Linked by Perry Helion on Fri 15th Mar 2013 18:20 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu Ubuntu has come under a decent amount of flack over the past few months, particularly over their decision to use the 'Dash Search' to return results from Amazon by default in their most recent release.
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That's life
by stanbr on Fri 15th Mar 2013 21:20 UTC
stanbr
Member since:
2009-05-22

I think its really funny when open source guys say fragmentation is bad. That's the freaking nature of open source. If you are against it, do not publish your code under GPL/BSD/Apache/whatever.
In fact, I like OSX exactly cuz it takes the best of both worlds. I have all the open source softwares I want, on a stable and solid OS (no OS/APIs fragmentation).

Reply Score: 2

RE: That's life
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Fri 15th Mar 2013 21:57 in reply to "That's life"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Well, choosing osx severely limits your hardware options.

Its a pain in the but to get the open source software I want on it ( current versions of pyton, java, php, apache, X11, gcc). Darwin ports and fink tend to fail me pretty often.

Not to mention the difficulty of getting KDE and its associated applications on it these days.

Not to mention the continuing ios-ification.

Don't get me wrong it looked really cool years ago when none of the above (except the hardware) was true, but I've grown jaded against it over the years.

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[2]: That's life
by moondevil on Fri 15th Mar 2013 22:11 in reply to "RE: That's life"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

I think Mac OS X being UNIX based is just a matter of luck.

They needed Steve back on board and NeXT being a UNIX helped to save Mac OS, while bringing more developers on board.

If Apple had gone BeOS there wouldn't be a UNIX base to talk about.

Now that they have lots of people on their systems, there is no need to captivate the UNIX crowd for software.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: That's life
by stanbr on Sat 16th Mar 2013 18:16 in reply to "RE: That's life"
stanbr Member since:
2009-05-22

The hardware part is very true. But I really like the apple hardware (specially the notebooks). Even when I used Ubuntu, it was on a macbook. So that's not really an issue (for *me*).

And I don't even have X11 installed, so no x11/kde (and I don't miss it a bit). What softwares written for this architectures do you miss so much?

As a Java and Ruby developer, the 1.6.0_43 java version is ok for me right no, and the RVM gives me any ruby version I want. BTW, at work I was trying to run a new version of Ruby and some gems on a Debian stable and after many many hours I just gave up (on Ubuntu it was fine). And dealing with Java versions on Ubuntu was always a pain in the arse (I use it at work, unfortunately). One time, Chrome was using one version, ff another and console was using the right one. No freaking idea why. And not installing the Sun java by default is not very pragmatic at all.

Anyway, if Linux suites you best, I'm happy for you ;) I wish I could say the same.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: That's life
by NuxRo on Fri 15th Mar 2013 22:08 in reply to "That's life"
NuxRo Member since:
2010-09-25

I'm going to nuke from orbit the next person who's going to say OSX is "the best of both worlds".

Reply Parent Score: 10

RE[2]: That's life
by Hiev on Fri 15th Mar 2013 22:55 in reply to "RE: That's life"
Hiev Member since:
2005-09-27

I'm going to nuke from orbit the next person who's going to say OSX is "the best of both worlds".

Why?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: That's life
by shotsman on Sun 17th Mar 2013 03:17 in reply to "RE: That's life"
shotsman Member since:
2005-07-22

What a load of Baloney

I use Linux (I'm a RHCT/RHCE) professionally and I also use OSX. As other replies have said, as a desktop, it works with the added bonus of a Unix system underneath the GUI.

I have not been brainwashed by the Cult of St Jobs. I have been around IT and Software for more than 40 years and can make up my own mind about what works for me. I am also open to the suggestion that what works for me may not work for you but to make the suggestion your did is simplistic beyond belief.

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE: That's life
by hhas on Fri 15th Mar 2013 22:51 in reply to "That's life"
hhas Member since:
2006-11-28

I think its really funny when open source guys say fragmentation is bad.


I think what the Linux peanut gallery really mean is "any fragmentation that doesn't fit with my own personal ideology is bad". (Whereas Kosher fragmentation is perfectly hunky-dory as it provides ever more bragging rights: "Now available in two billionty flavors!") But they're probably not the ones doing all the work, and even if they are it does not matter what they think. As long as it's FOSS-compliant, that's what freedom is.

Now, there is a genuine problem with fragmentation in Linux land, but it's not in the fragmentation itself: it's in the inability to reintegrate the fragments at regular intervals. Which again I think has far more to do with personal egos and ideological differences than any technical cost. For instance, the Linux desktop would be vastly improved if 90% of desktop environments fell on their swords tomorrow, leaving the remaining 10% to focus all 100% of resources on providing the best possible experience to each distinct Linux market ("ordinary joe user", "cutting-edge leet", "crusty conservatives", "lower-power boxes"). But good luck trying to get any Linux desktop project to volunteer themselves as first for the chopping block. And so it goes.

(As for OS X, that's every bit as much of a double-edged sword - it just slices a different angle is all. Better GUI shell and better apps, but little user control over direction, and can crap on OSS work just as soon as embrace it. You pays your money...)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: That's life
by zcal on Sat 16th Mar 2013 21:51 in reply to "RE: That's life"
zcal Member since:
2012-07-27

For instance, the Linux desktop would be vastly improved if 90% of desktop environments fell on their swords tomorrow, leaving the remaining 10% to focus all 100% of resources on providing the best possible experience to each distinct Linux market ("ordinary joe user", "cutting-edge leet", "crusty conservatives", "lower-power boxes"). But good luck trying to get any Linux desktop project to volunteer themselves as first for the chopping block. And so it goes.

Improved according to whom? Part of the benefit of the Linux ecosystem is the ability to do things differently. I, for one, would hate to lose the choice.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: That's life
by ggeldenhuys on Sun 17th Mar 2013 09:04 in reply to "That's life"
ggeldenhuys Member since:
2006-11-13

In fact, I like OSX exactly cuz it takes the best of both worlds. I have all the open source softwares I want, on a stable and solid OS (no OS/APIs fragmentation).

And exactly why I now use FreeBSD. No "distro" fragmentation, way more consistent configs, all open source, and very stable.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: That's life
by thesunnyk on Tue 19th Mar 2013 02:02 in reply to "That's life"
thesunnyk Member since:
2010-05-21

While you're right in the general case, one of the issues with Wayland / Mir specifically is that it needs an integrated driver stack in order to work. For Linux, you just write a driver for Linux -- there's no "incompatible Linux" per se.

The problem here is that companies like AMD, NVidia, and the PowerVR guys have had a single target: XFree86, then Xorg, and now Wayland. However, now they have two targets, and a choice: Support Wayland, Mir, or both. The Free Desktop + X guys have been working really hard to make it so that people can write this stuff once and the same code applies everywhere. However, Mir muddies the waters. This will mean slower drivers, or drivers that only work with one of the stacks. This is both annoying and unnecessary.

Reply Parent Score: 1