Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 14th Aug 2012 22:17 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless You wouldn't believe it, but something actually, truly interesting came out of the Apple vs. Samsung lawsuit yesterday. Apple had conducted a survey to find out why, exactly, consumers opted to go with Android instead of the iPhone. The results are fascinating - not only do they seem to invalidate Apple's claims, they provide an unusual insight into consumer behaviour. The gist? People choose Android not because it's an iPhone copy - they choose it because of Android's unique characteristics.
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RE: Comment by ilovebeer
by l3v1 on Wed 15th Aug 2012 06:17 UTC in reply to "Comment by ilovebeer"
l3v1
Member since:
2005-07-06

Were people who bought iPhone's surveyed the exact opposite of what you're trying to say would be the case.


Uhmm, I wouldn't just suppose so. If you ask an iPhone buyer why (s)he bought the iPhone probably the most frequent answer would be that because they wanted an iPhone. I mean not because of x, y, z feature (well, maybe the looks would count, of course, we're talking Apple here) or because of the carrier's this and that. That's not necessarily a bad thing, it just would prove that Apple has a great fashion factor and still has some coolness factor (a diminishing one, but still) at least at some locations on the planet. But I highly doubt they would or could list a number of points similar to the one in the article.

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[2]: Comment by ilovebeer
by clasqm on Wed 15th Aug 2012 08:07 in reply to "RE: Comment by ilovebeer"
clasqm Member since:
2010-09-23

They didn't list them. They were presented with a prefabricated list of choices and told to tick all that apply. As I've said elsewhere, the options that were NOT supplied might be as interesting as the ones that were. And people ticking off items on a list does not imply that they've given it a lot of thought. There's the "hadn't occurred to me, but I guess so" factor.

Reply Parent Score: 2