Linked by snydeq on Sun 14th Nov 2010 21:05 UTC
Red Hat InfoWorld's Savio Rodrigues views Red Hat's notable marketing shift from low cost to high value as an "important shift in the ongoing evolution of open source software vendors' business models". Long left in the low-cost ghetto of enterprise IT mind share, RHEL is being pushed for its technical innovations, performance enhancements, and customer-requested improvements, rather than as a solution for cash-strapped shops. This shift, and the underlying improvements to RHEL 6.0, give Red Hat a legitimate shot against Microsoft, and open source a new model for competing with proprietary products. After all, focusing on low cost unnecessary limits the growth of open source business, creating a 'low-cost ceiling' that indirectly dissuades many IT shops from considering open source products.
Thread beginning with comment 449952
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE: The real threat is Oracle
by VistaUser on Mon 15th Nov 2010 00:19 UTC in reply to "The real threat is Oracle"
VistaUser
Member since:
2008-03-08

They have been trying this for the past few years and its not exactly worked out.

The problem Oracle face is similar to the one that Ubuntu faces in the enterprise - when you have problems, would you want to go get help from the people who actually did the work, wrote the software etc or some middle company who will then wait for a fix to arrive from elsewhere (Which Oracle MUST do anyway, as it wants to have 100% compatibility with RHEL.)

As for mixed source being a blessing, it can cut both ways - it may benefit the bottom line of a community, but as the people relying on Mysql or SUN products to see if they are happy with the results of their practices.

Reply Parent Score: 7

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

They have been trying this for the past few years and its not exactly worked out.


It doesn't have to work out in the short term, they have a safe profit generator called Oracle DB.

I wouldn't call it a failure either given the customer list they have built up.

They're playing a long term game and they have a much better plan than Red Hat.

Reply Parent Score: 2