Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 9th Oct 2013 21:47 UTC
Windows

Paul Thurrot has a number of rumours up about Windows Phone 8.1. Two stand out to me.

Where GDR3 is widely expected to support 5- to 6-inch screens, 8.1 will supposedly support 7- to 10-inch screens as well. This obviously infringes on Windows RT/8.x tablets, so it's not clear what the thinking is there.

So, Windows RT will become even more pointless than it already is.

Aping the iPhone navigation model, Microsoft will apparently remove the Back button from the Windows Phone hardware specification with 8.1. The Back button just doesn't make sense, I was told: Users navigate away from an app by pressing the Start button and then open a new app, just like they do on iPhone. And the "back stack" is ill-understood by users: Most don't realize what they're doing when they repeatedly hit the Back button.

This I am not happy with. The back button is my main navigational input in both Android and Windows Phone, and I miss it dearly in iOS.

I'm just hoping on performance improvements, still my biggest issue with Windows Phone. I used my HTC 8X for a few hours today, and I was stunned by just how slow everything is compared to Android 4.3. Of course, application quality is another huge issue, but there's little Microsoft can do to convince developers that their Windows Phone applications are more than just side projects done between serious work on Android and iOS.

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Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

YOU have been consistently wrong, I (and many with me) have been consistently right, and the evidence is here for all to see. Windows Phone was the wrong choice from day one; if it had been the right choice, they would not have had to sell their phone division off.

Ah, the evidence word again. Let's take a look.

YOU have been fearmongering about Nokia's eventual death for a long time.

Sept 2012 where they had until "early 2013"
http://www.osnews.com/story/26386/Elop_running_out_of_time_to_turn_...


Uhm, as usual, you fail at reading. That's a *link* to *another* article. I have made no such timetable.

Still, that prediction wasn't far off the mark - when did Microsoft buy Nokia's handset business, again? What year? Huh!

Oct 2012 when you posted about Q3 sales drop
http://www.osnews.com/comments/26478

In that post I called for caution and mentioned that it was a result of sunsetted carrier commitments and impending devices. Everyone else was fearmongering the imminent death (I believe you called for them to go back to Rubber Boots)


Exactly - a joke about their past. A refocus on a different product category. Which is... Exactly what they have done: sold off the losing, crippled division (handsets) and refocus on something good (the backend equipment). Hey, I was right.

January 2013 about Q4 2012 results
http://www.osnews.com/story/26686/Nokia_sold_4_4_million_Lumias_in_...

By the way, you're running out of time for Microsoft to release a Surface Phone. You called that, remember?


Yup. This is what I said in that link:

So yeah, I'm calling it: we're going to get a Surface phone this year. Samsung doesn't take Windows Phone 8 seriously, HTC is a deer caught in the headlights, and Nokia's 4.4 million devices aren't going to turn things around either. People simply aren't buying Windows Phone 8 devices right now, no matter how many millions of dollars of marketing HTC and Nokia are throwing around. It's probably time Microsoft took matters into its own hands.


Turns out, I'm right again! They did take matters into their own hands - they bought Nokia's handset division, did they not? - and the Surface phone is coming - the first true Micronokia product (their Moto X, if you will). It might not make it this year, since that's a little too soon - but again, I'm pretty close on the mark.

You, on the other hand, have continuously stated that Nokia is doing just fine, it's on the way up, it will make it, etc. etc. Yet, their modest growth in smartphone sales was below industry average, their feature phone business was falling apart, and in the end - they did NOT make it. DEspite your predictions to the contrary, Nokia was forced to sell of its failing handset business - which they did.

So, I ask you again: who was right all along here?

Edited 2013-10-10 14:31 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29


Uhm, as usual, you fail at reading. That's a *link* to *another* article. I have made no such timetable.

Still, that prediction wasn't far off the mark - when did Microsoft buy Nokia's handset business, again? What year? Huh!


And that's exactly what I talk about, this right here is indicative of what you've been doing all along. You rarely (if ever) state a position, then here, when apparently you don't according to you, despite you parroting a doom and gloom article, you decide to take credit for it anyway.



Exactly - a joke about their past. A refocus on a different product category. Which is... Exactly what they have done: sold off the losing, crippled division (handsets) and refocus on something good (the backend equipment). Hey, I was right.


Oh boy, that's a reach if I ever saw one.


Turns out, I'm right again! They did take matters into their own hands - they bought Nokia's handset division, did they not? - and the Surface phone is coming - the first true Micronokia product (their Moto X, if you will). It might not make it this year, since that's a little too soon - but again, I'm pretty close on the mark.


Obviously at that time (and not post-acquisition announcement) you said it in the vein of Microsoft announcing their own phone in contrast to the Lumia phones Nokia was offering, not as some kind of sage advice about Microsoft acquiring Nokia. Nice try though.

You're not close, you're way off.


So, I ask you again: who was right all along here?


I'm amused at your herculean effort to save face. You failed to see this entire thing coming. You haven't provided any proof that you ever called this thing. At all.

In fact, you've been consistently downbeat on Nokia (only to get proved wrong quarter after quarter, to the point where you went on multiple paragraph diatribes to rationalize away the positive Lumia shipments).

I *really*, really wish some of you had shorted Nokia stock during all this gloom and doom talk. I would've enjoyed taking your money.

Reply Parent Score: 3