Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 20th Aug 2012 21:04 UTC, submitted by suka
Gnome In a recent interview with the Austrian newssite derStandard.at, GNOME designer Jon McCann talks about GNOME OS, the consequences of Canonical leaving GNOME behind, the purported removal of features and the future role of Linux distributions. "I think there was a time when GNOME had kind of a crisis, we didn't know where we wanted to go, we were lacking goals and vision - that was the end of the GNOME2 cycle. So we pulled together and formed a vision where we want to go - and actually did something about it. And now we have been marching on that plan for quite some time."
Thread beginning with comment 531678
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[5]: Plan?
by Hiev on Tue 21st Aug 2012 18:32 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Plan?"
Hiev
Member since:
2005-09-27

No, the excuse is that they like to keep the applications simple, an extra pane with tabs is not simple, the task can be acomplished with two instances side by side, some people may not understand the change like you and is ok, but is not the end of the world eather, some people just like to extrapolate their own issues.

Edited 2012-08-21 18:33 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: Plan?
by linux-lover on Tue 21st Aug 2012 20:56 in reply to "RE[5]: Plan?"
linux-lover Member since:
2011-04-25

No, the excuse is that they like to keep the applications simple, an extra pane with tabs is not simple, the task can be acomplished with two instances side by side, some people may not understand the change like you and is ok, but is not the end of the world eather, some people just like to extrapolate their own issues.

First, not on by defualt. You had to ask the application to show panes or tabs. There isn't even a new tab button.

Yes you can view 2 directroies by having 2 windows, but that is inefficent compared to panes.

The point is, according to the git commit was it does not work well on touch. I really don't care about the pane feature. I am just citing this a evidence that gnome cares more about touch then traditional input methods.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[7]: Plan?
by Hiev on Tue 21st Aug 2012 21:09 in reply to "RE[6]: Plan?"
Hiev Member since:
2005-09-27

No, you fail to put your self in the developers shoes, their philosophy is to keep the application simple, not only the UI, but also the code, a side pane is just good to move/copy files by dragging them, it may looks easy, but for a developer it means to write more code and mantain that code just for a task that can be already be reashed with another simple medium, in this case to instances of the application side by side, if you put in the balance the number of user that use an extra pane with the code that needs to be changed and mantainined just to reach goal that is already acomplished with the minimun effort then you will undertand the essense of that desition.

Now, for the touch friendly part, of course, if it is part of their goal to make it touch friendly and that means get rid of some other no so touch friendly options is ok as long there is still a way to do the task, and btw, GNOME Shell is not only touch friendly, it is also keyboard friendly so you can use your keyboard in the case you are in a desktop computer or a laptop, I use it daily and I use the kb a lot, specially the win key.

Edited 2012-08-21 21:27 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2