Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 19th Jan 2009 15:01 UTC
General Development "Ars takes a close look at Seed, a new framework that allows software developers to build GTK+ applications with JavaScript. The popular web scripting language could soon become the dominant application extension language on the Linux desktop."
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why js?
by _xmv on Mon 19th Jan 2009 16:27 UTC
_xmv
Member since:
2008-12-09

it could change the way that GNOME programmers approach application development. JavaScript could be used as high-level glue for user interface manipulation and rapid prototyping while Vala or C are used for performance-sensitive tasks.

so.. nothing python or such couldn't do?

I personally find javascript hard and messy inc omparison

Reply Score: 4

RE: why js?
by fgxh298 on Mon 19th Jan 2009 17:36 UTC in reply to "why js?"
fgxh298 Member since:
2009-01-19

I agree with you. I believe they are targeting the large base of web and widget/gadget developers who already know JavaScript and just want to write small apps.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: why js?
by WorknMan on Mon 19th Jan 2009 23:26 UTC in reply to "RE: why js?"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

I agree with you. I believe they are targeting the large base of web and widget/gadget developers who already know JavaScript and just want to write small apps.


Yeah, I think so too. If I could learn one language and use it to build (small) desktop applications as well as web applications, even I would be interested in that. Of course, there's Java, but that's more of a full-blown programming language, whereas I'm thinking more along the lines of a dynamic scripting language. If you could program client-side web stuff with python, that would be the camel's nuts ;)

Edited 2009-01-19 23:27 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: why js?
by raboof on Mon 19th Jan 2009 21:56 UTC in reply to "why js?"
raboof Member since:
2005-07-24

In its current form, and given the way it's used (clumsily), the tasks it's being used for (mainly manipulating DOM trees) and the platform it's used on (browsers), sure, it's generally a mess.

However, work on the next version of javascript is ongoing, and promises some *very* compelling features (see for example http://lambda-the-ultimate.org/node/2504 : highlights for me are optional typing, and support for both nominal and structural types).

Reply Score: 1

One word
by shiny on Mon 19th Jan 2009 20:56 UTC
shiny
Member since:
2005-08-09

Plasma

:)

Reply Score: 4