Linked by lemur2 on Tue 8th Nov 2011 22:40 UTC
Mozilla & Gecko clones Mozilla has announced the release of Firefox 8 for Windows, Mac, Linux and Firefox for Android. This release appears to be a relatively minor update. Perhaps the main feature of this update is the ability for user control over third-party addons. "At Mozilla, we think you should be in control, so we are disabling add-ons installed by third parties without your permission and letting you pick the ones you want to keep." A detailed technical description of this new Firefox release can be found in the release notes.
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RE[4]: When
by arbour42 on Wed 9th Nov 2011 16:43 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: When"
arbour42
Member since:
2005-07-06

Version numbers are extremely important, especially for developers. How do you know which javascript function isn't working in which browser version? Why does this add-on work in Firefox 6, but not in Firefox (n+3) which came out 4 months later?

Do I need to test my javascript in Firefox 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and Chrome 10, 11, 12, 13, 14? To cover all versions released in the last 6 months?

I'm sick of all of it. In a corporate environment, you want slow, measured version number changes. You can't just keep upgrading for the sake of upgrading every 6 weeks.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: When
by aaronb on Wed 9th Nov 2011 17:37 in reply to "RE[4]: When"
aaronb Member since:
2005-07-06

There should be a long term support version of firefox next year. For now, is it possible for you to stay with Firefox 3.6 until it nears the end of support and then go with long term support versions?

https://wiki.mozilla.org/Enterprise/Firefox/ExtendedSupport:Proposal

I am not a fan of the new version numbering, however, in my experience the quality of firefox has increased quickly in recent months.

Edited 2011-11-09 17:41 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: When
by ilovebeer on Thu 10th Nov 2011 03:13 in reply to "RE[4]: When"
ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

Version numbers are extremely important, especially for developers. How do you know which javascript function isn't working in which browser version? Why does this add-on work in Firefox 6, but not in Firefox (n+3) which came out 4 months later?

Do I need to test my javascript in Firefox 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and Chrome 10, 11, 12, 13, 14? To cover all versions released in the last 6 months?

I'm sick of all of it. In a corporate environment, you want slow, measured version number changes. You can't just keep upgrading for the sake of upgrading every 6 weeks.

Version numbers are not important but what is is what changes have occurred. Long, slow version changes are especially good for people who are too lazy to pay attention to the changelog.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[5]: When
by Fergy on Fri 11th Nov 2011 20:15 in reply to "RE[4]: When"
Fergy Member since:
2006-04-10

Do I need to test my javascript in Firefox 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and Chrome 10, 11, 12, 13, 14? To cover all versions released in the last 6 months?

Shouldn't you just test for the feature? Either give a warning if the browser doesn't support the feature or have a backup feature that simulates the behavior with older techniques. I am not a webdeveloper so correct me if I'm wrong.

Reply Parent Score: 2