Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 14th Jun 2013 17:32 UTC
Microsoft From Bloomberg: "Microsoft, the world's largest software company, provides intelligence agencies with information about bugs in its popular software before it publicly releases a fix, according to two people familiar with the process. That information can be used to protect government computers and to access the computers of terrorists or military foes." The lid has officially been blown off.
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BallmerKnowsBest
Member since:
2008-06-02

"Buwahahahaha! Riiiiiiiiiiiight, the GFW is purely a defensive measure... I'm sure it has nothing to do with China being one of the most censorship-happy regimes in the industrialized world, not to mention their history of draconian control over what information their citizens can access. After all, we know that people in China can easily access sites with information about Tienanmen Square, or Tibetan/Taiwanese independence... oh, wait.


The inconvenient facts:

Tibet has been considered a part of China for over 2500 years. The Tibetan llamas ran a brutally repressive feudal system. Western supporters of Tibetan independence are essentially useful idiots. [In public the Dalai Llama hides his true opinions such as his absolute hatred of homosexuality.]
"

Red herring, that doesn't actually address any of the points I made or the ridiculous claim that I was responding to.

Many of the original inhabitants of North & South America were just as brutal (if not more so, ritual human sacrifice and all that)... and because of that, you would be OK if the US government blocked their citizens from accessing information about, say, the Trail of Tears?

Chinese citizens can travel freely to many Western countries.

There are daily flights between Taiwan and mainland China.

Hundreds of thousands of Chinese students study at western universities.

There is a great deal of robust online discussion and social networking in China.


Relevance?

Oh, and you left out another interesting fact: China is also second only to Russia when it comes to turning a blind eye to actual cybercrime, (just as long the crimes are only committed against westerners).

Six million Chinese citizens in Hong Kong have uncensored internet access.


In other words: the only way for Chinese citizens to avoid internet censorship is to live somewhere other than China. Noted.

Reply Parent Score: 3