Linked by snydeq on Fri 12th Aug 2011 03:55 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes InfoWorld's Galen Gruman highlights 18 technologies that remain core to the computing experience for IT, engineers, and developers 25 to 50 years since their inception. From Cobol, to the IBM mainframe, to C, to x86, these high-tech senior citizens not only keep kicking but provide the foundations for many vital systems that keep IT humming.
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RE[2]: Infoworld
by spiderman on Fri 12th Aug 2011 09:41 UTC in reply to "RE: Infoworld"
spiderman
Member since:
2008-10-23

Thanks for that.


12. Gnu: 1983
Richard Stallman, who later formed the Free Software Foundation, didn't like the notion of software being controlled by corporations, so he set out to produce a free version of AT&T's Unix based on the principles espoused in his book "The Gnu Manifesto." The result was Gnu, an incomplete copy that languished until Linus Torvalds incorporated much of it in 1991 into the Linux operating system, which today powers so many servers.
Omfg!
So Linus Torvalds incorporated GNU into its Linux operating system?

That is another reason why I don't click on Infoworld links. They write complete crap.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Infoworld
by Kebabbert on Fri 12th Aug 2011 11:30 in reply to "RE[2]: Infoworld"
Kebabbert Member since:
2007-07-27

So Linus Torvalds incorporated GNU into its Linux operating system?

That is another reason why I don't click on Infoworld links. They write complete crap.

Yes, that is questionable. It would be better to say that Linus Torvalds created the first GNU distro. Earlier, there were no kernel for the GNU operating system - so the finish student Linus Torvalds filled in that gap and created the first GNU distro. Then other GNU/Linux distros spawned, of course.



Regarding IBM Mainframes, it always surprises me that they still live, as the IBM Mainframe cpus are much slower than a fast x86 cpu. And the biggest IBM Mainframe z196 have 24 of these slow cpus, and it costs many 10s of million USD. If you have a 8-socket x86 server with Intel Westemere-EX then you have more processing power than the biggest z196 IBM Mainframe. You can emulate IBM Mainframes on you laptop with the open source emulator TurboHercules.

Here is the z196 cpu, which IBM dubbed "Worlds fastest cpu" last year. It has 5.26GHz and almost half a GB of cache (L1+L2+L3), but still it is much slower than a fast x86 cpu. How could IBM fail so miserably with the z196 transistor budget?
http://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/pressrelease/32414.wss



And the old COBOL. It's not particularly sexy or hot. It is boring and ugly, only used on old dinosaurs (i.e Mainframes).

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: Infoworld
by broken_symlink on Fri 12th Aug 2011 12:24 in reply to "RE[3]: Infoworld"
broken_symlink Member since:
2005-07-06


And the old COBOL. It's not particularly sexy or hot. It is boring and ugly, only used on old dinosaurs (i.e Mainframes).


Thats why there are tons of cobol jobs available right now.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: Infoworld
by zima on Fri 12th Aug 2011 12:25 in reply to "RE[3]: Infoworld"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Mainframes are supposedly about throughput of many concurrent transactions, I/O; lots of stuff is offloaded to coprocessors. Central Processing Unit seems to have slightly different meaning in them (mainframes don't really seem to be strictly about raw CPU crunching)

Then there are claims about reliability, on-line repairs and upgrades, verifiability (they seem to basically do everything two times and compare the results, at minimum? That ought to slow things down), or security (apparently stemming from few choices about overall architecture of the machines; also can't help, at the least, with raw CPU number crunching)

Edited 2011-08-12 12:35 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

Power 7 slower than an X86?
by shotsman on Fri 12th Aug 2011 18:31 in reply to "RE[3]: Infoworld"
shotsman Member since:
2005-07-22

Well, my unscientific benchmarks beg to differ.
Our AIX System moves data around at a rate that Intel can only dream about.
Our workloads (using the same software) run getting on for an order of magnitude better on a twin Power 7 core than on the latest i7 based server.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: Infoworld
by SilConGeeky on Fri 12th Aug 2011 21:10 in reply to "RE[3]: Infoworld"
SilConGeeky Member since:
2011-08-01

Not only the HW but the Software as well. Solid as a rock and very little risk of going down.

I did an implementation from IBM ERP to then Oracle on Sun platform. Needless to say there were 100s of bugs in Oracle. That was some time ago. What a nightmare...

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Infoworld
by Drumhellar on Sat 13th Aug 2011 01:19 in reply to "RE[3]: Infoworld"
Drumhellar Member since:
2005-07-12

Well, you can't really disassemble that Intel server and move it to another location without taking it offline. With IBM's mainframes, you can do just that, a piece at at time, with mere seconds of downtime.

Reply Parent Score: 5