Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 7th May 2013 22:46 UTC
Windows "After acknowledging its Windows Blue codename publicly in March, Microsoft is getting closer to revealing all about the upcoming Windows 8 update. In an interview with The Verge this week, Microsoft's Windows CFO Tami Reller provided some details on where the company is heading with its Blue project."
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RE: ...
by UltraZelda64 on Tue 7th May 2013 23:32 UTC in reply to "..."
UltraZelda64
Member since:
2006-12-05

It is faster, you're right on that, but it's impossible to ignore that damn "charms" bar. Obnoxious thing. And that massive pop-up clock.

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[2]: ...
by WorknMan on Wed 8th May 2013 00:38 in reply to "RE: ..."
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

It is faster, you're right on that, but it's impossible to ignore that damn "charms" bar. Obnoxious thing. And that massive pop-up clock.


Actually, it isn't. Sometimes I see it when I close a window, but I don't even consciously see it anymore.

When it comes to Windows 8 and the missing Start button, I honestly do not understand what the problem is, even if you don't use Metro. To me, it's just a bunch of irrational hate. I think most people spent much more time bitching about the missing start menu than they would've just installing a free replacement and getting on with their lives.

At any rate, if you're still using the Start menu in 2013, you really are doing it the hard way. What I have been doing for years is to pin my most frequently launched apps on the quick launch toolbar (most people will use that shitty Win7 taskbar), and for everything else, I just hit Winkey and start typing, and it's selected in a second or two. And this is actually faster to do in Windows 8 than it was in 7. There's absolutely no reason to bring up the Start menu or the Metro start screen and manually start scanning for apps.

Edited 2013-05-08 00:39 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: ...
by WereCatf on Wed 8th May 2013 02:00 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

and for everything else, I just hit Winkey and start typing, and it's selected in a second or two. And this is actually faster to do in Windows 8 than it was in 7. There's absolutely no reason to bring up the Start menu or the Metro start screen and manually start scanning for apps.


That's your preference, but many people find it simply quite jarring for the Start screen to take over the whole desktop every single time you just want to open an app -- the old Start menu only covers a small portion of the screen and is quite a bit less jarring an experience. Also, searching for what you want to launch only works if you already know what it's called; the old Start menu is much more discoverable if you do not know or remember what to specifically search for.

Reply Parent Score: 12

RE[3]: ...
by edwdig on Wed 8th May 2013 02:43 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
edwdig Member since:
2005-08-22

It sounds like your needs are fairly simple. I've got my most frequently used things pinned to the task bar, with some common but less frequently used stuff pinned to the Start Menu.

The left side of the Start Menu is also great for things I don't use very often, but tend to go to a lot on the days I do need them.

The right side of the Start Menu is great for quick access to frequently access locations.

Start -> Switch User is great for shared computers.

For rarely used thing I don't know the exact name of, the Win 7 Start Menu is much faster to browse than the Metro Start Screen.

Ultimately, Win8 isn't completely broken. It does the job and I could work with it if necessary. The big problem is that it just doesn't do anything better than Win7, but does a lot of things worse.

Also, yes, I've heard people say Win8 is faster. If it is, it's not perceptibly so on a recent computer. If anything, to me, a fresh Win7 install feels faster than a fresh Win8 install. I suspect most of the supposed speed improvements are comparing a fresh install of Win8 to a several year old Win7 install.

Reply Parent Score: 9

RE[3]: ...
by UltraZelda64 on Wed 8th May 2013 06:59 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

Oh, trust me, I used to use the Quick Launch bar myself. But true to its name, it's good as a quick program launcher... and I don't need such immediate and frequent access to, for example, CCleaner or a disk defragmenter. I tended to keep my QL toolbar pretty minimal, typically housing only my five or six top-used programs, maybe eight at times. The rest were easily and still quite quickly started from the Start menu.

I have experimented here and there with cleaning out the menu (removing links to web pages, documentation, etc. and getting rid of extra directories in the menu tree) after seeing Linux's comparatively clean application menus. The Start menu worked just fine--I would hardly call it the "hard way." It works, and IMO it works well. Sure, it would be nice if it was cleaner by default (all that crap I mentioned removing, there is no need for every single software installer to create its own cascading menu entry for example), but still.

Similarly, I actually *liked* Windows 7's implementation of the taskbar, but I never considered it a real alternative or replacement of the Start menu. I would never have the entire thing lined from left to right full of program icons, that's just clutter. It's bad enough so many people seem to do that on their desktops with icons all over the place, the taskbar is not a good place to just shove everything either.

Edited 2013-05-08 06:59 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: ...
by andrewclunn on Wed 8th May 2013 16:09 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
andrewclunn Member since:
2012-11-05

Heaven forbid some people desire to operate their machine with a mouse and not use the keyboard for anything other than typing.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: ...
by silviucc on Wed 8th May 2013 18:12 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
silviucc Member since:
2009-12-05

You don't get what's so hard? Fine here are a few tidbits:

1) want to use the default OS supplied email client? Fullscreen app in your face
2) Want to view a PDF file? Another fullscreen app in your face
3) The same for calendar and web search.

These are just a few that popped in my face just in the first 10 minutes of using the "wonder OS". It is annoying. No, scratch that. It is pissing me off. Makes me scream. I do not want that on my friggin desktop. Nor do I want to install other applications to do the above when there are already programs with the same functionality on my system. There is no good reason why the PDF viewer and an email program and an IDE can't stand side by side on the same screen (provided the screen is big enough and it usually is for desktops)

All this so that MS can push their idiotic agenda. The "pie in the sky OS" to magically solve all their problems (like Ballmer being a moron).

They (MS) have not learned anything. In a NYT interview Mrs whatshername even insults desktop users by saying "we need to learn faster". WTF? It's not me that made Windows 8 a retarded OS, it's them. Don't shift your problems on to us.

Please MS, less marketing talk and more work fixing the mess you've made.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: ...
by galvanash on Wed 8th May 2013 23:52 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

When it comes to Windows 8 and the missing Start button, I honestly do not understand what the problem is, even if you don't use Metro. To me, it's just a bunch of irrational hate.


Personally, I think it has less to do with the start button being missing and more to do with WHY the start button is missing...

It wasn't done for technical reasons, it wasn't done to solve a problem, and it wasn't done to make users happy... It was done as a way to force users to adopt a new feature.

The problem is if you are going to force your users into doing something a different way, you better be damn sure most of them are going to like it...

They could have, from day one, made the start button, the charms bar, and everything that goes with it optional - that is patently obvious to anyone with two braincells to rub together. They didn't because they wanted to force user adoption...

Consumers know that most companies treat them like sheep. But they don't like it being made so blatantly obvious when they are being herded...

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: ...
by sgtarky on Sun 12th May 2013 00:17 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
sgtarky Member since:
2006-01-02

lol I gave up the start menu in 2012. i use a dock and finder

Reply Parent Score: 1