail to see what Manga Studio has that put it a cut above most of those other tools.

Moreover, you sound like someone too dependent on his tools to produce his artwork. Tools will only take you so far. I've seen so much impressive artwork done with GIMP, MyPaint, Krita, Blender and Inkscape that blows a lot of art "professionally done with professional tools" out of the water. DeviantArt is shock full of examples if you don't believe me and some of these artists show their workflow on time lapsed videos on YouTube as well.

I've done some good looking stuff on Blender, GIMP and Inkscape as well and I can attest that while not perfect - what is? - these tools are more than capable of assisting one to produce all kinds of digital artwork.

On the subject of Paint.NET, I think it is a very overrated application. It is a great application and its UI is well done (unsurprisingly as it takes cues from a lot of older photo retouching apps including Photoshop itself) but it left me wanting. I tried to use it exclusively for a little while when on Windows, but it doesn't have a third of GIMP features so I asked myself what's the point? Sure it looks nice, but I need something that works! The way I see it, Paint.NET is somewhere in the middle of KolourPaint and GIMP/Krita feature-wise. Not bad, but it cannot be compared to GIMP on any other grounds other than its UI.

Edited 2011-05-13 16:57 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: Comment by orestes
by henderson101 on Mon 16th May 2011 10:01 in reply to "RE[7]: Comment by orestes"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

Firstly, this is all about MY workflow, not a general digital artish's workflow, so you're already missing the point. Yet, I'll respond all the same.

Screen toning aside, I don't really see much of an argument as to why Manga Studio is SO superior to either GIMP or Paint.NET.


It's superior because it was designed to be used for the specific job. GIMP and Paint.Net are image editors. Image editing is part of the process. But there's way, way more to it than that.

And yes, I also produce digital content occasionally - used to draw on a daily basis a few years ago, not so much today - so I am not talking out of my ass.


Cool. I'm glad you are more aware of the issues.

Manga Studio is a very nice application, yes, whose interface is primarily directed to those that want to create comics that look like manga,


No, it's a general comic editor. In fact, that it's called "Manga Studio" is more marketing than anything else. In Japan it's called "Comic Studio". Up till version 4, it excelled at monotone and grey-scaled images, but version 4 added full colour. Indeed, Dave Gibbons uses it - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cu1FBjCqxew


hence the effects, speed lines,


Which are not used as much in western comics, true....

speech bubbles,


which are pretty damn essential and universal when creating a comic book.

but unsurprisingly it is not as used on professional environments as you are seemingly implying to be.


Depends who you are talking about really. It's used extensively in Eastern style comicbooks (Manga, Manhwa, Man hua.) Outside of the eastern style, it's used a lot more than GIMP and Paint.Net, but Photoshop and Illustrator and likely used more in the west.

Most professional comic books are usually drawn on paper and inked manually to be scanned and then colored/tweaked/etc on Photoshop (although many creators are increasingly doing the entire workflow digitally these days).


You are talking to someone who has already told you that is they way they work too.... However, the latter is way, way more common these days. Mostly, pencils are digitally inked using a plug-ins that remove the manual digital inking process, but some still manually ink using tablets.

Dialogs are usually put either directly on Photoshop or using a vector app such as Illustrator (which is much better at rearranging speech bubbles than any raster app anyway!).


I can tell you haven't used Manga Studio by that statement. Every speech bubble (what you call dialogue) is in its own little layer and moving it is absolutely just a care of dragging and they are NOT raster (as the product can have mixed layers that raster or non raster.) Bonus - the dialogue resizes as you type and the font is resized and styled. There's no way that Illustrator beats that. I've done it that way and it was painful.

Speed lines and other effects can be created easily on Photoshop. Laying out a page is also easily done on these tools so I fail to see what Manga Studio has that put it a cut above most of those other tools.


For me, project management. Each chapter opens as a project and I can see each of the facing pages in print layout ordering. Also, Panelling with full bleed areas that are auto masked:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qwMC20UvM0k

There you go. That is one big reason "why" it is better for me. It just does everything you would use 2 or three other packages for in a single tool. That's it really. It's purely designed to make life easier, but everyone has their own "thing" and if you prefer a more manual process, cool.

Moreover, you sound like someone too dependent on his tools to produce his artwork. Tools will only take you so far.


No, and you are putting words in to my mouth. 90% of the time I draw and ink by hand (I Pencil approx 20 pages a week, then ink and finish in Manga Studio those pages every fortnight, how many do you complete these days?) These are all for a Doushinji, but even if I was a pro, I would have a similar toolset and work ethic (probably higher output too.) I use Manga Studio because the hardest part is "finishing" the pages. Drawing is easy. Given "simple and easy" vs "what the industry uses", I know which way I lean.

I've seen so much impressive artwork done with GIMP, MyPaint, Krita, Blender and Inkscape that blows a lot of art "professionally done with professional tools" out of the water.


Sure, but talent shines through no matter what. I tend to work on cheap copier paper rather than expensive "comic paper" and with HB pencils that cost £0.19 for 20 because really, the tools are only tools. However, when I manually Ink, I Ink with pro level dip pens and ink because I find that works best for me. Really you sound like a good guy picking a fight with the wrong person.

I've done some good looking stuff on Blender, GIMP and Inkscape as well and I can attest that while not perfect - what is? - these tools are more than capable of assisting one to produce all kinds of digital artwork.


Honestly dude, you've gone off on a tangent. I was asking Lemur to offer his advice as he seems to have an opinion of pretty much everything. He offered Krita, I said, no - no good for >me<. You seem now to have taken that my workflow is one of general art. No. I'm a digital comic book artist. All I care about is making digital comic books. I don't care about making general art. Not my bag. I don't care if you have used other tools, the point was not that other tools are capable of creating general art, it was that I asked Lemur to find an alternative to a very, very specific use case. If you don't understand that, you really shouldn't reply to this thread.

On the subject of Paint.NET, I think it is a very overrated application.


Sigh. Missed the point.

Reply Parent Score: 2