Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 3rd Jan 2011 20:27 UTC
Intel It's the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, so it's time for new stuff to spend your hard-earned cash on. This time around, Intel is making headlines by officially launching its Sandy Bridge line of processors, which, up until now, were totally next-generation.
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Comment by vivainio
by vivainio on Mon 3rd Jan 2011 20:34 UTC
vivainio
Member since:
2008-12-26

The all new 2010 Intel Core processor family is the first to integrate graphics into mainstream PC processor


I guess he means desktop? I thought laptops are the mainstream these days, and desktops are for enthusiasts...

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by vivainio
by lucas_maximus on Mon 3rd Jan 2011 20:39 UTC in reply to "Comment by vivainio"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

The all new 2010 Intel Core processor family is the first to integrate graphics into mainstream PC processor


They mean x86/x86-64 processors.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by vivainio
by vivainio on Mon 3rd Jan 2011 21:00 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by vivainio"
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26


They mean x86/x86-64 processors.

Ah, so he means integrating on the same die. pinetrail already had gpu in the same cpu package iiuc.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by vivainio
by Cletus on Tue 4th Jan 2011 08:48 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by vivainio"
Cletus Member since:
2011-01-04

They really do mean x86. ARM, at least, has had CPUs with integrated GPUs for a while now.

Edit: actually atom has had integrated GPU for a while now too. So yes, by mainstream they mean desktop I guess.

Edited 2011-01-04 08:51 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE: Comment by vivainio
by aftermath on Mon 3rd Jan 2011 21:15 UTC in reply to "Comment by vivainio"
aftermath Member since:
2010-10-29

Intel's GMA HD, which replaced the GMA 4500M HD, was integrated in the CPU. The Intel HD Graphics 3000 goes a step further and is now directly on the die. This is the "tock" phase of Intel's "tick-tock" release schedule. In other words, it's an entirely new microarchitecture targeted at PCs. Speaking of which, I'm always stunned to find that people rely on Wikipedia as a primary source for information. I'm even more stunned when a Wikipedia article has more accurate information than an average person on a pretty common topic. For example: "A personal computer (PC) is any general-purpose computer whose size, capabilities, and original sales price make it useful for individuals, and which is intended to be operated directly by an end-user with no intervening computer operator." Desktops and laptops are just PCs, and yes, Apple sells a lot of PCs despite it's "Mac vs. PC" ads.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by vivainio
by tyrione on Mon 3rd Jan 2011 22:59 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by vivainio"
tyrione Member since:
2005-11-21

Intel's GMA HD, which replaced the GMA 4500M HD, was integrated in the CPU. The Intel HD Graphics 3000 goes a step further and is now directly on the die. This is the "tock" phase of Intel's "tick-tock" release schedule. In other words, it's an entirely new microarchitecture targeted at PCs. Speaking of which, I'm always stunned to find that people rely on Wikipedia as a primary source for information. I'm even more stunned when a Wikipedia article has more accurate information than an average person on a pretty common topic. For example: "A personal computer (PC) is any general-purpose computer whose size, capabilities, and original sales price make it useful for individuals, and which is intended to be operated directly by an end-user with no intervening computer operator." Desktops and laptops are just PCs, and yes, Apple sells a lot of PCs despite it's "Mac vs. PC" ads.


It's a catch up to AMD play.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by vivainio
by ciplogic on Mon 3rd Jan 2011 23:13 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by vivainio"
ciplogic Member since:
2006-12-22

I think that even AMD will have something to suffer from it. AMD Bulldozer will have strong integer performance for threaded apps (almost unseen for now, excluding databases and virtualizations in my experience). Anyway, about integrated video card, is fairly enough good to not think on: "integrated intel graphics", even is not the "Crysis" CPU/GPU, is for certain the Win7 CPU. If you play any game that IE9/FF4/Flash will give, go video decoding, and so on, I think Intel still will be a winner. The last scarry thing, is that AMD with their quad double core module (aka 8 cores) will likely have lower frequencies per core, so they will be as Phenom was some years ago: a lot of cores, but bad performance in small threaded workloads. So for me Intel did at least halfly his job by byting lower end graphics, right now AMD hopefully will find the next marketing term of their CPUs to prevail.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by vivainio
by looncraz on Tue 4th Jan 2011 07:00 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by vivainio"
looncraz Member since:
2005-07-24

AMD has indicated that operating frequencies will be equal to & greater than currently available.

Top shelf should be nearing the 4GHz mark on Turbo at release. Speeds should step from there.

The x6 line of phenom II shows that AMD knows how to make it happen. The longer pipelines on the Bulldozer indicate a design more suited for higher clocks. I just hope we don't see a repeat of Intel's Pentium 4 mistake.. except made by AMD this time...

Doubtful, performance is claimed to be at least 12% faster per clock ( to match i7 clock-per-clock ). No figures for the clock capabilities, which is something that can really only be surmised until qualification production begins.

I think AMD's Bulldozer architecture is a brilliant move, but I fear the FPU performance may be below intel by too great a margin...

Oh well.. I'm rambling... or not.. I can't tell... me so tired...

--The loon

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by vivainio
by kaiwai on Tue 4th Jan 2011 07:17 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by vivainio"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

But it all depends really on how optimised middleware, compilers and operating systems are for these new extensions. If Intel has the hardware edge but AMD does a better job working with existing technology which requires no additional optimisations then it'll be an interesting to see AMD pull ahead in terms of market share.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Comment by vivainio
by Cletus on Wed 5th Jan 2011 13:30 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by vivainio"
Cletus Member since:
2011-01-04

How so? Sandy Bridge will work well on existing codes without recompiling or rewriting.

Reply Score: 1

RE[7]: Comment by vivainio
by kaiwai on Thu 6th Jan 2011 07:23 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by vivainio"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

How so? Sandy Bridge will work well on existing codes without recompiling or rewriting.


They're introducing new extensions and applications will have to be optimised to use them. Why is that so difficult to understand?

Reply Score: 2

drm
by vivainio on Mon 3rd Jan 2011 23:19 UTC
vivainio
Member since:
2008-12-26

it appears this baby is packing drm in hardware, the only place where it matters.

Reply Score: 2

RE: drm
by MechR on Tue 4th Jan 2011 07:12 UTC in reply to "drm"
MechR Member since:
2006-01-11
any performance numbers yet?
by re_re on Tue 4th Jan 2011 01:17 UTC
re_re
Member since:
2005-07-06

Are there any performance numbers available yet? Also, does anybody know what socket this is? I have an I5 650 and was wondering if the I5/I7 variants will be direct drop ins for people currently using them.

the integrated graphics mean nothing to me, but if I can get a solid performance boost from my processor I may look into getting one if it works with my motherboard.

Reply Score: 2

HTPC
by FunkyELF on Tue 4th Jan 2011 02:06 UTC
FunkyELF
Member since:
2006-07-26

This looks enticing for an HTPC.
Whenever my Original Xbox decided to give up and die I will have to build one and this might be the processor for it.

Reply Score: 2

Stock reaction
by Bobthearch on Tue 4th Jan 2011 02:12 UTC
Bobthearch
Member since:
2006-01-27

So Intel makes this huge announcement and the stock dips, even on a big Up day in the markets. Didn't make any sense, until...

Until I saw the date on the linked press release. INTERNATIONAL CONSUMER ELECTRONICS SHOW, Las Vegas, Jan. 7, 2010
This story is a year old. ;)

Reply Score: 4

RE: Stock reaction
by earksiinni on Tue 4th Jan 2011 05:26 UTC in reply to "Stock reaction"
earksiinni Member since:
2009-03-27

This isn't the first time that's happened on this site...

Reply Score: 1

RE: Stock reaction
by Stratoukos on Tue 4th Jan 2011 11:33 UTC in reply to "Stock reaction"
Stratoukos Member since:
2009-02-11

This is on the frontpage of Ars and Sandy Bridge is indeed Intel's latest architecture, so the story is new. Thom must have linked to the wrong announcement.

Reply Score: 2

pica
Member since:
2005-07-10

Most -- if not all -- benchmarks posted on the web state the Core i5 is significally faster than the Phenom II. This does not reflect my own experience. Or to be more precise, it is only a part of my experience.

I am architect of a .NET project with about 90MBytes of Code. Mainly C# code, but low level "drivers" have been coded using C++. The build script is a nant script, that is purely sequentiell. Building that project from scratch takes ~340s on a 2.66GHz Core i5 core, but "only" 230s on a 3.0GHz Phenom II core. Per GHz the Phenom II is ~25% faster. An 1.6GHz Atom N270 takes ~1025s to do the trick. But that core is another league.

Also in my experience buildung Java projects is significally faster on the Phenom II. The same is true for commercial workloads.

All these workloads share a high number of unpredictable jumps and a large active code size.

In performing 3D graphics, image manipution and multimedia de-/encoding the Core i5 is faster. Significally. But these workloads are completely different. Mainly tight loops with a priori known number of iterations and a small active code size. In each iteration the same set of operations are performed.

There are of benchmarks available for the SandyBridge. But only 3D graphics, image manipution and multimedia de-/encoding. The bright side of the Core i5 core.

Any numbers for commercial workloads ???

pica

Edited 2011-01-04 12:43 UTC

Reply Score: 3