Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 11th Jan 2017 23:59 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems

That's where the company's new software tool Qbsolv comes in. Qbsolv is designed to help developers program D-Wave machines without needing a background in quantum physics. A few of D-Wave's partners are already using the tool, but today the company released Qbsolv as open source, meaning anyone will be able to freely share and modify the software.

"Not everyone in the computer science community realizes the potential impact of quantum computing," says Fred Glover, a mathematician at the University of Colorado, Boulder who has been working with Qbsolv. "Qbsolv offers a tool that can make this impact graphically visible, by getting researchers and practitioners involved in charting the future directions of quantum computing developments."

Thread beginning with comment 639562
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Link misspelled href
by number9 on Thu 12th Jan 2017 00:31 UTC
number9
Member since:
2005-10-25

It should be: https://www.wired.com/2017/01/d-wave-turns-open-source-democratize-q...

Do you do the html by hand? Wow.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Link misspelled href
by FlyingJester on Thu 12th Jan 2017 00:44 in reply to "Link misspelled href"
FlyingJester Member since:
2016-05-11

Given how almost all CMS systems are steaming bags of poop, or so inadequate you will still need to do significant amounts of HTML by hand, no reason not to.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Link misspelled href
by ssokolow on Thu 12th Jan 2017 01:06 in reply to "RE: Link misspelled href"
ssokolow Member since:
2010-01-21

Given how almost all CMS systems are steaming bags of poop, or so inadequate you will still need to do significant amounts of HTML by hand, no reason not to.


Still a surprise given that, if you're homegrowing your own CMS as I remember to be the case with OSNews, you already understand the codebase well enough to at least slap something like a Markdown parser onto the input stage to make that kind of issue more difficult to overlook.

(Of course, this is OSNews, which has had a problem with generating broken markup related to nested quoting for as long as I can remember.)

I'm actually in the middle of renovating my cruftiest old hobby codebase still in active use because, while it may be a static templater that's been superceded by Jekyll in every other way, it has one component I'd like to retain: Glue code to perform offline validation of all CSS, HTML, and XML (eg. RSS) that it generates, plus an incomplete (local only, no fragment references) but also offline checker for broken links.

Reply Parent Score: 2