Linked by Eugenia Loli on Sat 24th Mar 2007 18:55 UTC, submitted by irbis
X11, Window Managers "The Compiz and Beryl teams are discussing a merger. Posts on the Compiz forum and Beryl mailing list indicate that the projects are discussing how to execute a merger and work together to deliver a single compositing window manager to give 'bling' to the Linux desktop."
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apoclypse
Member since:
2007-02-17

You cant' really blame Linux for a winmodem not working properly, You have to put the blame on the hardware manufacturer. The same for software not running in Linux, the blame goes to the developers of that software for not porting their software. The hardware thing is always why people seem to say that Linux is not ready for the desktop, yet OSX runs on far less hardware and yet it is considered ready for the desktop. Linux supports far more hardware out of the box than both macosx and windows. Windows supports very little hardware when first installed, Linux supports all types of hardware that will usually just work right out of the box without having to install a whole bunch of drivers from all over the internet or having the install cds. If you are going to say Linux is not ready for the desktop please do it on something that Linux doesn't do better than the other dekstop systems out there. Say Linux is not ready for the desktop because they lack 3rd party support or Linux is not ready for the desktop because the Gnome/KDE/XFCE doesn't cut it as a GUI. This whole hardware thing is just old and tired and is not true for the most part, because out of the box Linux supports more hardware than the other players in town. Now when OSX is running on all kinds of x86 hardware, we'll see how well they do. When windows installs my video card drivers by default then I'll say Linux is not ready for the desktop. Otherwise you can't really blame Linux because you can't run photoshop, or can't use a WINmodem, talk to Adobe or the manufacturer who was stupid enough to create hardware that relies so heavily on one OS.

Edited 2007-03-25 05:48

Reply Parent Score: 5

drfelip Member since:
2005-07-06

The difference with hardware for Mac is that Mac users know where to buy hardware for Mac, but Linux users don't. Sites reviewing hardware and testing it on several popular Linux distros, and online stores selling Linux-ready hardware, would be very useful for end users. Maybe even a "Linux ready" branding or certification would be good for both Linux and hardware manufacturers. So if something works out of the box on Linux, anybody could find it easily. I'm aware that some distros provide a list of compatible hardware, but those are usually incomplete. There is a lot of work to be made in this area.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Morin Member since:
2005-12-31

> The hardware thing is always why people seem to say that Linux is not
> ready for the desktop, yet OSX runs on far less hardware and yet it is
> considered ready for the desktop.

That's entirely correct, but you don't go to a store and buy OSX for your computer. You buy a Mac/iBook/whatever and OSX works on it, because much effort has been put into this combination to work.

> If you are going to say Linux is not ready for the desktop please do it
> on something that Linux doesn't do better than the other dekstop
> systems out there.

Linux is presented as an OS that runs on generic PCs or notebooks, yet on many of them something doesn't work. Many have pointed out that if you carefully select your hardware for Linux, then it will work fine (which is no surprise given the amount of hardware it *does* run fine on). What we need is more shops doing hardware selection and pre-installing Linux (maybe even a fine-tuned specialized version of some distro) and selling this as a complete package to end-users, much like Apple does. Add to that a good selection of software, *not* choice! Choice is good for the system builders, but not for the end users. They want one name they can trust.

And I'm not talking about Dell here, but the "little ones" who are far more flexible.

Reply Parent Score: 3

apoclypse Member since:
2007-02-17

In that I agree with you wholeheartedly. The thing is that there are already companies who do this but the Linux community rather bang on Dell's door to be let into the party rather than getting one from a Linux specific manufacturer like Sytem76.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Gooberslot Member since:
2006-08-02

The problem is that when hardware isn't supported out of the box it's far harder on Linux to get it working. Some of that is due to lack of manufacturer support but the kernel developers certaintly don't make their jobs easy.

Reply Parent Score: 1

apoclypse Member since:
2007-02-17

i don't see how it can be easier. As a manufacturer provide decent specs and the community will write the driver themselves. If you are afraid of showing your specs to the world, the kernel devs have agreed to sign NDA agreements and still will write the driver for you. I don't see the how much easier it can get.

Edited 2007-03-26 15:57

Reply Parent Score: 1