Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 14th Sep 2011 22:20 UTC
Windows This is mandatory listening and watching material for understanding the design methodology and ideas behind the Metro interface in Windows 8 (and thus, Windows Phone 7). All this sounds great in theory, and Jensen Harris, one of the minds behind Metro, is clearly passionate about it - and I love people who are passionate about their work. It's just that to me, the Metro UI doesn't seem to work very well for actual work. I want window management! I'm taking all this into account for an article on Metro in the Developer Preview. Stay tuned.
Thread beginning with comment 489703
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
galvanash
Member since:
2006-01-25

Yes, it is 17 years old. But it was a quite thorough stud so it is cited often. If I find something more current I will happily post it, but the age of the study doesn't really change the point much.

The people in this study are now in their 40s... These are the people currently running the world so to speak. They are not "old" - they are simply middle aged adults.

Yes, I would completely agree with anyone saying that this problem has lessened somewhat over time. People who grow up with computers are much more likely to feel comfortable with using them. But that isn't the whole story - while the younger generation is much less likely to fear technology they are also much less likely to spend a great deal of time learning the details.

People who were kids in the 80s had the benefit of growing up WITH home computers - they were devices that fascinated and frightened adults and were therefore very intriguing to children. Anything your parents don't understand is tempting for a child...

That is no longer the case - kids grow up with parents that use them. They are not fascinating anymore, they are simply a reality now - the thrill is gone. Kids just want to use them to get things done, to play a game, or to chat with their friends. If you want to build devices that these people WANT to use you have to change with the times.

Reply Parent Score: 2

treborky Member since:
2011-09-15

..., but the age of the study doesn't really change the point much.

In fact, the age of the study completely changes the point. Your point was that a lot of people are scared of computers. What you actually showed was that between 1992 - 1994 a lot of people were scared of computers. Your statement was about here and now but the data you provided was from 17 years ago. How about we use data from the 1920's to make statements about here and now ? Still think age of the study doesn't make a difference ?

...while the younger generation is much less likely to fear technology they are also much less likely to spend a great deal of time learning the details.

Either add "In my opinion" to the start of this sentence or provide a source.

Reply Parent Score: 1

galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

In fact, the age of the study completely changes the point. Your point was that a lot of people are scared of computers. What you actually showed was that between 1992 - 1994 a lot of people were scared of computers. Your statement was about here and now but the data you provided was from 17 years ago. How about we use data from the 1920's to make statements about here and now ? Still think age of the study doesn't make a difference ?


I get what you are saying, but that is the latest study I could find with details - and frankly 17 years is not that long for this kind of targeted study (they don't do studies like this very often on this scale). There are lots of random percentages thrown around on the intertubes from various studies, but the one I quoted has details (it is linked from the wikipedia article).

I would add, however, that even the random "in a recent XXX study on technophobia" you might find on Google, I rarely see a number less than 30% for the US - but since I don't know the details of how the study was done it doesn't mean much to me.

Regardless, that is how statistics works... You work with the latest data you have. If you have any data that would counter mine be my guest and post it. I don't have any doubt that technophobia has gone done some, but significantly? I seriously doubt it. But be my guest and post what you find.



"...while the younger generation is much less likely to fear technology they are also much less likely to spend a great deal of time learning the details.


Either add "In my opinion" to the start of this sentence or provide a source.
"

Since this is a public forum, and I am writing under an alias, maybe you should assume that everything written here is opinion unless qualified otherwise. I do not feel like starting off every sentence I write with "In my opinion" - so when I write something that is NOT opinion I will say so.

Reply Parent Score: 2