Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 31st Oct 2011 23:17 UTC
Apple While it's just a rumour, this shouldn't come as a surprise to anyone who hasn't been living under a rock the past five years, and in all honesty, I'm pretty sure it's actually true. AppleInsider is reporting that Apple is contemplating axing its iconic Mac Pro.
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Premium?
by JPowers27 on Tue 1st Nov 2011 01:11 UTC
JPowers27
Member since:
2008-07-30

Mac Pro 12 core 2.66GHz is $400 more then a Dell PowerEdge T410.

To save money, I'd get the Mac Pro with base memory and then upgrade it 3rd party; that may make the pricing closer (the pricing I was using was 12G (standard on the Dell) and the Mac comes with 6G and Apple's memory is always overpriced).

The above comparison was using equal equipment from each vendor; however, I couldn't find any documentation on what video card the Dell was using. And I included MS Windows which is $825.00 (Small Business 2011); on a side note Windows Server 2008 is $3000.00 which is just about the same price a the computer. SUSE pre-installed is $279. Dell only sales Red Hat pre-installed if you take a year's maintenance at $869.00.

You could always order the Dell with no OS and then install one of the Linuxes for free with no support.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Premium?
by Morgan on Tue 1st Nov 2011 03:34 in reply to "Premium?"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

Mac Pro 12 core 2.66GHz is $400 more then a Dell PowerEdge T410....


Came here to say something similar. I've seen repeatedly over the years that the PowerMac/Mac Pro line really is a good long term investment for someone needing a workstation at that level of quality and power. Sure, anyone can slap together a quad core i7 tower with off the shelf parts these days but they are their own support, and they have to buy the OS separately. For the target audience, I think the Apple Pro machines are a great investment. Less time diagnosing one's own workstation quirks is more time spent getting work done.

You could always order the Dell with no OS and then install one of the Linuxes for free with no support.


That is indeed a great idea, but again you would run into the support issue on the OS side of things. Of course, you can go the easy route and install Ubuntu LTS too.

As for whether Apple really will kill off the Pro...I don't know. As another poster mentioned, there will always have to be some sort of development platform for iOS and OS X, even when the merging of the two is complete. I simply can't imagine trying to write operating system components on an iPad.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Premium?
by No it isnt on Tue 1st Nov 2011 12:15 in reply to "RE: Premium?"
No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

The Mac Pro line is a good investment for people who need that exact kind of workstation. The problem is, when you just need something slightly more powerful and expandable than an iMac, you can get it for less than half the cost ... of an iMac. Unless you pretend you need exactly what Apple is selling, you can get it cheaper elsewhere.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Premium?
by JAlexoid on Tue 1st Nov 2011 13:35 in reply to "RE: Premium?"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Sure, anyone can slap together a quad core i7 tower with off the shelf parts these days but they are their own support, and they have to buy the OS separately. For the target audience, I think the Apple Pro machines are a great investment.


A) You do know that you can get pretty much the same support options as Apple offers from your local geek shop that will assemble the hardware for you, don't you? Or you can assemble it yourself and you still have the warranty for components. I've been doing both for many years. If anything breaks I just take back the whole machine or the broken part.

B) The target audience has knowledge and time to build and support their own hardware builds. That is the main problem for Mac Pro - it offers nothing more than aesthetics and , maybe, some internal airflow optimisations.


That is indeed a great idea, but again you would run into the support issue on the OS side of things. Of course, you can go the easy route and install Ubuntu LTS too.


You can buy Ubuntu support if you wish. And desktop hardware rarely doesn't work with Linux these days. Desktop hardware mostly is very standard compliant(without some tuning for power and efficiency). Optionally, when building your own machine Windows comes at OEM pricing.

Reply Parent Score: 2