Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 24th Feb 2012 21:59 UTC
Multimedia, AV An interesting anecdote at MinimalMac about television being broken. The author's young daughter, who is growing up in a Netflix/Hulu/iTunes/etc. household, was confronted with actual TV for the first time, and wonders why she can't pick what to watch, why the shows are being interrupted all the time, and so on. Clearly - TV is broken.
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DVD Quality
by lucas_maximus on Sat 25th Feb 2012 16:32 UTC
lucas_maximus
Member since:
2009-08-18

If you have a decent upscaler in your TV (like I do), you can barely see the difference between 1080 and DVD.

Predator and Apocalypse Now (the two true tests of image quality on a television, due to the Quality of filming and the sheer number of greens) both DVDs look damn brilliant on my Hannespree 32inch 1080 television.

However I will admit that this only upscales well on newer DVDs that are newer and true widescreen, I have no tried it with the Dollars Triology which is filmed in ratio which is more narrow than widescreen (I forget its name now).

Nonetheless because this is now academic, I own Predator on Blu-ray.

EDIT: I also use a PopCorn Hour A-200 Box, this has a built in Torrent Client and has pretty much every codec, and uses Samba to connect to Windows, I honestly couldn't get along with media PC ... too much work.

Edited 2012-02-25 16:40 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE: DVD Quality
by ilovebeer on Sat 25th Feb 2012 19:57 in reply to "DVD Quality"
ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

If you have a decent upscaler in your TV (like I do), you can barely see the difference between 1080 and DVD.

You should know there's a massive difference between upscaling something and comparing it against the source you upscaled from, and comparing DVD with native 1080p...

Upscaling (and for that matter, transcoding anything to higher bitrates) will _never_ improve quality. The absolute best you can hope for is the same as your source.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: DVD Quality
by galvanash on Sat 25th Feb 2012 20:34 in reply to "RE: DVD Quality"
galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

Upscaling (and for that matter, transcoding anything to higher bitrates) will _never_ improve quality. The absolute best you can hope for is the same as your source.


Sorry, but that is simply not true in all cases. Upscaling (as the OP was using the term) has nothing at all to do with bitrate or improving the quality of the source material - it is about preparing it as best as possible for the screen it will be presented on.

Most older HD TVs simply enlarge the lower resolution image of a DVD to fit the screen size by performing simple block scaling. This works but generally looks horrible, and the larger the screen the worse it looks.

TVs or DVD players that perform "upscaling" are using much more sophisticated interpolation algorithms to perform the scaling, as well as usually performing motion compensation to correct issues that arise during scene transitions, etc.

Also, if you are preparing DVD material for display on a 1080p screen, transcoding it to 1080p resolution can improve the picture quality relative to the original DVD - it depends on the TV it will be displayed on. It isn't a matter of bitrate, it is simply compensating for poor scaling circuitry in the TV. Granted, most current HDTVs have very good scaling performance - but if you have an older one the difference can be quite dramatic.

Just saying, it is not always pointless.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: DVD Quality
by lucas_maximus on Mon 27th Feb 2012 11:48 in reply to "RE: DVD Quality"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

I appreciate it doesn't improve the actual quality. However it improved the perceivable quality.

i.e. if the DVD was merely stretched to fit, it would look terrible, However the upscaler makes it look almost as good as Hi-Def. I can barely see the difference between DVD of Predator and Predator Blu-ray ... I was quite surprised.

While it isn't better quality in a mathematical sense this fact is simply academic.

My existing DVD media looks more than good enough on my Hi-Definition TV ... so I get the best of both worlds.

1) I don't have to replace my existing DVDs (since they look more than good enough).
2) I can enjoy Hi-def content.

Edited 2012-02-27 11:55 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2