Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 17th Mar 2010 23:19 UTC
Multimedia, AV "By encouraging more people to post videos in Wikipedia articles, we can bring theora video played in html5 to a very large audience. Currently, there are very few wikipedia articles that have videos. We hope that this campaign will bring thousands more to the site and show people how great theora can be. HTML 5 video, which plays without Flash, is a wonderful step towards a more open web - but if it depends on proprietary codecs like h.264, we will still be stuck with a gatekeeper for online video."
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Yeah, go!
by drstorm on Thu 18th Mar 2010 03:46 UTC
drstorm
Member since:
2009-04-24

Let us all spam Wikipedia, 'cause a good encyclopedia really needs piles of low quality (both in contents and technology) clips!

I don't like h.264 licensing, but you can't force stuff on people like that. If Theora ultimately fails it will be because of its inferiority. If it survives it will not be because of someone's religious war, but because it evolved and actually became better.

I always support superior technology and I'm pretty convinced that h.264 is better at the moment. In a long run it is always better for the superior technology to win. Even patents eventually expire.

If the superior tech always prevailed most of us would be using BeOS (or perhaps even GEOS) today...

Reply Score: 3

way wrong
by ciaran on Thu 18th Mar 2010 06:33 UTC in reply to "Yeah, go!"
ciaran Member since:
2006-11-27

Software patents do exist. You can value their danger at zero by focussing purely on technology, but for software developers and distributors, the danger is not zero.

For many, h.264 is simply not permitted. Everyone is permitted to implement and distribute Ogg Theora.

On a technical level, Ogg Theora is quite good, and it is without a shadow of a doubt good *enough* for Wikipedia.

Careful with the "religious war" claims. File format is just one of many aspects of video quality, and the difference between h.264 and Theora is less than 10% of this one aspect. When people ignore everything else and take stances based on this small part of a very small part, that's where I see religous wars.

h.264's patents will indeed expire eventually, in 2018, but by then today's h.264 will no longer be the most technologically advanced format, so by your logic you'll have stopped advocating it.

Edited 2010-03-18 06:36 UTC

Reply Score: 5

RE: Yeah, go!
by Fergy on Thu 18th Mar 2010 08:10 UTC in reply to "Yeah, go!"
Fergy Member since:
2006-04-10

If Theora ultimately fails it will be because of its inferiority.


If the superior tech always prevailed most of us would be using BeOS (or perhaps even GEOS) today...

So what is it? Marketing mostly prevails over technical superiority. And money mostly prevails over what is best for the people.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Yeah, go!
by _QJ_ on Thu 18th Mar 2010 09:37 UTC in reply to "Yeah, go!"
_QJ_ Member since:
2009-03-12

Just to say that it is not the best technology which will win.

The easiest and the cheaper will win, which is not -forcing- the best in a technology point of view.

The history of technologies is plenty of cases.

A vast majority of people will choose the cheaper solution if it is available, the easiest available, and if it run as it in their computer/browser, they will not choose at all.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Yeah, go!
by r_a_trip on Thu 18th Mar 2010 16:06 UTC in reply to "Yeah, go!"
r_a_trip Member since:
2005-07-06

I don't like h.264 licensing, but you can't force stuff on people like that.

So why do you promote the very thing you are claiming to be against? You are trying to force H.264 on freedom loving people by writing off Theora from the get go.

Pushing very hard on the technical aspects of the format which will hurt free(dom) culture the most and do some handwaiving over patents is disingenious at best and just pure evil at worst.

Reply Score: 4

Well personally
by error32 on Thu 18th Mar 2010 19:24 UTC
error32
Member since:
2008-12-10

I have never seen the need for video on a web page, this is one of the reasons I don't have flash plugins. And I believe that things like youtube have helped to greatly deteriorate the quality of the internet by lowering the bar for publishing material that demands thought before uploading, hence I can't really see any point in video on wikipedia.
However if there should be video on the web, then let it at least be an open format so people with alternative operating systems and browsers can enjoy it too if they wish so.

Reply Score: 1