Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 25th Oct 2017 21:58 UTC
Android

Today we're giving you an early look at Android 8.1. This update to Android Oreo includes a set of targeted enhancements including optimizations for Android Go (for devices with 1GB or less of memory) and a new Neural Networks API to accelerate on-device machine intelligence. We've also included a few smaller enhancements to Oreo in response to user and developer feedback.

Android 8.1 while literally nobody is even using Android 8.0 yet. OK Google, OK.

Coinciding with the Android 8.1 developer preview, Google also released Android Studio 3.0.

This release of Android Studio is packed with many new updates, but there are three major feature areas you do not want to miss, including: a new suite of app profiling tools to quickly diagnose performance issues, support for the Kotlin programming language, and a new set of tools and wizards to accelerate your development on the latest Android Oreo APIs.

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RE: Literally?
by Thom_Holwerda on Thu 26th Oct 2017 07:56 UTC in reply to "Literally?"
Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

I suspect you are misusing the word 'literally'. Or perhaps you think I'm a literal nobody-- which is odd, because I thought I was a literate nobody. ;)


https://developer.android.com/about/dashboards/index.html

0.2% is, indeed, nobody. I'm glad you're part of the 0.2%, but the vast majority of Android users running outdated software is not only a huge security threat, but also a huge problem for developers who can't target all the latest features for their apps. While Google does certainly take measures to mitigate the latter, the former is still a massive problem, even after 8 years of Android.

And since it'll take years and years for Treble to make any form of a splash - if it even does at all, since it's not a silver bullet at all - this situation seems unlikely to change.

Just because you're part of the 0.2% doesn't mean the problem magically goes away.

Edited 2017-10-26 07:56 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Literally?
by pmac on Thu 26th Oct 2017 09:20 in reply to "RE: Literally?"
pmac Member since:
2009-07-08

Thom, I think you have a problem admitting when you're wrong. I agree with you on this whole issue, but you did misuse the word "literally", and to deny your mistake weakens the rest of your argument. If you refuse to accept that you're wrong, it hints at your having a closed mind, which just gives the impression that you're spouting nonsense from a soapbox. If you admit you're wrong then it shows that your opinion is reasoned, and adjusts to new information. I think you have a real problem with this, and you would become an even better journalist if you took this advice. Just saying, and meant as friendly advice. Take it or leave it.

(This is a general thing I've noticed, and isn't solely about "literally").

Edited 2017-10-26 09:24 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: Literally?
by Thom_Holwerda on Thu 26th Oct 2017 09:25 in reply to "RE[2]: Literally?"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

"Literally" has two uses - not just the one you're referring to, but also as a means to create more emphasis.

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/literally

":in effect :virtually —used in an exaggerated way to emphasize a statement or description that is not literally true or possible"

This is a pretty widely accepted use of the term "literally", even if some people are vehemently opposed to such usage.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Literally?
by Morgan on Thu 26th Oct 2017 15:32 in reply to "RE[2]: Literally?"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

If you admit you're wrong then it shows that your opinion is reasoned, and adjusts to new information.


Something tells me that if Thom were to admit he was wrong (not saying he is wrong here, just saying in general) you would jump on it and call him "wishy washy" or say something like "how can we believe this guy, he doesn't stand behind his own words!"

Some people are simply never satisfied.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Literally?
by ahferroin7 on Thu 26th Oct 2017 12:16 in reply to "RE: Literally?"
ahferroin7 Member since:
2015-10-30

OK, so there's an issue with updates. Google is working on that, even if it will take years. Stalling development of the upstream code just because the number of people who are running the newest version is less than some arbitrary threshold isn't going to help either, and in fact, could make things worse.

You wouldn't stop releasing security patches just because almost nobody has the most recent one, so why should you stop general development?

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Literally?
by CaptainN- on Thu 26th Oct 2017 15:20 in reply to "RE[2]: Literally?"
CaptainN- Member since:
2005-07-07

Except it's not a problem on either of Thom's gripes - old versions of Android can use new Android APIs because that's how the SDK works, and older vendor tied "distros" (for lack of a better term) do receive updates...

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Literally?
by CaptainN- on Thu 26th Oct 2017 15:18 in reply to "RE: Literally?"
CaptainN- Member since:
2005-07-07

Old versions of Android can use new APIs, because that's how the SDK works... You really are being stubborn on this one.

Maybe security updates are a problem, but my old devices do receive security updates, and most of the important sub-systems (like webviews) are updated through the play store anyway.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Literally?
by kurkosdr on Fri 27th Oct 2017 00:23 in reply to "RE: Literally?"
kurkosdr Member since:
2011-04-11

Ff

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Literally?
by kurkosdr on Fri 27th Oct 2017 00:24 in reply to "RE: Literally?"
kurkosdr Member since:
2011-04-11

Just because you're part of the 0.2% doesn't mean the problem magically goes away.


I am still not convinced instant upgrades to new majors are a problem in need of solving. How many people upgraded to Windows 7 months after launch?

Nerds dream of a utopia were new major versions of the Android OS arrive instantly on all existing devices, but the market has shown loud and clear it just doesn't care. Yet people like Thom will get on their soapbox and scream "it's a problem! It's a problem! The GreenBot died for our sins and those OEMs are disrespecting its holiness".

If the market considered instant upgrades to new major versions of the Android OS a real problem, most people would be using Pixels and Nexuses. Yet they buy Galaxies.

If you Thom consider instant upgrades to new major versions of the Android OS a real problem, stop being cheap and buy a Pixel (Nexuses will get their last version upgrade with 8.1), and be glad your niche is served.

Now security updates are an issue, major OEMs (bar HTC) have committed to monthly updates for 24 months or so, and that's not good enough.

But whining about not getting a free upgrade that was never promised to you? Oh dear.

Edited 2017-10-27 00:25 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5