Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 23rd Feb 2015 17:44 UTC
Android

A U.S. federal judge has dismissed an antitrust lawsuit that charges Google harmed consumers by forcing Android handset makers to use its apps by default, but gave the plaintiffs three weeks to amend their complaint.

The two consumers who filed the suit failed to show that Google's allegedly illegal restrictive contracts on manufacturers of Android devices resulted in higher prices on phones, U.S. District Judge Beth Labson Freeman said in a Feb. 20 ruling.

Handset makers are free to release Android handsets without Google's applications, however, if you want one Google Android application, you got to have them all. I don't know if the latter is harmful in any way for consumers, but the plethora of insanely cheap - and sometimes, cheap and still really good - Android devices seems to contradict the complaint from the plaintiffs that it drives up prices.

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Comment by Drumhellar
by Drumhellar on Mon 23rd Feb 2015 17:57 UTC
Drumhellar
Member since:
2005-07-12

I'm okay with this. The existence of Google apps on a phone doesn't mean other apps are excluded, and just because Google is a large company doesn't mean you can automatically use their products without any concern for their interests.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Comment by Drumhellar
by WorknMan on Mon 23rd Feb 2015 18:43 in reply to "Comment by Drumhellar"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

I'm okay with this. The existence of Google apps on a phone doesn't mean other apps are excluded, and just because Google is a large company doesn't mean you can automatically use their products without any concern for their interests.


Yeah, and it's not like you can't compile Android from source and run it without any Google apps if you want, although I doubt very many people would actually want to, cuz Google apps in general are good ;)

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Comment by Drumhellar
by No it isnt on Mon 23rd Feb 2015 22:27 in reply to "Comment by Drumhellar"
No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

There was a case of Google not being to fond of (I believe) Samsung's plan to integrate a competing location service with their handsets.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by Drumhellar
by bassbeast on Wed 25th Feb 2015 09:45 in reply to "Comment by Drumhellar"
bassbeast Member since:
2007-11-11

Might want to read this Ars article, because it looks like Google is getting ready to pull a EEE on Android. Its a shame but it looks like Google is gonna end up just as nasty as MSFT in the 90s, I guess that is what they get for going public, now its all about keeping Wall street happy.

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2013/10/googles-iron-grip-on-android...

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Comment by Drumhellar
by Drumhellar on Wed 25th Feb 2015 18:32 in reply to "RE: Comment by Drumhellar"
Drumhellar Member since:
2005-07-12

That's an old article, and if IIRC, was thoroughly refuted on OSNews and in the Ars comments, in part by people that actually work on AOSP.

It's been more than a year since that article, and AOSP is still quite useful - Cyanogen is going strong, and Amazon's is doing fairly well (right?)

Reply Parent Score: 3