Linked by evilsjg on Wed 16th Nov 2011 00:17 UTC
BSD and Darwin derivatives The DragonFly BSD project has recently decided to hold off on the 2.12 release to address a couple of long-standing issues. Some of the disruptive work done to address these issues has also resulted in the MP Token (giant kernel lock) and other major contention points being finally pushed out of the way of all critical paths. The result?
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What I'd really like
by rimzi on Wed 16th Nov 2011 16:41 UTC
rimzi
Member since:
2009-12-17

Is the up to date feature comparison of all the BSDs, maybe even vs current Linux.


I use Linux almost all the time. It always got me wondering what the BSD has to offer.

Tightly-integrated system perhaps? But what that really means..?

Reply Score: 1

RE: What I'd really like
by kenji on Wed 16th Nov 2011 21:09 in reply to "What I'd really like"
kenji Member since:
2009-04-08

Is the up to date feature comparison of all the BSDs, maybe even vs current Linux.


I use Linux almost all the time. It always got me wondering what the BSD has to offer.

Tightly-integrated system perhaps? But what that really means..?

This is a little light on info but it's a start:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_BSD_operating_systems

BSD is a more tightly integrated system, in fact Linux is not even an OS in the strictest definition. BSD separates the core OS and the user land software which isn't something that the end user notices but it simplifies administration.

For instance, you can upgrade FreeBSD while not upgrading the user (add-on) software. I think that only Slackware is capable of this in the linux world (correct me if I am wrong). Reversely, you can keep the user software up to date without requiring an OS upgrade.

Anyway there is a ton of information out there on comparing Linux and BSD

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: What I'd really like
by reez on Thu 17th Nov 2011 11:14 in reply to "RE: What I'd really like"
reez Member since:
2006-06-28

But there is a problem with Wikipedia's feature comparison. They don't show you how stable stuff it, whether someone maintains the code, how complete a feature is, how well it is integrated, ...

So really, you should have a look on what you need/expect and have a look on your own.

It also doesn't say anything about individual, unique tools/features that can make your life easier, make things like development or setting up a system easier. For example DragonFly and OpenBSD IMHO have great default configurations and lots of stuff that you can use in daily life. These things on the other hand aren't really useful when you depend a lot on third party stuff, since others are usually not aware of these things or don't care to use them in their software, because there is only one system supporting it.

Reply Parent Score: 3