Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 10th Apr 2006 20:49 UTC, submitted by jamesd
Oracle and SUN "Sun is preparing to release new Sunrays. The first is SunRay 2, it has one DVI connector for monitors, with the USB ports on the front, a much needed improvement, and an integrated stand. The second looks much like the first but comes with dual DVI outputs for dual headed setups." On a related note, Sun has laid off seven per cent of its SPARC processor and server group, as it pares back projects in an effort to save costs.
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a bit late...
by chekr on Tue 11th Apr 2006 00:44 UTC
chekr
Member since:
2005-11-05

Preparing to release?

have a look here:

http://syndicator.sun-catalogue.com/degermany/germanycontext" rel="nofollow">http://de.sun.com/catalog/?n-state=http://catalog.sun.com/productin...

you are a bit behind the times

Reply Score: 1

What are they pushing?
by hhcv on Tue 11th Apr 2006 01:37 UTC
hhcv
Member since:
2005-11-12

I couldn't tell from the site - what OS are people using at the other end of these thin clients? Is linux an option?

Reply Score: 1

RE: What are they pushing?
by zemplar on Tue 11th Apr 2006 01:52 UTC in reply to "What are they pushing?"
zemplar Member since:
2006-02-10

Solaris, Windows, Linux, ...pretty much anything.

Reply Score: 1

RE: What are they pushing?
by jamesd on Tue 11th Apr 2006 02:11 UTC in reply to "What are they pushing?"
jamesd Member since:
2006-01-17

The server is availible on either Solaris or Linux, With X grahpics are exported to the SunRay, you can run various vnc, and remote desktop type solutions on the ray so it can appear to be running any OS availible.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: What are they pushing?
by kaiwai on Tue 11th Apr 2006 03:00 UTC in reply to "RE: What are they pushing?"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

IIRC, doesn't SUN use a different protocol for their SUN Ray appliances? I know that Microsoft uses the Citrix winframe, but would SUN have licenced Citrix, as weird as it would be for the king of the NIH syndrome?

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: What are they pushing?
by zerblat on Tue 11th Apr 2006 07:41 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: What are they pushing?"
zerblat Member since:
2005-07-06

Well for one, Citrix's ICA protocol is pretty high level. Does it even work with anything else than Windows (on the server, that is)?

One of the main advantages of Sun Ray is that the clients are almost completely dumb and have no moving parts. The protocol they use is very low level, so there's practically no processing client-side. Basically, they're just sending the framebuffer over Ethernet. IOW more like VNC, but IIRC Sun Ray is actually older than VNC.

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: What are they pushing?
by darrenmoffat on Tue 11th Apr 2006 15:12 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: What are they pushing?"
darrenmoffat Member since:
2005-11-17

Sun Ray does remote audio and usb storage access as well.

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: What are they pushing?
by kaiwai on Tue 11th Apr 2006 18:13 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: What are they pushing?"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Well for one, Citrix's ICA protocol is pretty high level. Does it even work with anything else than Windows (on the server, that is)?

Not quite correct; there is Citrix Metaframe which is the Winframe equivilant by on UNIX, hence the curiosity as to whether SUN licenced the protocol in Metaframe instead of developing their own transport protocol.

One of the main advantages of Sun Ray is that the clients are almost completely dumb and have no moving parts. The protocol they use is very low level, so there's practically no processing client-side. Basically, they're just sending the framebuffer over Ethernet. IOW more like VNC, but IIRC Sun Ray is actually older than VNC.

True, they probably use quite a lot of recycled technology from the old Java thin clients they sold a while back (they looked like a small expresso machine).

Reply Score: 1

RE: RE: What are they pushing?
by hhcv on Tue 11th Apr 2006 04:03 UTC
hhcv
Member since:
2005-11-12

Ah ok.. I'm just thinking that the network load pushing 2 monitors worth of X information would be huge as soon as you have more than a few of these running!~ Even if you were using a hosted citrix application - the compression really wouldn't mean anything?

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: RE: What are they pushing?
by ormandj on Tue 11th Apr 2006 05:08 UTC in reply to "RE: RE: What are they pushing?"
ormandj Member since:
2005-10-09

Nope. I've done remote X sessions over 25kB/s links with only a slight delay/lag. It really isn't bad at all. On even a 100mbit you'd be able to cram a crapload of these things. Considering any modern server is going to be spitting out data at 1gbit, dump that into a switch and pass it out as you see fit. I bet you could cram a thousand users on that bandwidth wise. You'd probably run into cpu/ram/etc issues far before you hit network capacity.

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: RE: What are they pushing?
by kaiwai on Tue 11th Apr 2006 06:24 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: RE: What are they pushing?"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Nope. I've done remote X sessions over 25kB/s links with only a slight delay/lag. It really isn't bad at all. On even a 100mbit you'd be able to cram a crapload of these things. Considering any modern server is going to be spitting out data at 1gbit, dump that into a switch and pass it out as you see fit. I bet you could cram a thousand users on that bandwidth wise. You'd probably run into cpu/ram/etc issues far before you hit network capacity.

Going by the feedback I see on the SUN Blogs, there are end users who have SUN Ray appliances hooked up using a cable modem, so lets assume they compress it as well, end users have said that its like working on the network at SUN.

The problem as I see it, they need to drastically lower the cost of their appliancs, get it down to US$100-$150 per appliance; and heck, throw free SUN Ray appliances to customers who order the complete SUN Stack - both server and client end software.

Reply Score: 2

RenatoRam Member since:
2005-11-14

And if it is at all possible, go the NX route: FreeNX eliminate a lot of the overhead of the X protocol and has been tested on modem links. Just as being in front of the real thing.

Reply Score: 1

Sadly, its proprietary
by pip11 on Tue 11th Apr 2006 07:01 UTC
pip11
Member since:
2006-03-10

Unfortunately, the SunRAYs use a proprietary protocol for booting and server connection. It isn't just a layer on top of X, but a framebuffer that gets (I assume) compressed and pushed over the network. The server software runs on Linux and Solaris, but isn't free in any way, and the Rays are useless without. It's especially bad because there isn't any use for the Rays once they get dumped--there was a box of them at the UCSB surplus a few months back, and I'd pick one up if only as a cheap music player or something, but no go.

Reply Score: 2

Whoops...
by pip11 on Wed 12th Apr 2006 04:55 UTC
pip11
Member since:
2006-03-10

My knowledge was out of date...the protocol is still proprietary, but the Solaris and Linux server software is freely available (not open source though, at least not yet). I'll be picking up some SunRays tomorrow.

Reply Score: 1

Open source SunRay server software
by snotling on Wed 12th Apr 2006 09:57 UTC
snotling
Member since:
2006-04-12

I would say that it's the perfect moment to start a project to create an open source implementation of the SunRay server software (SRSS), at least with the basic functionalities.
It shouldn't be too difficult as there has already been some work done on trying to decode the protocol : see http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/sunray/ or http://www.leonerd.org.uk/sunray/ for example.
At last, I could use my SunRay @ home without the actual software beast that SRSS is, which I find very difficult to install and to configure :-)

Anyone ready to tackle this challenge ?

Reply Score: 1