Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 19th Feb 2012 11:40 UTC
Multimedia, AV VLC 2.0 has been released. "With faster decoding on multi-core, GPU, and mobile hardware and the ability to open more formats, notably professional, HD and 10bits codecs, 2.0 is a major upgrade for VLC. Twoflower has a new rendering pipeline for video, with higher quality subtitles, and new video filters to enhance your videos. It supports many new devices and BluRay Discs (experimental). Completely reworked Mac and Web interfaces and improvements in the other interfaces make VLC easier than ever to use. Twoflower fixes several hundreds of bugs, in more than 7000 commits from 160 volunteers."
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RE[6]: play/pause on LMB
by phoenix on Tue 21st Feb 2012 15:32 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: play/pause on LMB"
phoenix
Member since:
2005-07-11

I call bullshit. The XBMC docs call bullshit. And the XBMC forums are full of threads that call bullshit.

If you do not have OpenGL 1.4+ support in your graphics hardware (meaning an Ati Radeon 9600 or newer or an nVidia GeForce 6000 or newer), you will not be able to run XBMC 10+. Period. Doesn't matter what CPU you have in the box, nor which OS you are running.

Maybe older versions of XBMC worked in the past. But 10 onward require working 3D acceleration. Even just for accessing the menus/GUI.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[7]: play/pause on LMB
by Laurence on Tue 21st Feb 2012 21:08 in reply to "RE[6]: play/pause on LMB"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

I call bullshit. The XBMC docs call bullshit. And the XBMC forums are full of threads that call bullshit.

If you do not have OpenGL 1.4+ support in your graphics hardware (meaning an Ati Radeon 9600 or newer or an nVidia GeForce 6000 or newer), you will not be able to run XBMC 10+. Period. Doesn't matter what CPU you have in the box, nor which OS you are running.

Maybe older versions of XBMC worked in the past. But 10 onward require working 3D acceleration. Even just for accessing the menus/GUI.


It's actually 1.3, not 1.4 and that's likely only something introduced in the last ~18/24 months. (IIRC XBMC underwent a massive overhaul recently). But that's neither here nor there as pretty much every graphics chipset of the last 10 years supports OpenGL 1.3. It's hardly a high level of entry.

Going back to my ~$20 card, maybe those Linux drivers do have some OpenGL libraries then. All I know is any 3D rendering done on that system falls back to software mode so I just assumed i couldn't do any acceleration what so ever. I guess that just goes to show how shoddy graphics drivers are on Linux yet how well XBMC is that it plays ball even when everything else fails.

All of the hardware specs were 100% accurate though - I have no reason to lie nor bullshit you (plus the proof about the ARM board is well publicised). And my point still stands about other media centres available. so even taking the OpenGL 1.3 argument into account, you're still making unbalanced comparisons about the footprint of media centres. so perhaps you should try something other than the latest XBMC-derived code before casting judgement on the entire genre. ;)

Edited 2012-02-21 21:15 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[8]: play/pause on LMB
by phoenix on Tue 21st Feb 2012 23:31 in reply to "RE[7]: play/pause on LMB"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

[q]I call bullshit. The XBMC docs call bullshit. And the XBMC forums are full of threads that call bullshit.

If you do not have OpenGL 1.4+ support in your graphics hardware (meaning an Ati Radeon 9600 or newer or an nVidia GeForce 6000 or newer), you will not be able to run XBMC 10+. Period. Doesn't matter what CPU you have in the box, nor which OS you are running.

Maybe older versions of XBMC worked in the past. But 10 onward require working 3D acceleration. Even just for accessing the menus/GUI.


It's actually 1.3, not 1.4 and that's likely only something introduced in the last ~18/24 months. (IIRC XBMC underwent a massive overhaul recently). But that's neither here nor there as pretty much every graphics chipset of the last 10 years supports OpenGL 1.3. It's hardly a high level of entry.[/quote]

Nope. You need an Ati RADEON 9600 or newer (I have a 9550, and XBMC 10+ does not run), or an nVidia GeForce 6 or newer (I have a GeForce FX 5500, and XBMC 10+ does not run). It took a long time to find an AGP card that would work in my HTPC (using old PC parts) and allow me to run XBMC 10+ (now running 11-beta3 on an Ati RADEON All-in-Wonder 9800 Pro).

All of the hardware specs were 100% accurate though


Obviously your timeline was off, though. ;) You weren't running XBMC 10+ on any of those boxes.

so even taking the OpenGL 1.3 argument into account, you're still making unbalanced comparisons about the footprint of media centres.


Nope. I can run KDE 4.6 (Kubuntu 10.10 or 11.04, don't remember which) with Dragon Player, connecting via NFS or Samba (used both) to a media server, playing XviD videos across 54 Mbps wireless on my ancient P4 Celeron system with an Ati RADEON 7000 and only 512 MB of RAM ... but I can't run XBMC 10 on that box. Nor can I run Boxee (don't remember the version, was 6 months or so ago I was doing this). And there was one other media centre app for Linux I tried, that also didn't run. The graphics stack won't support them.

And none of the Linux graphics drivers for the AiW 9800
would power the component video out.

Yet Windows XP (a more than 10 year old OS) runs XBMC 11 just fine on that hardware.

It all comes down to graphics stacks. Media centre apps need more support than just outputting video to the screen.

so perhaps you should try something other than the latest XBMC-derived code before casting judgement on the entire genre. ;)


If I can run a recent version of KDE on the hardware, but not a recent version of XBMC, Boxee, and some other one I don't recall the name of, why not disparage the genre? That's a big chunk of the genre.

Reply Parent Score: 1