Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 19th Aug 2009 09:21 UTC
Windows Last week we talked about what Linux (well, okay, X) could learn from Windows Vista and Windows 7, focusing on the graphics stack. A short article over at TechWorld lists seven things Windows 7 should learn from the Linux world. Some of them are spot-on, a few are nonsensical, and of course, and I'm sure you have a few to add too.
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RE: a bit of everything
by JohnFlux on Wed 19th Aug 2009 12:54 UTC in reply to "a bit of everything"
JohnFlux
Member since:
2007-01-04

I recently changed the motherboard in my computer and Windows refused to boot.

It turns out that Windows can't properly detect hardware changes - yet linux can.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: a bit of everything
by anduril on Wed 19th Aug 2009 14:09 in reply to "RE: a bit of everything"
anduril Member since:
2005-11-11

If you changed chipsets in the board swap, primarly the drive interface (from IDE to SATA, or from ICH7 to SB700) then whoops...you did it wrong. The OS cant load if it doesnt have drivers to...well, load itself. Its pretty easy to do a full board swap in Windows you just uninstall some drives. Turn the PC off. Swap out, boot up and done. Its how I've upgraded my parents pc with the same install of windows for five years.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: a bit of everything
by Brendan on Wed 19th Aug 2009 14:15 in reply to "RE: a bit of everything"
Brendan Member since:
2005-11-16

Hi,

I recently changed the motherboard in my computer and Windows refused to boot.

It turns out that Windows can't properly detect hardware changes - yet linux can.


For some versions of Windows (I'm not too sure if it's only OEM versions or what), you are only allowed to change 3 pieces of hardware before the OS decides it's running on a "different" computer (rather than the computer it should be running on), and then refuses to boot because of that. If you change the motherboard, then chances are you changed memory, CPU, hard disk controllers, USB controllers, ethernet, onboard sound, etc (they're all counted as separate devices), so you went past the "3 changes" limit.

If this is the case, then reinstall Windows from scratch and it'll probably detect everything.

-Brendan

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: a bit of everything
by phoenix on Wed 19th Aug 2009 15:55 in reply to "RE[2]: a bit of everything"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

Hi,

"I recently changed the motherboard in my computer and Windows refused to boot.

It turns out that Windows can't properly detect hardware changes - yet linux can.


For some versions of Windows (I'm not too sure if it's only OEM versions or what), you are only allowed to change 3 pieces of hardware before the OS decides it's running on a "different" computer (rather than the computer it should be running on), and then refuses to boot because of that. If you change the motherboard, then chances are you changed memory, CPU, hard disk controllers, USB controllers, ethernet, onboard sound, etc (they're all counted as separate devices), so you went past the "3 changes" limit.

If this is the case, then reinstall Windows from scratch and it'll probably detect everything.
"

It doesn't "refuse to boot", it just pops up a screen saying you've changed a lot of hardware, and it needs to be reactivated. You read a bit of text, make sure you have a network connection, and click a couple buttons. 30 seconds later, you're back in a working Windows install.

I just went through this with Windows XP on my mom's computer. Windows would BSOD on normal startup, but worked in Safe Mode. Removed all the non-generic chipset drivers, moved the harddrive into another computer, booted, re-activated, waited for all the new hardware to be detected and drivers installed, and was able to fix the issue.

Then did the process again to move the drive back into the original computer.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: a bit of everything
by BluenoseJake on Wed 19th Aug 2009 17:14 in reply to "RE: a bit of everything"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

I've had the opposite happen, I've changed the MB in a computer that dual booted Debian Etch and Windows XP, and Etch kernel panicked on the way up, XP trundled along, the screen flashed a few times, and it managed to allow me to login.

After login, it continued to grind, then it said it was finished installing new hardware, and wanted me to reboot. When it was done rebooting, XP ran fine. I had to reinstall Etch.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: a bit of everything
by leech on Thu 20th Aug 2009 07:02 in reply to "RE[2]: a bit of everything"
leech Member since:
2006-01-10

I've had the opposite happen, I've changed the MB in a computer that dual booted Debian Etch and Windows XP, and Etch kernel panicked on the way up, XP trundled along, the screen flashed a few times, and it managed to allow me to login.

After login, it continued to grind, then it said it was finished installing new hardware, and wanted me to reboot. When it was done rebooting, XP ran fine. I had to reinstall Etch.


Odd, considering you say this;

I've been using/administrating/developing Windows for about 20 years, and using/administrating Linux for about 10, and I have to say, other than exposing OS functionality through the filesystem, I have never found any real need for most of the stuff in your list with Windows.


That you didn't know you could just boot into a liveCD, chroot into the etch install, and reconfigure everything.

What part of Etch crashed? Just kernel panic, X die, what? I've switched hardware many times, and have never had such a problem. Generally if it crashes on a motherboard setup after a swap, then it just won't run on it at all (due to buggy hardware / driver or whatever) The fact that you were able to re-install on it says otherwise though. Could have just been a module option that was set that messed up on the new motherboard.

XP and pretty much all versions of Windows that have any sort of 'Plug and Play' have had the issue of either being completely unstable after a major hardware swap, or simply don't work.

One thing that could have messed up your Debian install was AHCI vs Legacy. AHCI has been kind of a harsh nail for all operating systems (for example, to get AHCI support in Windows at all you have to reinstall to use it, but for the most part it'll emulate the legacy mode, which Linux doesn't seem to like too much.)

Reply Parent Score: 2