Linked by Kroc Camen on Mon 21st Sep 2009 22:25 UTC
Mozilla & Gecko clones Last week, Mozilla started placing a warning message on its welcome page, seen by users after they upgrade Firefox to the latest version, informing the user if they have an out of date Flash Player. Now the stats have been crunched, and the result is that 10 million people have clicked the link, doing more than Adobe's own efforts to keep people up to date.
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by Hiev on Mon 21st Sep 2009 23:39 UTC
Hiev
Member since:
2005-09-27

Don't you love when an open source project do the job of a billionary company for free?

I spect a generous donation to the Mozilla project from you Adobe.

Reply Score: 3

RE: ...
by re_re on Tue 22nd Sep 2009 02:42 UTC in reply to "..."
re_re Member since:
2005-07-06

my god ... lol @ billionaires .......... do you really think it is in their best interest to be dishonest. Businesspeopel do not get wealthy by being dishonest, they get wealthy by producing a product that people need, trust, and understand, it is in the best interest of the business owner to produce the best product possible.... my god ....... you people are really ignorant thinking that businesses are out to get you. The capitalist makes he world go round. Mutual profit for you and the business at hand.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: ...
by merkoth on Tue 22nd Sep 2009 04:58 UTC in reply to "RE: ..."
merkoth Member since:
2006-09-22

And where did the OP say anything about dishonesty? And by the way, your definition about how the business world works might hold true for your country (Utopia, perhaps?) but there are many, many companies that make quite some money by screwing consumers and other companies without offering anything valuable; the patent trolls being a prime example.

Reply Score: 2

Adobe Updater
by FreakyT on Tue 22nd Sep 2009 00:07 UTC
FreakyT
Member since:
2005-07-17

Perhaps this will finally cause Adobe to realize how terrible their updater really is and fix it. I doubt it, though...

Personally, I think the best (third party) updaters I've seen are Google's silent one (as much as I dislike resident programs, Google did a pretty good job with it) and I also like the Firefox approach, where it downloads updates without asking and subsequently installs them automatically on the next program restart.

Reply Score: 2

WARNING: Offensive post
by dylansmrjones on Tue 22nd Sep 2009 00:10 UTC
dylansmrjones
Member since:
2005-10-02

Well, if users are that dumb, they deserve to receive and execute all kinds of evil viruses. And I'll rejoice!

(Well, I did post a warning)

Reply Score: 2

RE: WARNING: Offensive post
by Hiev on Tue 22nd Sep 2009 00:28 UTC in reply to "WARNING: Offensive post"
Hiev Member since:
2005-09-27

The last thing a user needs to be productive is to have to worry about security updates of every software he owns, that's why auto-updaters come handy.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: WARNING: Offensive post
by AlexandreAM on Tue 22nd Sep 2009 00:42 UTC in reply to "RE: WARNING: Offensive post"
AlexandreAM Member since:
2006-02-06

I think the OP was talking about the fact that clicking on a link on your home page instructing you to download an executable is somewhat dumb.

I mean, what if a site managed to set firefox's home page in disguise? But, to be honest, I think it would be unlikely, though I never actually thought about it until now.

So, the question I believe we should be asking is: How hard would it be to, from a web site (anything more and the attacker wouldn't really need to have you clicking the link, right?), to change a user's home page on Firefox?

10 million infected people from downloading what appears to be a mozilla recommendation is a dreadful scenario.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: WARNING: Offensive post
by phoenix on Tue 22nd Sep 2009 18:48 UTC in reply to "RE: WARNING: Offensive post"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

The last thing a user needs to be productive is to have to worry about security updates of every software he owns, that's why auto-updaters come handy.


A centralised update infrastructure is much nicer than a bunch of independent, always running, auto-updaters.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: WARNING: Offensive post
by marafaka on Wed 23rd Sep 2009 10:37 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: WARNING: Offensive post"
marafaka Member since:
2006-01-03

But it's not such a problem if yor trust is automated, and your system is bogged down by uncountable toolbars anyway.

C:\WINDOWS>portmaster -a
'portmaster' is not recognized as an internal or external command, operable program or batch file.

C:\WINDOWS>ups...

Reply Score: 2

RE: WARNING: Offensive post
by Brunis on Tue 22nd Sep 2009 08:17 UTC in reply to "WARNING: Offensive post"
Brunis Member since:
2005-11-01

Well, if users are that dumb, they deserve to receive and execute all kinds of evil viruses. And I'll rejoice!

(Well, I did post a warning)


It's in noone's interest that every user you consider dumb has any kind of virus!

Reply Score: 1

Comment by license_2_blather
by license_2_blather on Tue 22nd Sep 2009 04:15 UTC
license_2_blather
Member since:
2006-02-05

I somewhat sympathize with the "dumb user" comment, but in reality what "they" do affects all of us, directly or indirectly. Aside from that, it's not all the users' fault. I had to disinfect my boss's PC because he contracted a Flash-exploit virus from visiting CNN.com ( a 3rd-party ad provider had not appropriately vetted its content). He was desperate for my help as it was 2 days before he had to file his taxes.

Flash is just evil. Along with the 'sploits is the CPU-sucking performance because Adobe hasn't bothered to make it use the video decoding capabilities of modern GPUs. Yet I'm forced to use it because some vendor support sites insist on it. Freaking ridiculous. I hope HTML5 can displace the abomination that is Flash, but I'm not holding my breath.

@re_re: some business people do get wealthy by being dishonest. A few even get away with it. But that's no reason to throw the capitalist baby out with the bathwater.

Reply Score: 3

Finally!
by EmperoR on Tue 22nd Sep 2009 07:25 UTC
EmperoR
Member since:
2009-09-16

I've been waiting for this sort of fix for a LONG time. I have countless flash installers on my "Downloads" folder and it's starting to irritate me aswell, though when I had linux (Ubuntu 9.04) installed, my Firefox managed to fetch the flashplugins without actually visiting Abobe's homepage. I just had to agree to the licenceagreement and the browser got the plugin automatically. I'm not sure about updating the plugin though.

I am constantly trying out new operatingsystems and I have to install these flashplugins many times in a month, so it would be great to have this feature, regardless of the OS.

Edited 2009-09-22 07:26 UTC

Reply Score: 1

Comment by frood
by frood on Tue 22nd Sep 2009 10:04 UTC
frood
Member since:
2005-07-06

I remember the days when, if flash was not detected, the mozilla plugins dialog box would prompt you to install it and then download and install it for you. Nowadays it just takes you to the "manual install" page on adobe's website. What happened?

Reply Score: 2