Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 21st Sep 2011 22:06 UTC, submitted by kragil
Windows After the walled garden coming to the desktop operating system world, we're currently witnessing another potential nail in the coffin of the relatively open world of desktop and laptop computing. Microsoft has revealed [.pptx] that as part of its Windows 8 logo program, OEMs must implement UEFI secure boot. This could potentially complicate the installation of other operating systems, like Windows 7, XP, and Linux.
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RE[5]: Option to Disable
by lucas_maximus on Thu 22nd Sep 2011 12:53 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Option to Disable"
lucas_maximus
Member since:
2009-08-18

Punishment negotiation is normal even for Criminal Law,

http://www.hse.gov.uk/enforce/enforcementguide/court/sentencing-hea...

Luckily I don't live in draconian countries where things are decided willy nilly.

And they were still punished ...

If you guys don't like it I suggest that you actually contact your representatives, rather than inform me (who can't do anything about) that you don't think it was insufficient.

Also IE didn't actually need to bundle IE4 to destroy netscape ... http://news.cnet.com/2100-1001-203884.html
1 million downloads of IE4 in 4 days (3rd October 1997 is a Friday, the article says the release was on the previous Tuesday).

The EU also made them produce a version of Windows XP that didn't bundle Media player (that nobody purchased) and the browser screen ballot screen, that Opera cried and screamed about to get the IE symbol removed and hardly anyone outside of Germany use Opera.

Anyway,

Secure boot is going to have to be optional because there are still lots of PCs capable of running Windows 8 that are still using BIOS. So I am pretty sure dual booting will still be an option in the future.

Also why would people buy a Windows 8 Certified machine to run Linux/OpenBSD/Android etc. on it? Sounds a bit silly to me.

Also what is there to stop someone booting linux using the Windows Bootloader (which I have done since Win2k)?

Edited 2011-09-22 13:09 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Option to Disable
by judgen on Thu 22nd Sep 2011 18:30 in reply to "RE[5]: Option to Disable"
judgen Member since:
2006-07-12

"The EU also made them produce a version of Windows XP that didn't bundle Media player (that nobody purchased) and the browser screen ballot screen, that Opera cried and screamed about to get the IE symbol removed and hardly anyone outside of Germany use Opera."

Two misstakes there 1. The version of windows you are refering to was actually A LOT more expensive than the "real" deal over here atleast and also not available for purchase almost anywhere.
2. Opera is widely used in the eastern bloc (former warsaw pact countries) for example check browser statistics for Opera in Ukraine where it is installed by default on most government computers and is very popular in gernel usage due to the "low bandwidth" mode that Opera has available.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[7]: Option to Disable
by lucas_maximus on Thu 22nd Sep 2011 19:03 in reply to "RE[6]: Option to Disable"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Two misstakes there 1. The version of windows you are refering to was actually A LOT more expensive than the "real" deal over here atleast and also not available for purchase almost anywhere.


I remember it being exactly the same price for XP ... however I could be wrong (not the first time).

I did however looked at the Windows 7 N version ... and the prices are more or less the same according to results on google shopping.

So at least now it seems they are the in the same price range.

Personally though nobody has done anything about iTunes and iPods/iPhones ... but the EU felt it needed to do something about Windows Media player?

2. Opera is widely used in the eastern bloc (former warsaw pact countries) for example check browser statistics for Opera in Ukraine where it is installed by default on most government computers and is very popular in gernel usage due to the "low bandwidth" mode that Opera has available.


I appreciate that ... but globally that isn't the case.

I know it is popular in the Ukraine ... my Girl's home country.

My main point is that Globally it didn't really help any browser to gain anything IMO .. TBH it just confused normal users (such as my stepmother and father) who were perfectly happy using IE (I had a phone call while at work and had to google what the hell it was about).

I work with devs most of the day ... and the most used browser (outside of my team) is IE. We have Oracle, SAP devs, Network and Server teams ... and only the web team use browsers that aren't IE.

Even the Electronic Media department are quite happy using IE even though anyone in our company can install any browser they wish (admin permissions are quite lax ... won't be after Win7 rollout). Most of them have Firefox and Chrome installed but just use IE ...

The thing that gets me is the constant Microsoft Bashing by people who don't really have a clue IMO.

Edited 2011-09-22 19:09 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Option to Disable
by Thomas2005 on Fri 23rd Sep 2011 14:56 in reply to "RE[5]: Option to Disable"
Thomas2005 Member since:
2005-11-07

Also why would people buy a Windows 8 Certified machine to run Linux/OpenBSD/Android etc. on it? Sounds a bit silly to me.

Also what is there to stop someone booting linux using the Windows Bootloader (which I have done since Win2k)?

People will not buy a "Windows 8 Certified" machine to run Linux/*BSD/Android/etc on, but people will buy a computer that meets their wants/needs that is in their price range that happens to be "Windows 8 Certified". Just as not everyone likes to tinker with open-source OS/apps, not everyone that tinkers with open-source OS/apps likes to tinker with hardware.

As far as using the Windows boot-loader, it could get replaced with one that checks for "properly" signed code.

Reply Parent Score: 2