Unix Archive

Fiwix 0.3.1 Released

GNU/Fiwix is a 32-bit x86 operating system kernel based on the Unix architecture and fully focused on being Linux compatible. It is designed exclusively for educational purposes, so the kernel code is kept as simple as possible for the benefit of students. In the latest version, the virtual memory manager code has been improved to support SVGAlib-based applications and to add the ability to mmap() physical addresses. The way to map physical addresses in the /dev/mem driver has been improved. The mmap() and readpage() methods have been added to the VFS structure. Among other improvements in the VFS layer, the code to build with gcc 4.x has been fixed.

Learn How UNIX Multitasks

"On UNIX systems, each system and end-user task is contained within a process. The system creates new processes all the time and processes die when a task finishes or something unexpected happens. Here, learn how to control processes and use a number of commands to peer into your system."

Share Application Data with UNIX System V IPC Mechanisms

"The UNIX operating system provides a rich set of features that allows processes to communicate with each other. Known as Inter-Process Communication, you can use this communication method to reconfigure an application at run time or to share data between different processes that are running in parallel. This article teaches you how to identify the methods that applications can use to communicate with each other, select the most appropriate method for your application, and begin your implementation."

HP Battens Down HP-UX

"HP this week moved to bulk up the security tools available with its HP-UX operating system. The company has released an assortment of additions for HP-UX 11i V2 - including server-side encryption, a security chip and fortified data containers - that give customers some nice, high-end options. HP officials bragged that a number of the new tools arrive at no additional cost to customers. In addition, HP insisted that we remind you of its 'commitment to the long-term success of the HP-UX roadmap'."

Resolve Memory Leaks Using AIX 5.3

Memory leaks can be tough and costly problems to solve, so it makes sense to use good tools to clearly point out and understand where the leaks are coming from. This article outlines an approach you can use while tackling memory leaks, and it discusses how to take advantage of the MALLOCDEBUG tool that is supplied with AIX.

Setting and Managing Permissions on UNIX

UNIX provides robust tools and infrastructure so that you can both protect and share information. This article looks at user privileges and, in particular, examines how to manipulate file permissions to restrict or share your directories and files with others. Understanding permissions is crucial if you want to speak UNIX fluently. Learn how to manipulate file permissions to protect your files, or share them with others.

Standardising UNIX Command-Line Tools

"Examine methods for standardizing your interface to simplify movements between different UNIX systems. If you manage multiple UNIX systems, particularly in a heterogeneous environment, then the hardest task can be switching between the different environments and performing the different tasks while having to consider all of the differences between the systems. This article does not cover specific differences, but you'll look at ways that can provide compatible layers, or wrappers, to support a consistent environment."

Unix: An 800 Pound Gorilla No More?

Organizations adopting Linux might not abandon Unix entirely. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, for example, has migrated its e-mail system from Sun hardware and Solaris to HP servers and Red Hat Enterprise Linux. But even though the use of Linux on production servers is growing, the practice isn't yet the norm at the laboratory, said Douglas Hughes, a service engineer at JPL Information Services.

Retool Your Linux Skills for Commercial UNIX

Examine how to best migrate your Linux skills to take advantage of AIX and Solaris. Linux is all the rage, but what if you have experience in Linux and need to apply it to a commercial UNIX environment? UNIX and Linux are similar, and many of the same principles exist; there is a shell, root is still all powerful, and many of the tools and applications are the same. This tutorial will show you how to cope and understand the nuances and differences.