Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 6th Jun 2012 23:34 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Bloomberg: "Microsoft, which has tightly controlled the number of ARM-based devices it is supporting at first to ensure quality, opted not to work with HTC after initial discussions with the company, said two people familiar with the matter. The world's largest software maker decided HTC didn't have the sales volume needed and had less tablet experience than some of the other vendors it could choose to work with for the first round of devices, the people said." HTC was the first company to build a Microsoft-powered smartphone. Now, they're not allowed to build Windows 8 tablets.
Thread beginning with comment 521130
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Where does this leave Sprint?
by Morgan on Thu 7th Jun 2012 05:26 UTC
Morgan
Member since:
2005-06-29

So, since Nokia is pretty much the only Windows Phone manufacturer left (Samsung doesn't count, their focus is on Android these days) and they will likely never release a CDMA device in the U.S., does this mean the HTC Arrive is the end of the road for us Sprint WP7 users? I've read over the past year that Nokia is testing CDMA WP7 devices in China, but as for the U.S. it's all rumors at this point.

I won't go back to Android again for a mobile phone; I tried an Android phone for a few weeks last month and was gagging by the end of the trial, despite the fact that it was supposed to be an excellent device. If I can't get a new Windows phone on Sprint, I'd rather get an iPhone than go back to Android and all of its bugs. I love it on tablets, but on phones it resoundingly stinks. I'm not going to put myself through constant reboots while talking to a customer and texts that never go through.

No OS is without its flaws, but WP7 is still my favorite mobile OS by far since Palm Garnet on a Treo. At least I can conduct business on it without constantly worrying about glitches breaking my workflow.

Reply Score: 3

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I won't go back to Android again for a mobile phone; I tried an Android phone for a few weeks last month and was gagging by the end of the trial, despite the fact that it was supposed to be an excellent device. If I can't get a new Windows phone on Sprint, I'd rather get an iPhone than go back to Android and all of its bugs. I love it on tablets, but on phones it resoundingly stinks. I'm not going to put myself through constant reboots while talking to a customer and texts that never go through.


You must be the unluckiest person on the face of the earth, then, to have Android phones behave like that only for you. Bummer.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

Well two of the three Android phones I've owned were Motorola, and those two were the worst offenders. The first was the Motorola Cliq, which happened to be Motorola's first Android device, so it somewhat gets a pass. The last phone I've tried is the Motorola Admiral, released less than a year ago and supposedly a business phone through-and-through. Yet it is also plagued with stability issues. It's possible that it's the hardware in the case of the Cliq, as I've tried a couple of CM7 builds in the past and the instability was still present. As there are no alternate ROMs available for the Admiral yet, I can't say for sure on it.

And despite your juvenile, baiting comment, you should really check out the Motorola forums for both phones. I think your eyes will be opened and you won't be so quick to judge. I'm one of a horde of dissatisfied Motorola users who have had the exact same issues with both phones. As I said before, the Cliq gets a pass mostly because it was Motorola's first foray into Android, but they've had two years and over a dozen attempts at making better Android devices; they should have gotten it right by now.

It's not just a Motorola thing either, at least for me. The second Android phone I've used is the HTC-built MyTouch 4G. While it was a better phone by far than the other two, it also had stability issues, specifically when placing a call the dialer would often crash and send me back to the home screen. I had no problems sending texts as with the other two phones, but a day didn't go by without hearing "you never answered me" from someone who had sent me a text. I would then get the texts a day or so later. I never found this particular problem in the HTC forums but the dialer crashing was a common occurrence. Even the update to 2.3 didn't fix these issues, though it did help with Bluetooth A2DP and seemed to make the launcher a bit smoother.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

One other point: I haven't used ICS on a phone yet, and since the CM team doesn't seem interested in making a ROM for the Admiral that I still own, I doubt I'll be able to try it out. My budget is limited, and when I bought the Admiral it was a toss-up between it the HTC Shift. My best friend, an Android fan through and though, suggested I should go for the HTC and not the Motorola based on his own experiences, but I decided on the latter since I liked the phone's physical layout better. I was also concerned that there would be no further development for the Shift, and I thought that with the Admiral being a new phone it would be well supported by Motorola. I was wrong about that too.

So I would say the fault is mine this time around for choosing a bad phone, but regardless I'm back on my Arrive and am at peace with my phone once again.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Fergy Member since:
2006-04-10

You must be the unluckiest person on the face of the earth, then, to have Android phones behave like that only for you. Bummer.

Android haters claim that most people don't choose an android phone. They simply choose a cheap phone and get android. Kind of like how nobody chose Nokia's but simply got them because they were the cheapest...
I have no idea how people can seriously believe that

Reply Parent Score: 5

JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

(Android) I love it on tablets, but on phones it resoundingly stinks.

Interesting. Most people would say the opposite.

But it depends on your needs. WP7 may be a good device in some cases and not so much in most other.
Win8 on tablets, though, might be a very good experience.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

I say that because on a phone, when the dialer crashes or the phone reboots during a call it's a big deal. A phone's primary function is as a communications device, and if it fails at that function it may as well be a brick as far as I'm concerned.

On the other hand, a tablet is a media consumption device. A reboot while watching a TV episode or reading a book is an annoyance, but it's not going to cause you to lose a client due to having to call them back constantly when your phone won't play ball. I loved CM7 on my Nook (gifted to my sister recently), and I've played with several other Android tablets that I really enjoyed too.

The only issue I've had thus far with WP7 is that, on Sprint, it won't automatically split long texts at the 160 character mark. This is a known issue and Sprint and Microsoft are each blaming the other instead of working together to fix it. I suspect the source of the problem is the way CDMA phones handle SMS messages, but to my knowledge WP7 is the only phone OS that Sprint has this specific issue with.

I haven't had a chance to use a Win8 tablet yet, but I have a feeling it might very well be a great experience. I know that I detest Windows 8 on desktops though; if Windows 7 wasn't an option I wouldn't run Windows at all on my home computer.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Flatland_Spider Member since:
2006-09-01

My wife has the same amazing ability to kill Android phones, which is unfortunate since she relies heavily on her phone to do her job.

We both had Samsung Captivates with the stock ROM, and after a couple months stuff started crashing. I switch us to the Miui.us ROM, and after a couple of months the force closes started again. We switch phones, and same results. Although the last time was because of the Spotify app.

After the last episode, I bought her a Galaxy Nexus hoping it's a software problem caused by Samsung. The next step for her is an iPhone 5, whenever that is released, if the Nexus starts crashing.

The most aggravating thing is how hard Android phones are to fix. My wife had problems with her Blackberries, but they were at least easy to backup and reinstall.

Reply Parent Score: 2

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

Look into Wug's Root Toolkit.

http://www.galaxynexusforum.com/forum/galaxy-nexus-hacking-mods-lte...

You may not want to unlock/root the device for your wife but look at the backup function. It will backup apps *and* app data. Backups can be taken even from an encrypted device. Backup files will be encrypted. Restoring the backup to the device after a reset or firmware update is painless.

(ha.. nice.. v1.4 is out.. gotta got update my own install)

I've found the built-in Android backup function handy. It covers OS settings, Google apps and related data. I've found it covers most third party apps but I've had a few restored naked leaving me to repopulate them.

I've also tried the various backup apps (all want to backup to an SD which is no good with the Nexus lacking a removable SD slot). They also tend to only backup the apps not the app data so they rank somewhere around useless for me.

Wug's does it right though. Apps and app data from encrypted or unencrypted device with backup file encrypted and stored on your computer not the Android devices own storage.

If your wife experiences software issues fixed in a later version of Android, you can also upgrade the device from Google's official firmware rather than waiting for your carrier to maybe eventually push ICS 4.0.4 or whatever is current by then. (A big fat WTF to my carrier for still not having pushed the 4.0.4 out for stock devices.. what the hell Rogers?)

Reply Parent Score: 3

Bounty Member since:
2006-09-18

I've never had a crash on my HTC Incredible. If I had to guess some of you are "power users" installing a bunch of (interesting) apps that tend to mess with your phone environment.

You may have less crashes in more tightly controlled environments (iPhone) or envirnments with less (interesting) apps (Windows mobile).

I'm not saying this is certainly the case, but it's a guess as to why Android has been less than stable for some.

Reply Parent Score: 2

jnemesh Member since:
2008-04-08

Androids are easy to fix, ESPECIALLY the Nexus models! You really can't blame anyone for the crashes when you were running MIUI...custom ROMs are prone to crashing...if you want stability, use a stock ROM!

Avoid "free" apps as well. Even the good ones drain battery life to feed you ads to "pay" for the app! Spend the $2-$5 for the app...it's not going to kill your wallet and your phone will thank you! Also, "free" apps are the major source of malware. ONLY buy from trusted developers and PAY ATTENTION to the permissions you grant your apps!

If you keep your phone free of "crapps", you shouldn't have any problems with your wife's Nexus.

Reply Parent Score: 1

jnemesh Member since:
2008-04-08

Windows Phone is a end regardless of what handset you own or what carrier you are on, and decisions like this...locking out one of only a HANDFUL of companies that supported you when you were struggling, is NOT the way to build hype ahead of a major launch. There are plenty of Titan and Titan II customers who will probably leave the platform when they see this news and realize they can't ever have a tablet to match their phones.

Additionally, there will be plenty of others who are not directly affected who will be turned off by Microsoft's blatant favoritism towards some companies and at the same time snubbing others. It just leaves a bad taste in your mouth supporting a company like this.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

It just leaves a bad taste in your mouth supporting a company like this.


Indeed it does, but unfortunately just as with Windows on the desktop, I have to use the tool that works best for me when it comes to putting food on the table. If I didn't use my phone so much for consulting jobs, I'd settle for the most stable Android device I could find since that OS at least will continue being actively supported.

Maybe I should do like the sheriff's office I work full time for did recently: They had so many issues after moving the deputies and detectives to Android phones they scrapped them and went back to ruggedized dumbphones. Now that all the patrol vehicles have MDTs (mobile data terminals) they don't really need smartphones anyway. Once I've worn out this WP7 device maybe I'll go back to using a phone as just a phone and carry a MID for mobile computing.

That is, of course, if there is such a thing as a decent dumbphone left when that time comes.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Windows Phone is a end regardless of what handset you own or what carrier you are on, and decisions like this...locking out one of only a HANDFUL of companies that supported you when you were struggling


It's likely nothing personal. Chip SoC makers (Qualcomm , Texas Instruments, nVidea) likely have limited resources to provide support for developing Windows RT tablets.

Its only the logical choice to chose OEMs who have proven track records of moving volume (ASUS, Samsung, etc.) over a relatively untested HTC.

HTC is however free to build a Windows 8 x86 tablet because that is a more established platform, and there is likely less R&D overhead in bringing one to market.

Reply Parent Score: 2

tanzam75 Member since:
2011-05-19

I don't know if Nokia will release a CDMA Windows phone in the US. But do note that Verizon has already said some positive things about Windows Phone 8.

(Sprint, I don't think so. Sprint has put itself in a position in which they will go bankrupt unless they can make the iPhone deal work out.)

Reply Parent Score: 1

Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

I don't know if Nokia will release a CDMA Windows phone in the US. But do note that Verizon has already said some positive things about Windows Phone 8.


I detest the way Verizon treats their customers so I likely won't go there. I'd sooner go back to T-Mobile or even AT&T.

Sprint, I don't think so. Sprint has put itself in a position in which they will go bankrupt unless they can make the iPhone deal work out.


I doubt that will happen. At worst, Verizon will buy them out and I'll be able to break out of my contract and move on.

Reply Parent Score: 2