Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 18th Oct 2017 10:42 UTC
Apple

I was in the Grand Central Station Apple Store for a third time in a year, watching a progress bar slowly creep across my computer's black screen as my Genius multi-tasked helping another customer with her iPad. My computer was getting its third diagnostic test in 45 minutes. The problem was not that its logic board was failing, that its battery was dying, or that its camera didn't respond. There were no mysteriously faulty innerworkings. It was the spacebar. It was broken. And not even physically broken - it still moved and acted normally. But every time I pressed it once, it spaced twice.

"Maybe it's a piece of dust," the Genius had offered. The previous times I'd been to the Apple Store for the same computer with the same problem - a misbehaving keyboard - Geniuses had said to me these exact same nonchalant words, and I had been stunned into silence, the first time because it seemed so improbable to blame such a core problem on such a small thing, and the second time because I couldn't believe the first time I was hearing this line that it was not a fluke. But this time, the third time, I was ready. "Hold on," I said. "If a single piece of dust lays the whole computer out, don't you think that's kind of a problem?"

The keyboard on the MacBooks and MacBook Pros is an unmitigated disaster. In pursuit of thinness nobody else is looking for, Apple severely crippled its most important Mac product line - and that's even without taking the Touchbar into account.

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RE[7]: Apple has lost the plot
by darknexus on Fri 20th Oct 2017 12:17 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Apple has lost the plot"
darknexus
Member since:
2008-07-15

Sure they will, the same way they notice that Windows gets slower, or that their Android phone freezes up with a Google Maps crash. That doesn't mean they will care. They haven't, so far.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[8]: Apple has lost the plot
by nebakke on Mon 23rd Oct 2017 00:08 in reply to "RE[7]: Apple has lost the plot"
nebakke Member since:
2006-09-04

... That doesn't mean they will care. They haven't, so far.


It bears remembering that Windows, Android and google Maps, have the primary benefit of usually being the cheaper, more broadly available and useable option.
Those things are arguably stronger motivators than the issues the users experience. My willingness to put up with button issues on the keyboard, is a perfect opposite proportional to the amount of money I paid for the product.

Apple doesn't have that indemnification - so far they are relying heavily on the long-running 'halo effect' that their products have created.
I think the point made by the earlier poster, was that not only does Apple seem to have abandoned their focus on pretty, functional quality product, in favour of a 'pretty first" philosophy, with a price tag that pushes them even further into the top price bracket of the market. It is not unreasonable to question how long the halo effect will carry them before it comes crashing down. At some point, someone is likely to produce a phone or a tablet, which looks and feels "nicer(tm)" but costs half as much, if/when that happens, they're left without a fall-back plan, if they keep working the way they are now.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[8]: Apple has lost the plot
by RobG on Mon 23rd Oct 2017 21:15 in reply to "RE[7]: Apple has lost the plot"
RobG Member since:
2012-10-17

You may not have noticed, but the last few versions of Windows have each had reduced system requirement and run faster than the previous, at least since the abomination of Vista.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[9]: Apple has lost the plot
by zima on Wed 25th Oct 2017 10:42 in reply to "RE[8]: Apple has lost the plot"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

IIRC not quite, the official Windows requirements were mostly constant, with a bump from 1 to 2 GiB of minimum RAM for Win10 32bit.

And Vista wasn't that bad, it laid the groundwork for universally loved Win7, which was basically "Vista SE"...

Reply Parent Score: 2