Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 3rd Oct 2012 22:21 UTC
Windows Paul Allen, one of Microsoft's co-founders who left the company long ago, has posted on his blog about his experiences with Windows 8. He (surprise) likes it, but he does note a number of shortcomings and oddities - all of which are spot-on. However, he fails to address the core issue with Windows 8: it's forcing users to drill a small hole in the wall with a belt sander.
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RE[3]: Musings about Metro
by Alfman on Thu 4th Oct 2012 19:49 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Musings about Metro"
Alfman
Member since:
2011-01-28

WorknMan,

"I think MS could've made everybody happy by giving people the ability to disable Metro completely in Windows 8 and bring the Start menu back. That way, people who like Metro can have it, and people (like me) who don't can get rid of it."

Exactly what I wanted to say. I can respect the opinion of those who like metro, as long as they can respect my opinion that I don't like it for what I do. I don't want to be dependent upon it to launch my applications.

As I mentioned in another post, the previews DID permit the restoration of the start menu through a registry hack, but microsoft is so adamant that we don't have this choice in win8 that they removed the code entirely.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Musings about Metro
by ze_jerkface on Thu 4th Oct 2012 21:03 in reply to "RE[3]: Musings about Metro"
ze_jerkface Member since:
2012-06-22


As I mentioned in another post, the previews DID permit the restoration of the start menu through a registry hack, but microsoft is so adamant that we don't have this choice in win8 that they removed the code entirely.


Oh it's worse than that, Sinfosky lied and said that enterprise and business versions of Windows would have Metro off by default. Now it's on fucking WINDOWS SERVER. What a glowing endorsement, forcing that crappy interface on their server OS.

Sinofsky probably realized that pirates would go after enterprise and server if it didn't have Metro. LOCK EM IN DERP DERP.

Oh well at least this idiotic plan will soon meet with reality and then shareholders will want Ballmer's head on a platter. Goodbye bozo.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Musings about Metro
by jeffb on Sat 6th Oct 2012 03:32 in reply to "RE[3]: Musings about Metro"
jeffb Member since:
2005-07-19

Exactly what I wanted to say. I can respect the opinion of those who like metro, as long as they can respect my opinion that I don't like it for what I do. I don't want to be dependent upon it to launch my applications.

As I mentioned in another post, the previews DID permit the restoration of the start menu through a registry hack, but microsoft is so adamant that we don't have this choice in win8 that they removed the code entirely.


Microsoft sells a product that does what you want, Windows 7. Windows 8 treats Win32 as a legacy system, the same way that when Apple migrated to OSX it was never their goal to allow you to maintain a "classic" (OS9) desktop / applications experience.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Musings about Metro
by Alfman on Sat 6th Oct 2012 05:09 in reply to "RE[4]: Musings about Metro"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

jeffb,

"Microsoft sells a product that does what you want, Windows 7."

Windows 7 won't last forever. And even if it did, it'd be rather silly to pretend that users who want a start menu don't want any of the other technical improvements that come with windows 8. If microsoft doesn't want to commit suicide with enterprise/pro users, they're not going to completely drop the desktop in the foreseeable future. It just sucks that we'll no longer be able to configure it as we want to.

"Windows 8 treats Win32 as a legacy system, the same way that when Apple migrated to OSX it was never their goal to allow you to maintain a 'classic' (OS9) desktop / applications experience."

The scale of irreplaceable business applications for OS9 was undeniably microscopic compared to those for windows. Also OSX could support thousands of unix apps out of the box. Microsoft's metro situation is hardly the same. Unless MS botches it up, the win32s are still a huge competitive advantage owing to the millions of man hours that have been invested in win32 business applications - including those written by me.


Edit: To clarify my stance, it's about having a choice. Whether one likes metro or not, it's unfortunate that MS is trying to promote metro by deliberately restricting users ability to configure the os not to use it.

Edited 2012-10-06 05:19 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2