Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 6th Jul 2012 22:42 UTC
Mozilla & Gecko clones Mozilla has announced it's ceasing development on Thunderbird; one more version will be released, and it'll be security updates from then on. "Most Thunderbird users seem happy with the basic email feature set. In parallel, we have seen the rising popularity of Web-based forms of communications representing email alternatives to a desktop solution. Given this, focusing on stability for Thunderbird and driving innovation through other offerings seems a natural choice." Makes sense - I mean, there's only so much you can do with something that needs to send and receive mail, and I can't imagine Thunderbird having a lot of users. Strange, almost Microsoftian obtuse announcement, by the way.
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I don't like this trend
by winter skies on Fri 6th Jul 2012 23:16 UTC
winter skies
Member since:
2009-08-21

So it seems who commented before me is implying that being able to read your email and/or view your attachments when offline is of no interest to anyone.
I disagree.
I like having all my mail in one, easily accessible "place" that is not dependent on the availability of my Internet connection, thanks. It seems crazy to me to be forced to use ugly web interfaces to manage my messages. Moreover, I like to keep my accounts separate - ie no redirection to my main gmail address, please.
Am I the only one?

Reply Score: 20

RE: I don't like this trend
by smashIt on Fri 6th Jul 2012 23:34 in reply to "I don't like this trend"
smashIt Member since:
2005-07-06

Am I the only one?


nope
i us thunderbird since ~3 years and don't plan to switch to some stupid webmail-crap

sorry, but with 4 mail-accounts and over 50 aliases thats no option for me

and don't get me started on privacy-issues

Edited 2012-07-06 23:35 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 22

BeamishBoy Member since:
2010-10-27

and don't get me started on privacy-issues


Unless every email you send and receive is encrypted, the privacy of your email is a moot point.

Edited 2012-07-07 02:07 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE: I don't like this trend
by zima on Sat 7th Jul 2012 00:26 in reply to "I don't like this trend"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

So it seems who commented before me is implying that being able to read your email and/or view your attachments when offline is of no interest to anyone.
I disagree.
I like having all my mail in one, easily accessible "place" that is not dependent on the availability of my Internet connection, thanks. It seems crazy to me to be forced to use ugly web interfaces to manage my messages[...]
Am I the only one?

You're almost certainly not the only one, but you're also most likely in the minority WRT to email priorities...

It seems you in turn are implying that being able to read/search your inbox and/or view your attachments when outside is of no interest to anyone.
Meanwhile, people do like that option, access on any computer (whether or not that's always wise is another issue; but they do like it), and/or on more than one of their personal devices.

They like having all their mail in one, easily accessible "place" that is not dependent on them constantly carrying their laptop around. It probably seemed crazy to them to be forced to use ugly local clients to manage their messages... (judging from how email usage apparently exploded with availability of decent webmails, how that's the mode of choice for most users)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: I don't like this trend
by maccouch on Sat 7th Jul 2012 00:52 in reply to "RE: I don't like this trend"
maccouch Member since:
2012-03-14


It seems you in turn are implying that being able to read/search your inbox and/or view your attachments when outside is of no interest to anyone.
Meanwhile, people do like that option, access on any computer (whether or not that's always wise is another issue; but they do like it), and/or on more than one of their personal devices.


You seem to have the impression that using a desktop client somehow forbids having the email on your webserver and easy accessible trhough other computers. It doesn't. if you use IMAP, the desktop client and server just behave like a mirror of each other. I have most of my email on my webserver, sent email, trash, INbox, other sub folders. And have exactly the same folders with the same email on my destkop client... (a lot of selected email i store at my mac only, for safety. But until i use my laptop to check it, then it's still there on the web )

I just prefer to use the client because i can do more, get easy warning of new email, offline acces and other accounts which i can't or i'm not supposed to forward or store on other server/company.



They like having all their mail in one, easily accessible "place" that is not dependent on them constantly carrying their laptop around. It probably seemed crazy to them to be forced to use ugly local clients to manage their messages... (judging from how email usage apparently exploded with availability of decent webmails, how that's the mode of choice for most users)


i agree with you but most people are morons... (sorry to say that). Webmail is good if you use it for facebook and cat pics sends. If you use it for any resemblance of a profession, webmail is definitely not the way to go. Not that it can't be done, just that it shouldn't.

Consulting your email on random computers is a security risk waiting to happen. If some one gets to your cat pics , no problem. If they get to your bank reset password email or other financial security info, then big problem. But as you said, the wisdom of such option is not relevant to this discussion. (it should, but then we would be back at "most people are morons..)

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE: I don't like this trend
by Morgan on Sat 7th Jul 2012 01:30 in reply to "I don't like this trend"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

Definitely not the only one, though I'm actually partial to Claws-mail on *nix boxen.

I set up two of our workstations at the part time job with Thunderbird so we can get around Google's annoying limitations regarding mailing lists. We have a ton of customers signed up to receive weekly specials, and Thunderbird makes it easy to send out mass mailings with embedded HTML. With the Gmail web interface the HTML is stripped out and the account is suspended if you send more than a few BCCs at once.

Reply Parent Score: 6

marcus0263 Member since:
2007-06-02

Another one here, I can't stand web browser email interfaces. Love the power and flexability of a real email client.

Haven't used Thunderbird for a few years, I use Claws Mail but most of the members of my family use T-Bird. Shame to see it go not to mention a mistake IMO.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE: I don't like this trend
by twitterfire on Sun 8th Jul 2012 17:49 in reply to "I don't like this trend"
twitterfire Member since:
2008-09-11

So it seems who commented before me is implying that being able to read your email and/or view your attachments when offline is of no interest to anyone.
I disagree.

It depends on your personal situation. For some profession, business, hobby or occupation having the ability to read offline e-mail might be of importance. However I am many hrs / day online.

Even if I'm not I can get online very fast (mobile phone, laptop, 3G data, etc) and if I go visit some remote place like Kalahari Desert or countryside India or China or Jordan or Peru or Brazilian Rainforrest I am during my vacation and I couldn't care less about such things as e-mails. (in fact I have different 'work' or 'business' and 'personal' mobile numbers and during my vacation my 'work' phone is shut down ;) :D:D)

Even if I were visiting the Brazilian Rainforrest and I were in a big need to read my e-mails, I would probably use a satellite connection. (satellite connections suck and are expensive but for emails are ok and if I were in a big need of reading/sending e-mails anywhere the cost might not be such a big issue)

So having offline e-mails might be a must for some people but I guess this is a rare case.

And nobody is killing offline e-mails, Mozilla is just saying that they don't want to use too many resources for a client just a few people use. There are many e-mail solutions beside Thunderbird and people who need can use those.

Reply Parent Score: 2