Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 11th Mar 2012 22:21 UTC
Windows And thus, Microsoft bites itself in its behind with Metro. As you all surely know by now, the Metro environment in Windows 8, and its accompanying applications, need to follow a relatively strict set of rules and regulations, much like, say, applications on iOS. For one type of application, Metro has already proven to be too restrictive and limited: web browsers. Microsoft has had to define a separate application class [.docx] - aside from Metro and desktop applications - just to make third party web browsers possible for Windows 8.
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Bill Shooter of Bul
Member since:
2006-07-14

In what area are monopolies sensible?

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Comment by Drumhellar
by zima on Mon 12th Mar 2012 16:28 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Drumhellar"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

... parts of public utilities, infrastructure; where it's just natural, efficient, lowers costs; and in return for servicing virtually whole of the population, also unprofitable parts, with stable prices.
Or spectrum, in a way - otherwise it would probably end up in mafia-like web of extortions and/or who can build the more powerful transmitters (or, really, jammers - so going back to extortions). Maybe also financial exchanges.
Or in general, network effects can be and are beneficial, especially where the infrastructure involved is very costly.

Properly regulated of course - EU fines are part of the process, that's this "separate thing" that I mentioned.

(yeah, sure, I sorta can do business with another power company and such ...but, really, this is just procedural cloak, hiding the nature of the situation, as part of those regulatory activities)

Reply Parent Score: 2