Linked by paolone on Fri 20th Jul 2012 19:21 UTC
Amiga & AROS The AROS distribution Icaros Desktop has made its next step towards compatibility with legacy Amiga workbench applications, including an entire AROS enviroment compiled for the classic Amiga platform, which is almost binary compatible with the original Amiga OS 3.1 (and its extensions). When the user needs an old program, he or she only has to fire up the AROS M68K environment and run the application. The Amiga virtual machine can optionally be set to run at startup like a system service.
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AMOS Pro is included?
by iMissBeOS on Fri 20th Jul 2012 19:51 UTC
iMissBeOS
Member since:
2012-05-24

That's AWESOME! I loved working with AMOS back in the early-to-mid 90's. Francoise Lionet was/is a genius - he and his crew made a wonderfully accessible and powerful programming language for the Amiga. I spent many, many, many hours designing games in AMOS. Fun stuff!

Reply Score: 3

RE: AMOS Pro is included?
by bassbeast on Sun 22nd Jul 2012 07:16 in reply to "AMOS Pro is included?"
bassbeast Member since:
2007-11-11

That's nice but I have a question: Other than nostalgia what is the point?

I mean I can understand why you'd want Amiga back in the day, with its specialized chips it was a multimedia monster in an age where a 30 FPS 320x240 video on anybody else was frankly impossible.

But why now? what does Amiga offer that the others don't? You don't have the killer specialized hardware anymore since everyone uses the same bog standard stuff, it frankly can't hold a candle to a modern Windows, OSX, or Linux when it comes to multitasking, so other than nostalgia what is the appeal?

Not trying to troll, and if anybody was waiting for this please do enjoy it, i'm just trying to understand what the appeal is here. I mean I get maybe firing up a VM once in a while just to relive memories, but what is the point of completely rebuilding a long dead OS like this?

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: AMOS Pro is included?
by Zobeid on Sun 22nd Jul 2012 13:35 in reply to "RE: AMOS Pro is included?"
Zobeid Member since:
2012-04-28

Of course nostalgia is part of it... The Amiga was probably the most widespread and popular computing platform to ever suffer total commercial failure (thanks to Commodore's mismanagement), so obviously there are a lot of people who don't want to let it go. (The inclusion of software like AMOS Pro and Hurrican says something about this too.)

But, more than that... It's an alternative. Rational or not, some of us are attracted to the different, the offbeat. We don't think it should be the destiny of every OS to someday grow up and become a Unix or Linux spinoff. That applies not only to AROS and Icaros Desktop, but also Haiku, Syllable, etc.

Also, it's small. Linux (at least in the mainstream distros) has followed the path of Windows and Mac OS X, and bloated out into a multi-gigabyte monster. It's really too much of a good thing. I feel like if an OS can't fit on a CD-R, it tells me something has gone way, way off track.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: AMOS Pro is included?
by ferrels on Mon 23rd Jul 2012 02:44 in reply to "RE: AMOS Pro is included?"
ferrels Member since:
2006-08-15

Just like MorphOS, the point is that you can have an Amiga-like system on modern hardware. AROS includes 3D hardware acceleration via GAllium 3D with all the eye-candy we've come to expect from late generation nVidia hardware as well as all the other niceties that we've come to enjoy from low-cost, modern hardware. As I said in an earlier post, that's the whole point of AROS. AROS wasn't designed to re-live the glory days of 68K Amigas. If you want to do that, go and buy a classic 68K Amiga system or use one of the UAE variants under Windows or Linux. But until AROS gets broader software support, especially office apps, then 68K emulation will just have to be a stop-gap until that support improves. We need native x86 AROS native versions of Ignition (spreadsheet), and a few other tools before AROS is ready for everyday use.

Edited 2012-07-23 02:45 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: AMOS Pro is included?
by paolone on Mon 23rd Jul 2012 08:08 in reply to "RE: AMOS Pro is included?"
paolone Member since:
2007-09-24

i'm just trying to understand what the appeal is here. I mean I get maybe firing up a VM once in a while just to relive memories, but what is the point of completely rebuilding a long dead OS like this?


AmigaOS made some real magic when hardware resources were scarce. At the times of first Pentium and Athlon processors I often asked myself how a low-footprint OS like AmigaOS would have performed on such CPUs, since it performed so well on a <10 MHz processor. I embraced the AROS project short after its birth because I felt it could give me an answer. And that's my motivation.

I perfectly know the world has changed so much in the meanwhile. We've now multi core processors, multi CPU motherboards, hybrid architectures like APUs and all the power a GPU can give, not only with graphics. So now my new curiosity is about how Amiga can deal with all this, and once again AROS can give me the answers (although current stable branch supports just 1 CPU and has no OpenCL support yet, multicore stuff is in the works).

Moreover, I grew up with the Amiga in the first 90s and loved its OS: there are many little habits I couldn't simply find in "mainstream OSes", so if I can have a way to continue with them, performing about the same tasks I can do with other alternatives, why shouldn't I?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: AMOS Pro is included?
by zima on Wed 25th Jul 2012 03:38 in reply to "RE: AMOS Pro is included?"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Other than nostalgia what is the point?
I mean I can understand why you'd want Amiga back in the day, with its specialized chips it was a multimedia monster in an age where a 30 FPS 320x240 video on anybody else was frankly impossible.
But why now? what does Amiga offer that the others don't? [...] other than nostalgia what is the appeal?
[...] what is the point of completely rebuilding a long dead OS like this?

Remember, AROS started in what was basically still mid-90s, when the memory was fresh. And then they managed to keep tinkering with it - good for them, I'd say (considering how many ~hobby OS died along the way).
But at least AROS seems the least crazy out of all ~Amiga projects, it mostly realizes its place - while some other camps sometimes seemed to behave and express like they're just those few steps away from taking back the world.

And 30 FPS 320x240 video? I don't think that was possible on pretty much anything-consumer (and was brought largely by PCs, later) - CDXL had considerably lower resolution and framerate, plus very limited colour palette.
unless you meant animation, but that's a bit distinct (and, within different gfx styles, some other machines could do it too)

Reply Parent Score: 2