Linked by Howard Fosdick on Thu 8th Nov 2012 20:12 UTC
Editorial In the United States, state and local authorities are in charge of voting and the country uses more than a half dozen different voting technologies. As a result, the country can't guarantee that it accurately counts national votes in a timely fashion. This article discusses the problem and potential solutions to the U.S. voting dilemma.
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DHofmann
Member since:
2005-08-19

Switching to a direct popular vote is a terrible idea. Not only does it not solve the problem that a candidate can be elected with less than 50% of the votes, but it also weakens the power of the states and makes the federal government stronger in comparison.

Reply Score: 0

modmans2ndcoming Member since:
2005-11-09

How does it weaken the states?

Reply Parent Score: 2

DHofmann Member since:
2005-08-19

The electoral college guarantees that each state gets both an equal vote and a vote proportional to its population. A national popular vote cannot guarantee either, without compelling all citizens to vote.

Edit: added "without compelling all citizens to vote".

Edited 2012-11-09 16:20 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Not only does it not solve the problem that a candidate can be elected with less than 50% of the votes

You simply make a second round one week later, just between the top two candidates, if during the first one nobody got 50+%...

Reply Parent Score: 2