Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 13th Jan 2013 14:48 UTC
Windows Tom Warren: "While Intel is trying to keep the Windows tree healthy, Microsoft is hoping that the leaves don't start to drop off before its own family of Surface devices are fully ready. Redmond isn't 'priming the pump' here, it's planting seeds for the future. If Microsoft is successful then it could be the world's biggest Windows OEM in just a few years. The future is Surface." You just have to look at the difference in build quality and supplied software between OEM devices and Surface even though Surface is cheaper to realise that the age of Windows OEMs is coming to an end. The writing's on the wall, and the OEMs know it: there's no future for them in Windows.
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RE: Amusing, but naive
by Kivada on Sun 13th Jan 2013 20:57 UTC in reply to "Amusing, but naive"
Kivada
Member since:
2010-07-07

You say that like it's a bad thing... Microsoft's failure would be the world's gain.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Amusing, but naive
by orestes on Mon 14th Jan 2013 01:47 in reply to "RE: Amusing, but naive"
orestes Member since:
2005-07-06

Eventually perhaps. In the short term though anyone who thinks MS going poof and leaving a vacuum is a *good* thing needs to work on their idea of what the consequences would be.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Amusing, but naive
by cdude on Mon 14th Jan 2013 05:40 in reply to "RE[2]: Amusing, but naive"
cdude Member since:
2008-09-21

What are the consequences? Competition and choice?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Amusing, but naive
by r_a_trip on Mon 14th Jan 2013 09:36 in reply to "RE[2]: Amusing, but naive"
r_a_trip Member since:
2005-07-06

There wouldn't be much in the way of consequences. MS going out of business right now, would mean it's assets would be bought by another player and Windows/Office would continue to be made.

Maybe the sudden shock of seeing a computing behemoth falter and wither away would motivate the market to diversify and make software multiplatform and less susceptible to the cycles of whatever third party.

The doomsday scenario of MS going down and all MS software magically becoming non-executable simply won't happen.

Reply Parent Score: 4