Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 25th Nov 2009 17:57 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu At the Ubuntu Developer Summit, which took place last week, it was announced that the next release of the Ubuntu Linux distribution, version 10.04, will no longer carry the GIMP in its default installation. This actually touches upon somethin I've been wanting to talk about, a problem that plagues both Linux and Mac OS X: Paint.NET is Windows-only.
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Agree 100%
by massysett on Wed 25th Nov 2009 20:26 UTC
massysett
Member since:
2007-12-04

Years ago I posted on Linux forums saying that I was looking for a really simple image editor. As I put it, "I am looking for the nano of image editors, not the Emacs or Vim of image editors."

My needs are basic: just crop an image, resize it, maybe mess with the colors a bit, or take the resolution down a few notches so it will fit on a webpage without taking forever to download. GIMP can do all that, but wow is it complicated.

I'm surprised nobody has come up with such a simple program.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Agree 100%
by nt_jerkface on Wed 25th Nov 2009 20:33 in reply to "Agree 100%"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

I'm surprised nobody has come up with such a simple program.


Yea you would think that at the very least someone would fork the gimp and make it more like paint shop pro.

The underlying problem is that Linux has a vocal advocate to skilled developer ratio of about 1 million to 1.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Agree 100%
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Thu 26th Nov 2009 18:27 in reply to "RE: Agree 100%"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

No offense, but Paint Shop Pro? Ugh. Its like the Delphi of the graphics world.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Agree 100%
by david g on Wed 25th Nov 2009 20:51 in reply to "Agree 100%"
david g Member since:
2005-07-08
RE: Agree 100%
by bralkein on Wed 25th Nov 2009 20:59 in reply to "Agree 100%"
bralkein Member since:
2006-12-20

KDE's Kolourpaint seems to do all of the things you ask for. It is available as part of the kdegraphics package. I don't think it does all of the things Thom wants, others have mentioned Krita from KOffice as perhaps being better suited to that kind of thing.

It would be kinda useful to have something at the same level as Paint.NET, but to me it's not a major big deal compared to some of the other issues outstanding on the Linux desktop.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Agree 100%
by another_sam on Thu 26th Nov 2009 20:46 in reply to "RE: Agree 100%"
another_sam Member since:
2009-08-19

I would also choose Kolourpaint.

About its Qt GUI, two options:
1. How much do the basic KDE libraries to run Kolourpaint weight? If it isn't that much, they could be shipped with Ubuntu.
2. How much would cost to port Kolourpaint to GTK+? Could it be done by more than a person at a time? I think the problem is relevant enough to, if it makes sense, assign several people to work on it.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Agree 100%
by lemur2 on Wed 25th Nov 2009 22:54 in reply to "Agree 100%"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Years ago I posted on Linux forums saying that I was looking for a really simple image editor. As I put it, "I am looking for the nano of image editors, not the Emacs or Vim of image editors." My needs are basic: just crop an image, resize it, maybe mess with the colors a bit, or take the resolution down a few notches so it will fit on a webpage without taking forever to download. GIMP can do all that, but wow is it complicated. I'm surprised nobody has come up with such a simple program.


Digikam includes a fast, basic, simple-to-use image editor that has all those features:

http://www.digikam.org/drupal/about?q=about/features

Fast image editor with keyboard shortcuts and basic photo editing/management features
without losing metadata. Features available in Image editor are:
16 bits image color depth support.
RAW camera image support.
Color Management support.
Red eyes correction
Brightness / Contrast / Gamma correction
Hue / Saturation / Luminosity correction
Color balance
Invert colors
Color auto-correction tools: Normalize / Equalize / Auto levels / Stretch Contrast
Blur / Sharpen
EXIF/MakerNote/IPTC/GPS viewer
Histogram viewer
ICC profile viewer
Ratio-cropping with proportion aids and composing tools based on Fibonacci rules
Free cropping
Exporting to another image format
Printing images
Removing images from current Album
Image comments editing
Image file properties
Black and White and tonality converter using curves adjustments
Rotation
Flipping
Zooming
ICC profiles tool to perform advanced color corrections into images
X X
digiKam image editor uses a plugins architecture to add new features.
See blow a list of extra tools available:
Adjust levels : a tool to adjust the photograph histogram levels manually
Adjust curves : a tool to adjust the photograph colors using curves
Noise Reduction : noise filter based on dcamnoise2 algorithm
Unsharp Mask : a photograph unsharp mask filter to unblur picture without increase noise
Lens Distortion : a tool for correct lens spherical aberration on photograph
Anti Vignetting : a tool for correct vignetting on photograph
Channel Mixer : a tool to mix the photograph color channels
White Balance : a tool to adjust white color temperature balance of photograph
Photograph Inpainting : a tool to remove unwanted photograph area using CImg library
Photograph Refocus : a sharpness editor to refocus a photograph
Hot Pixels Correction : a tool to remove photograph hot pixels generated by a deficient camera
Photograph Restoration : a tool to reduce photograph artifacts using CImg library
Free Rotation : a plugin to rotate a photograph with a free angle in degrees
Shear Tool : a plugin to shear a photograph horizontally and vertically
Perspective Tool : a plugin to adjust the photograph perspective
Blowup Photograph : a plugin to blowup a photograph without less image quality using CImg library
Template Superimpose : a tool to superimpose a template on photograph
Add Border : a tool to add decorative frame around a photograph
Insert Text : a tool to insert text under a photograph
Apply Texture : a tool to apply a decorative texture to a photograph
Solarize : a tool to solarize a photograph
Oil Paint : simulate oil painting on photograph
Emboss : an effect filter to emboss photograph
Rain Drops : adding the visual effect of raindrops on photograph
Charcoal : simulate charcoal drawing on photograph
Film Grain : simulate film grain on photograph
Infrared : simulate infrared film effect on photograph
Blur FX : apply blurring special effects on photograph
Distortion FX : apply distortion special effects on photograph

Reply Parent Score: 0

lemur the FOSS salesmen at it again
by nt_jerkface on Thu 26th Nov 2009 00:38 in reply to "RE: Agree 100%"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

spamming the thread when a simple summary would have been adequate.

Edited 2009-11-26 00:39 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Agree 100%
by KenP on Thu 26th Nov 2009 00:43 in reply to "RE: Agree 100%"
KenP Member since:
2009-07-28

The funny thing is Canonical is getting into a sticky situation. They have to either:
1. Use Mono and all its problems (no matter what Miguel and Co. would like us to believe)
2. Use a KDE-based application, which are aplenty (as seen by numerous posts above).

Finally, its boiling down to -- do we really need default Ubuntu+GNOME at all as the flagship product? Why not switch to Kubuntu+KDE4 and apply all those paper-cuts and tweaks that they do with the GNOME one so we can have the top of the range applications running without apology ...

Amarok
K3B
Digikam

Why in the world can't they switch to using Kubuntu as their default offering and tweaking it to make it user-friendly? 10 iterations with Ubuntu+GNOME has not exactly set the Linux desktop on fire!

Edited 2009-11-26 00:45 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Agree 100%
by StychoKiller on Thu 26th Nov 2009 10:14 in reply to "Agree 100%"
StychoKiller Member since:
2005-09-20

Google "mtpaint". It's a lot simpler than GIMP and does the fundamental operations of cropping, resizing, etc.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Agree 100%
by lemur2 on Thu 26th Nov 2009 12:05 in reply to "RE: Agree 100%"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Google "mtpaint". It's a lot simpler than GIMP and does the fundamental operations of cropping, resizing, etc.


Perhaps too simple.

Krita is a reasonable compromise that most people should be able to use immediately:

http://ourlan.homelinux.net/qdig/KDE4_desktop/wine_glass_krita_kde4...

Straightforward enough to have a familiar GUI, powerful enough to handle things like transparency as shown.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Agree 100%
by mrstep on Thu 26th Nov 2009 14:37 in reply to "Agree 100%"
mrstep Member since:
2009-07-18

Years ago I posted on Linux forums saying that I was looking for a really simple image editor. As I put it, "I am looking for the nano of image editors, not the Emacs or Vim of image editors."

My needs are basic: just crop an image, resize it, maybe mess with the colors a bit, or take the resolution down a few notches so it will fit on a webpage without taking forever to download. GIMP can do all that, but wow is it complicated.

I'm surprised nobody has come up with such a simple program.


I understand you're saying Linux, but on the OS X side Preview will take care of all of that and can handle 16-bit per channel color depth (at least I've seen that with png format). You can also add annotations (text, shapes), but you can't actually add layers / adjustment layers / paint with various brushes / etc.

If Pixelmator supported non-destructive adjustment operations and some of the style options that PS has, I'd use it in a heartbeat since the interface seems so much nicer than PS. Not being able to adjust the exposure/style of a layer without it being permanent is too big of a constraint for me, but then again I'm using CS4 as a result so maybe I'm not the target audience.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Agree 100%
by sorpigal on Sun 29th Nov 2009 11:50 in reply to "Agree 100%"
sorpigal Member since:
2005-11-02

Kolourpaint will do many basic image operations and is of course a painting program, too. For more photo-specific operations there's showfoto.

Krita will do everything else.

I don't mean to advocate KDE over other options or anything, but the fact is that they have apps which target all levels of image manipulation.

If QT and GTK could coordinate a bit on shared color/theme information such that apps can 'pick up' at least the basics of the theme of each other's toolkits, that would help. If, then, a GTK or a QT app could be made to use the file dialog of whatever desktop the user prefers, that would go a long way. At that point who cares what toolkit was used to write the app? People making install CDs, sure, but nobody else.

Edited 2009-11-29 11:53 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2