Linked by Howard Fosdick on Sat 24th Nov 2012 17:52 UTC
Editorial Do you depend on your computer for your living? If so, I'm sure you've thought long and hard about which hardware and software to use. I'd like to explain why I use generic "white boxes" running open source software. These give me a platform I rely on for 100% availability. They also provide a low-cost solution with excellent security and privacy.
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lucas_maximus
Member since:
2009-08-18

Sure, but the implication is that linux lacks the tools to debug itself as well, which is untrue. If that's not what you meant to imply, then please clarify


When did I say that, I simply said that with Windows that problems can be solved using those tools ... and things can be solved without a reinstall with a little understanding of the underlying system.

"Windows isn't a magic box that happens to work until it stops working."

Neither is linux, for that matter. Either platform can run reliably for ages.


True.

My comment is more about the fact that people tend not to look for the root cause of the solution.

A lot of Linux users "distro hop" because they can't solve their problems using <distro X> and try using <distro Y> in hope it will solve their problems.

When in fact there is an underlying issue that needs to be addressed.

Either way reinstalling or installing another operating system is not the way to solve problems. It is better to scrutinize the root cause of the problem.

In short it is better to understand why you are having problem first before deciding a strategy to deal with it.

Edited 2012-11-27 20:17 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

lucas_maximus,

"When did I say that, I simply said that with Windows that problems can be solved using those tools. Nothing more."

Fair enough, I was just reading your statement in context of the previous windows/linux generalisation.

Another tool everyone on windows should have is the sysinternals process explorer. Shows processes, resources, open files, etc. It allows you to forcefully kill hidden processes that are otherwise difficult to kill and responsible for locking files.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896653


Edit:
" ... and things can be solved without a reinstall with a little understanding of the underlying system."

This is assuming you can track down the problem of course. I've had many people come to me for help in fixing something or other on windows. Usually it's something pretty trivial, but other times I have to recommend restoring or reinstalling because it's less work than trying to find out what's wrong. Sometimes just re-creating a user account is enough.

Mind you, linux can be the same way, but it's usually easier to diff the files and/or look at timestamps there. In windows you've got the whole registery to deal with.

Edited 2012-11-27 20:38 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Another tool everyone on windows should have is the sysinternals process explorer. Shows processes, resources, open files, etc. It allows you to forcefully kill hidden processes that are otherwise difficult to kill and responsible for locking files.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896653

For that specific usage, Unlocker is IMHO much more handy: http://www.emptyloop.com/unlocker/ - nicely integrates into right click menu; and can itself perform actions on the file, which avoids locking the file again by explorer.

Reply Parent Score: 2

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

PS. Hm, and apparently it has become prominent enough to have its own http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unlocker page.

Edited 2012-11-29 07:40 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2