Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 18th Sep 2013 17:42 UTC
Apple As most of you using iOS already know, iOS 7 has been released today. While you're all busy updating, I dove into some reviews of Apple's latest, and I think I like this conclusion by The Verge best.

Today, as it rolls out to users everywhere, iOS 7 is still on most levels the same operating system it's been for six years. Meanwhile Android has become a fun, efficient, flowing operating system that makes it easy to move data between apps, easy to share things, and easy to see only the information you need at the moment. Where iOS 7 still feels like jumping in and out of a series of apps, the best moments of using Android make it feel like a cohesive, unified platform. There's no question iOS 7 has the foundational strength to match that experience, but Apple has to throw open the doors and let its huge ecosystem build on that potential.

iOS has always been an excellent operating system, and iOS 7 remains an excellent operating system. But if Apple's goal was to match the power and flexibility of its rivals, iOS 7 feels very much like the beginning of a project rather than its conclusion.

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RE: Android vs iOS
by leos on Thu 19th Sep 2013 14:53 UTC in reply to "Android vs iOS"
leos
Member since:
2005-09-21

The main difference is that apps on Android can write to a file system that other apps can also access. So you can save a document with one app and easily open it from the same location with another (like a desktop OS). On iOS the app has to have registered a URI handler for other apps to send it files (and then it is a copy of that file, not a link to the original). Apple is pushing cloud storage over local filesystem access.

Edited 2013-09-19 14:54 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Android vs iOS
by jello on Thu 19th Sep 2013 20:36 in reply to "RE: Android vs iOS"
jello Member since:
2006-08-08

> On iOS the app has to have registered a URI handler
> for other apps to send it files (and then it is a
> copy of that file, not a link to the original).

From a security point of view what Apple is doing is more safe than what Android is doing.

For paranoia's sake avoiding cloud services would increase security as well... but people seem to enjoy these kind of services.

Reply Parent Score: 1