Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 28th Jan 2006 16:50 UTC, submitted by Dr. No
Windows This is already a fairly old article, but I'm pretty confident it never made OSNews' front page. In this article, the author proves that Windows XP can be installed, and 'run', on processors with as little as 8MHz. "The target of this project was to find the weakest system where you can run Windows XP. Keep in mind, that Microsoft official requirements are a CPU with 233 MHz an 64 MB of RAM. But that had to be beaten!"
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DeadFishMan
Member since:
2006-01-09

There is a certain registry tree you can delete to force it to auto-redetect hardware after a motherboard type swap. Doesn't always work but it hasn't failed me personally yet. Actually, in every instance I've done a mobo/proc swap the systems booted. it complained, and took two or three reboots to install all the drivers (automatically expect network/video obviously)

Neat trick. I'll research more for it as I needed something like this one of these days. It could prevent me from hosing my WinXP setup when I switched the mobo.

Haven't had the same luck with Linux. It ate my desktop once. hehe. No disrespect to Linux (i use it daily)

It's the exact opposite to me. Linux seems to be more tolerant to hardware changes. Most distros run by default some sort of hardware detection during boot (ala kudzu) that changes system settings accordingly to the respective hardware changes. Mepis survived flawlessly my mobo change. Windows XP didn't.

Reply Parent Score: 1

dsmogor Member since:
2005-09-01

XP seems to have number of kernels tuned for particular CPU/MOBO combinations on its installation cd. They are selected during installation but, I guess, can't be changed afterwards.

Reply Parent Score: 1

makfu Member since:
2005-12-18

"XP seems to have number of kernels tuned for particular CPU/MOBO combinations on its installation cd. They are selected during installation but, I guess, can't be changed afterwards."

1. The HAL/kernel combo's are specific to 6 different scenarios on 32bit:

Standard PC - (Non ACPI/Non MP capable)
MPS Uniprocessor PC - (Non ACPI/MP capable w/1 CPU core at install time)
MPS Multiprocessor PC - (Non ACPI/MP capable with 2+ CPU's)
Advanced Configuration and Power Interface PC (ACPI/Non MP capable)
ACPI Uniprocessor PC (ACPI/MP capable with 1 CPU core or HT disabled at install time)
ACPI Multiprocessor PC (ACPI/MP capabe with 2+ CPU cores or HT enabled at install time).

2. You can change the HAL/Kernel combo quite easily through the device manager.

Reply Parent Score: 1