Linked by lemur2 on Tue 11th Oct 2011 14:30 UTC
KDE KDE has announced the release of Plasma Active One, which is a KDE 4.x style interface and API designed for touch devices. The Plasma Active Team states that "Plasma Active is innovative technology for an intelligent user experience. It is intended for all types of tablets, smartphones and touch computing devices such as set-top boxes, smart TVs, home automation, in-vehicle infotainment".
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Wish them the best of luck
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Tue 11th Oct 2011 15:09 UTC
Bill Shooter of Bul
Member since:
2006-07-14

It looks great! I hope they find some manufacturers willing to use it as a supported interface. The problem with a third party tablet OS/interface is the availability of drivers and/or general lock down of the system which would prevent KDE Active from working on many of them.

Reply Score: 4

v KDE going GNOME
by Jason Bourne on Tue 11th Oct 2011 15:57 UTC
RE: KDE going GNOME
by lemur2 on Tue 11th Oct 2011 23:24 UTC in reply to "KDE going GNOME"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Hilarious. KDE going GNOME...


A nice overview and (contrasting) opinion piece can be found here:

http://www.datamation.com/open-source/kdes-plasma-active-tops-gnome...

KDE's 'Plasma Active' Tops GNOME 3 and Unity

"Mobile devices have been influencing desktop software design for several years now. Mostly, I've not been impressed. Either the results are awkward, like GNOME 3, or over-simplified, like Ubuntu's Unity.

I had just about reached the conclusion that the mobile influence represented a step backwards in desktop design -- then I tried KDE's Plasma Active, a desktop designed for touch screen tablets, and all my assumptions were trampled underfoot.

Quite simply, Plasma Active is not only an elegant solution for small screens, but also for screens of any size. By any standards, it's an example of effective desktop design.

Unlike other recent desktops, Plasma Active is neither a conceptual re-design nor a new beginning. Rather, it is a sub-set of KDE -- a shell underlying the technology and concepts found in other incarnations of KDE."


Conclusion:
"Why does Plasma Active work so well compared to other desktops designed for mobile devices or influenced by them? A comparison suggests several answers.

First, Plasma Active emphasizes Activities, but does not compel users to set up more than one. If you choose, you can even ignore the Activities Switcher altogether, and work within a single Activity.

Should a time ever comes when you want to experiment with a more sophisticated desktop, the controls are all unobtrusively tucked away at the edges of the screen. This is a flexibility that other recent desktops simply don't offer. In the last two GNOME releases, you have no choice except to use multiple workspaces, while Unity offers only its extreme simplification. In other words, Plasma Active accomodates different levels of users in a way that its counterparts do not.

Second, Plasma Active is focused on a single view. The contents of that view changes when you change Activities, but the orientation remains unchanged. Other features like the Activity Switcher and the Recommendations tab slide out to occupy the desktop -- but only part of it, and they are easily retractable. The advantage of this design is not just that users are unlikely to become disoriented, as they are with an overview or a menu that covers the entire screen, but that Plasma Active feels uncluttered and simple.

The single view also gives Plasma Active its third advantage: unity of design. It is intended for touchscreens, but the same design that works for a sweep of a finger works almost as well for a stroke of a mouse.

Either gesture is suitable for dragging out windows from the tabs and the panel, and, once you know to look for things to pull out, you need to know very little else to discover all of the desktop's functionality. Despite the fact that Plasma Active is actually a radical departure from the standard desktop, it doesn't feel like one, because it's unified design makes it simply to use.

Plasma Active comes late to the tablet desktop, but its ingenuity might just make it a player. While other desktops have been evoking alleged design principles to justify their efforts, without any fuss KDE has quietly shown more awareness of user's needs than any of them. If nothing else, its developers manage to avoid mistaking simple for over-simplifying.

I can't remember the last time a desktop seemed both so original and so promising."

Reply Score: 5

RE: KDE going GNOME
by Nth_Man on Wed 12th Oct 2011 00:53 UTC in reply to "KDE going GNOME"
Nth_Man Member since:
2010-05-16

People can't use the conventional KDE user interfaces in those devices with small screens and touchscreens, but not everything must be rebuilt :-)

Edited 2011-10-12 00:57 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: KDE going GNOME
by lemur2 on Wed 12th Oct 2011 01:07 UTC in reply to "RE: KDE going GNOME"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

People can't use the conventional KDE user interfaces in those devices with small screens and touchscreens, but not everything must be rebuilt :-)


Indeed.

Here is a review with screen-shots showing some conventional KDE applications running under Plasma Active on Meego.

http://m.zdnet.com.au/plasma-active-339323981.htm

The Plasma Active web browser, Kontact Active and Calligra Office Active have new UIs specifically for Plasma Active, but from the above screenshots it is clear that kwrite and konsole do not.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: KDE going GNOME
by phoenix on Thu 13th Oct 2011 01:33 UTC in reply to "RE: KDE going GNOME"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

People can't use the conventional KDE user interfaces in those devices with small screens and touchscreens, but not everything must be rebuilt :-)


Hrm, interesting. It's like plasma-netbook done even better. Will have to check it out.

Reply Score: 3

Would love to have one.
by porcel on Tue 11th Oct 2011 16:27 UTC
porcel
Member since:
2006-01-28

I would be extremely happy to pay for a top-notch tablet that runs Plasma Active well and I would hope that it would also integrate well with my existing kde desktop.

To me KDE is the promise of Linux on the desktop fulfilled. I have not seen anything which is more intuitive or nicer to use. Perhaps, my only gripe is that the nepomuk integration and the search experience isn´t quite up-to-par yet, but it will ge there.

Reply Score: 6

Pretty cool.
by UltraZelda64 on Tue 11th Oct 2011 16:47 UTC
UltraZelda64
Member since:
2006-12-05

I'm glad to see something like this in the form of an optional interface "edition" instead of the developers shitting all over everything that makes KDE what it is and trying to change the core desktop. GNOME is destroying themselves by designing for specialized portable devices, and claiming that it's in the best of all users' interests, and for all types of devices; sorry, but I don't buy it. I was originally unhappy with the KDE4 series, but it seems to be the only major desktop environment (aside from Xfce) that still has its sanity. If only it didn't have such high system requirements... but then again, GNOME 3 even outdone them on that by requiring a working 3D card and drivers.

Reply Score: 6

RE: Pretty cool.
by cdude on Wed 12th Oct 2011 14:51 UTC in reply to "Pretty cool."
cdude Member since:
2008-09-21

I couldn't agree more. I think for the KDE desktop edition performance is good enough to take with more or less current hardware but for the KDE active edition they will definitive need to tweak for performance and battery-lifetime. That is good news cause I would expect that KDE desktop will profit from such tweaks too.

Just awesome.

Reply Score: 1

RE:
by zima on Tue 18th Oct 2011 23:43 UTC in reply to "Pretty cool."
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

seems to be the only major desktop environment (aside from Xfce) that still has its sanity

LXDE is at the very least becoming major (check out position of Lubuntu vs. Kubuntu or Xubuntu on Distrowatch), and it's rather sane.

Edited 2011-10-18 23:44 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Touchscreen support
by jabbotts on Tue 11th Oct 2011 16:59 UTC
jabbotts
Member since:
2007-09-06

Anyone have a list of Touchscreen monitors and tablets that work well with Xorg (pref Debian6 but if Deb7 is becoming stable enough...)

Every time I have a go at dropping a distro on a device, it always dies with the lack of drivers for the touchscreens I have access to. I'd be interested in hearing what touchscreens work well.

(can't play with the new KDE touchy interface without a touchy)

Reply Score: 2

RE: Touchscreen support
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Tue 11th Oct 2011 18:32 UTC in reply to "Touchscreen support"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

WeTab is pretty much the only option if you want to test the touchscreen part of it according to the devs. They're recommending a x86 tablet that is known to support meego.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Touchscreen support
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Tue 11th Oct 2011 19:36 UTC in reply to "RE: Touchscreen support"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Or the viewsonic viewpad ( its x86 based) I'm now told which makes a lot of sense and isn't too difficult to find.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Touchscreen support
by Moochman on Thu 13th Oct 2011 01:37 UTC in reply to "RE: Touchscreen support"
Moochman Member since:
2005-07-06

Or ExoPC, since it's the exact same hardware. ;)

Unfortunately both of these systems only support 2 simultaneous touch points, which limits the range of applications that can be developed for them. On the plus side, they're cheap, especially the WeTab. ;)

Edited 2011-10-13 01:37 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE: Touchscreen support
by lemur2 on Tue 11th Oct 2011 22:06 UTC in reply to "Touchscreen support"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Anyone have a list of Touchscreen monitors and tablets that work well with Xorg (pref Debian6 but if Deb7 is becoming stable enough...) Every time I have a go at dropping a distro on a device, it always dies with the lack of drivers for the touchscreens I have access to. I'd be interested in hearing what touchscreens work well. (can't play with the new KDE touchy interface without a touchy)


KDE depends on a hardware abstraction layer called Solid.

http://techbase.kde.org/Development/Architecture/KDE4/Solid

Plasma Active One should therefore work on all devices which are supported by Solid. It is a matter of getting the drivers working with Solid, it is not a matter of re-writing Plasma Active One to work on different devices.

http://www.zdnet.com/blog/open-source/kde-takes-on-android-apples-i...

"The first release of Plasma Active fully focuses on tablet computers. Plasma Active Tablet’s user experience is designed around the web, social networks and multimedia content.” Today, Plasma Active runs on MeeGo and the openSUSE-based Balsam Professional (German language site). There are also OS images for Intel-based tablets, and package builds for ARM and x86 platforms. The group is working flashable images for ARM platforms. The interface will also run on Oracle’s VirtualBox virtual machine."

Edited 2011-10-11 22:14 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: Touchscreen support
by lemur2 on Wed 12th Oct 2011 03:53 UTC in reply to "Touchscreen support"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Anyone have a list of Touchscreen monitors and tablets that work well with Xorg (pref Debian6 but if Deb7 is becoming stable enough...) Every time I have a go at dropping a distro on a device, it always dies with the lack of drivers for the touchscreens I have access to. I'd be interested in hearing what touchscreens work well. (can't play with the new KDE touchy interface without a touchy)


Now that Meego is suspect, the Acer Iconia M500 looks like one good candidate to run Plasma Active instead.

http://www.engadget.com/2011/06/01/acer-unveils-meego-tablet-runnin...

If not this, then perhaps the WeTab.

Edited 2011-10-12 03:57 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Touchscreen support
by jabbotts on Wed 12th Oct 2011 18:19 UTC in reply to "RE: Touchscreen support"
jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

I'll have to look into those. I've been looking at touchscreen monitors but these days, a tablet is just as good for what I want to do; ultimately, my own minimal install to support a thinclient kind of thing around the house. (No need for a full rig setup just to provide a remote display of a web-app and keyboard/mouse setups don't really cut it around the kitchen and such.)

Reply Score: 2

Offtopic a bit, but....
by senshikaze on Tue 11th Oct 2011 17:33 UTC
senshikaze
Member since:
2011-03-08

...What does organic mean in this context? I see that alot, but can never figure what is supposed to be "organic."

The user interface is designed using Plasma Quick, a declarative markup language allowing for organic user interface design based on Qt Quick.


Edited 2011-10-11 17:35 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE: Offtopic a bit, but....
by Soulbender on Tue 11th Oct 2011 17:42 UTC in reply to "Offtopic a bit, but...."
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Nothing. It means nothing.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Offtopic a bit, but....
by Nth_Man on Wed 12th Oct 2011 00:48 UTC in reply to "Offtopic a bit, but...."
Nth_Man Member since:
2010-05-16

...What does organic mean in this context?

As I understand, "organic" as "constitutional in the structure of something". Parts, with an structure, related to others, with norms, that form a defined "organism" as a whole. [http://ardictionary.com/Organic/2198].

Reply Score: 3

RE: Offtopic a bit, but....
by jessesmith on Wed 12th Oct 2011 12:31 UTC in reply to "Offtopic a bit, but...."
jessesmith Member since:
2010-03-11

It means it can be adjusted to suit the environment, possibly through trial and error.

Reply Score: 1

ARM support
by saynte on Tue 11th Oct 2011 17:36 UTC
saynte
Member since:
2007-12-10

ARM support is still in development? Given the landscape of smartphones and tablets, I wonder why that wasn't the first target.

Reply Score: 1

RE: ARM support
by vivainio on Tue 11th Oct 2011 18:26 UTC in reply to "ARM support"
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26

Because every arm chipset is different, you would basically need to take a specific board as a starting point.

For an OS's project it makes sense to productize intel first and then think of arm. Once pa goes wayland, arm support will be much easier to do because of lessrequirements imposed on drivers.

If you are interested in following up on how pa reaches different hw platforms, start tracking the Mer project.

Tl;Dr; arm sucks

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: ARM support
by saynte on Tue 11th Oct 2011 18:50 UTC in reply to "RE: ARM support"
saynte Member since:
2007-12-10

ARM sucks? Or is it just that SoCs suck due to their specialized nature?

Also, couldn't they have taken some of the Android kernel/driver code? I guess the higher layers may have to be rebuilt, but the drivers should be in a usable state (because they are used ;) ).

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: ARM support
by vivainio on Tue 11th Oct 2011 18:55 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: ARM support"
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26

Android drivers will be easier to use after switch to wayland. Accelerated x11 support is hard to do if you only have Android drivers.

Reply Score: 2

RE: ARM support
by Morty on Tue 11th Oct 2011 20:10 UTC in reply to "ARM support"
Morty Member since:
2005-07-06

ARM support is still in development? Given the landscape of smartphones and tablets, I wonder why that wasn't the first target.

You already answered the question, given the landscape of smartphones and tablets.

The issue is that apart from Nokias Maemo and Megoo phones, there are no Meego or other Linux(w/userspace) available devices. It's only Android, lacing the Linux userspace.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: ARM support
by saynte on Tue 11th Oct 2011 21:39 UTC in reply to "RE: ARM support"
saynte Member since:
2007-12-10

Yeah, I can appreciate the technical problems in getting it onto today's hardware.

I really hope that ARM is a the next big development step, I think Linux likely got where it is now because it ran/runs on the common hardware. Virtually no-one I know has any x86 based phone or tablet devices, but that's not to say that it not useful to target those devices.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: ARM support
by Neolander on Wed 12th Oct 2011 05:47 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: ARM support"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Well, to work as well as on x86, Linux on ARM would need two things : standard and well-documented hardware, and easy device reflashing.

Several major phone manufacturers are opening up their bootloaders, so we're getting there on the reflashing front. But as for standard and well-documented hardware... NVidia, TI, and Qualcomm each do their own thing in their little corner, and if it has not changed since the last time I checked, the only resource which they publicly provide to OS developers are binary Android drivers.

Probably someone will end up reverse engineering those or shoehorning them on Linux at some point, and we'll get something not very reliable and efficient like Nouveau, but for every piece of ARM hardware out there. The future of Linux on ARM, or every other alternative OS for that matter, does not look bright.

Edited 2011-10-12 05:50 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: ARM support
by saynte on Wed 12th Oct 2011 06:51 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: ARM support"
saynte Member since:
2007-12-10

My only real point is a pragmatic one: grab the most common phone hardware, and use the Android/Linux stack as far as you can. You don't need source for the drivers if the binaries are present. It might not be the cleanest solution, but if they work...

Reply Score: 1

RE[5]: ARM support
by Neolander on Wed 12th Oct 2011 16:46 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: ARM support"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

I believe Android drivers cannot be used directly on a kernel, without some kind of emulation. The two kernels are already sufficiently far away from each other to make drivers incompatible.

Seems like I had forgotten that TI do provide Linux drivers though. That's already something.

Edited 2011-10-12 16:48 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE[6]: ARM support
by lemur2 on Wed 12th Oct 2011 23:56 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: ARM support"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I believe Android drivers cannot be used directly on a kernel, without some kind of emulation. The two kernels are already sufficiently far away from each other to make drivers incompatible. Seems like I had forgotten that TI do provide Linux drivers though. That's already something.


I was looking for an actual tablet based on the TI OMAP platform, and I came up with this:

http://www.slashgear.com/texas-instruments-blaze-tablet-available-t...

Unfortunately, TI's Blaze tablet is not for the budget concious:

http://www.tabletpcreview.com/default.asp?newsID=1478

... but it would be very cool to run Plasma Active on such a device (if you had one), would it not?

Perhaps the TI Blaze is a foretaste of what may be possible (at a more reasonable price) quite soon.

Edited 2011-10-12 23:58 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: ARM support - TI OMAP tablets
by lemur2 on Thu 13th Oct 2011 01:17 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: ARM support"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I was looking for an actual tablet based on the TI OMAP platform


With better search terms I found a few at least with a little more reasonable affordability:

The Lenovo IdeaPad A1 Now Selling for $199
http://www.tomsguide.com/us/IdeaPad-Gingerbread-OMAP-Kindle-Fire-Pr...

The Droid Bionic, LG Thrill/Optimus 3D, and Droid 3
http://www.androidauthority.com/android-ice-cream-sandwich-coming-l...

Archos Sub-$400 "G9" Tablets
http://hothardware.com/News/Archos-To-Ship-Sub400-G9-Tablets-With-A...

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: ARM support
by Morty on Wed 12th Oct 2011 07:20 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: ARM support"
Morty Member since:
2005-07-06

NVidia, TI, and Qualcomm each do their own thing in their little corner, and if it has not changed since the last time I checked, the only resource which they publicly provide to OS developers are binary Android drivers.

True, re-flashing and some of the hardware drivers are the issues.

The hardest issue is the lack of accelerated graphics drivers, as its the key element and no easy task to develop. As for the rest of the peripherals in the SoCs, it's far less complex is somewhat better documented and there are lots of code for similar hardware that can be adapted.

The second mayor issue is the re-flashing, the complexity and the risk of bricking are a serious roadblock for most.

As for the SoC vendors, currently the best bet is to find something with a touch screen and a TI SoC(Anyone know of such a tablet?). On such a device, the issues would mainly be about the re-flashing. Since most of the drivers already have quite mature solutions, thanks to the Beagle and Panda boards.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: ARM support
by lemur2 on Wed 12th Oct 2011 13:00 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: ARM support"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Well, to work as well as on x86, Linux on ARM would need two things : standard and well-documented hardware, and easy device reflashing.

Several major phone manufacturers are opening up their bootloaders, so we're getting there on the reflashing front. But as for standard and well-documented hardware... NVidia, TI, and Qualcomm each do their own thing in their little corner, and if it has not changed since the last time I checked, the only resource which they publicly provide to OS developers are binary Android drivers.

Probably someone will end up reverse engineering those or shoehorning them on Linux at some point, and we'll get something not very reliable and efficient like Nouveau, but for every piece of ARM hardware out there. The future of Linux on ARM, or every other alternative OS for that matter, does not look bright.


http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=OTgzNg

Samsung Puts Out New Open-Source ARM DRM Driver

"Samsung has published the code to a new open-source DRM driver for its EXYNOS4210 System-On-a-Chip. The EXYNOS4210 has impressive 3D graphics capabilities, uses the dual-core ARM Cortex A9 processor, and is used in various smart-phones. The Samsung Galaxy S II is one of the smart-phones using the Exynos 4210 SoC. Samsung is hoping to push this DRM driver into the mainline Linux kernel."

Outside of ARM

http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=OTg3MA

Texas Instruments Has New Open-Source Driver

"While Texas Instruments released an open-source driver last year for the Linux kernel within the DRM area (the TILER driver), it didn't make it into the mainline tree for the lack of open-source user-space applications/drivers that could take advantage of it, i.e. the usual ARM graphics mess. Yesterday, however, Texas Instruments released a new open-source DRM driver for their OMAP platforms."

Edited 2011-10-12 13:09 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: ARM support
by lemur2 on Wed 12th Oct 2011 21:56 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: ARM support"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Outside of ARM http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=OTg3MA Texas Instruments Has New Open-Source Driver "While Texas Instruments released an open-source driver last year for the Linux kernel within the DRM area (the TILER driver), it didn't make it into the mainline tree for the lack of open-source user-space applications/drivers that could take advantage of it, i.e. the usual ARM graphics mess. Yesterday, however, Texas Instruments released a new open-source DRM driver for their OMAP platforms."


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texas_Instruments_OMAP

I'm sorry about that, I got it wrong.

"Texas Instruments OMAP (Open Multimedia Application Platform) is a category of proprietary system on chips (SoCs) for portable and mobile multimedia applications developed by Texas Instruments. OMAP devices generally include a general-purpose ARM architecture processor core plus one or more specialized co-processors."

OMAP platform SoCs apparently have ARM cores.

OMAP 4 - The 4th generation OMAPs, OMAP4430, 4460 and 4470 all use dual-core ARM Cortex-A9s. All OMAP 4 comes with an IVA3 multimedia hardware accelerator with a programmable DSP that enables 1080p Full HD and multi-standard video encode/decode.

OMAP 5 - The 5th generation OMAP, OMAP 5 SoC uses a dual-core ARM Cortex-A15 CPU with two additional ARM Cortex-M4 cores to offload the A15s in less computionally intensive tasks to increase power efficiency, two PowerVR SGX544MP graphics cores and a dedicated TI 2D BitBlt graphics accelerator, a multi-pipe display sub-system and a signal processor. They respectively support 24 and 20-megapixel cameras for front and rear 3D HD video recording. The chip also supports up to 8GB of dual channel DDR3 memory, output to four HD 3D displays and 3D HDMI 1.4 video output. OMAP 5 also includes 3 USB 2.0 ports and a SATA 2.0 controller.

Wow.

Edited 2011-10-12 21:57 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Comment by Luminair
by Luminair on Tue 11th Oct 2011 22:00 UTC
Luminair
Member since:
2007-03-30

"Plasma Active runs on the proven Linux desktop stack, including the Linux kernel, Qt and KDE's Plasma Framework."

Ugh. Somehow that doesn't sell me on their x86 tablet idea.

Edited 2011-10-11 22:01 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by Luminair
by lemur2 on Tue 11th Oct 2011 22:24 UTC in reply to "Comment by Luminair"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"Plasma Active runs on the proven Linux desktop stack, including the Linux kernel, Qt and KDE's Plasma Framework." Ugh. Somehow that doesn't sell me on their x86 tablet idea.


Given the breakthrough concept of Activities:

http://aseigo.blogspot.com/2011/10/activities.html

coupled with the fact that a number of apps are already working with Plasma Active One, including Kontact Touch, Calligra Active, Bangarang and a collection of Active Apps, I think that Plasma Active is a far better idea for tablets than adapting a phone OS (e.g. iOS, Android) or a desktop OS (Metro).

http://aseigo.blogspot.com/2011/04/plasma-active-calligra-active.ht...

So it has a capable touch-enabled Office Suite included out-of-the-box.

PS: I believe that Kontact Touch works with Exchange on the server.

http://vizzzion.org/blog/2011/10/plasma-active-perspectives-the-app...

"In the area of groupware and email, Plasma Active really shines thanks to Kontact Touch, a mature groupware suite designed specifically for touchscreen interfaces. Kontact Touch has all the features already known from its desktop counterpart, among which a vast variety of connectors to groupware servers, among which Exchange and Kolab. For on-the-go use-cases, Kontact Touch’s offline features are a big win, making it easy to catch up on what happened during offline periods. Kontact Touch’s email client performs really well on the underpowered tablet, even for insanely large mailboxes with tens of thousands of emails."

Edited 2011-10-11 22:39 UTC

Reply Score: 5

RE: Comment by Luminair
by cdude on Wed 12th Oct 2011 15:05 UTC in reply to "Comment by Luminair"
cdude Member since:
2008-09-21

The proven Linux desktop stack refers to X11. Unproven seems to mean Wayland or whatever else is out there (Android? Framebuffer? console ascii art?).

Taken into account that Meego is build on that proven Linux desktop stack and so is Balsam it somehow makes sense to focus on that first.

Seems the plan is to get support for Wayland done in 2012. See http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=wayland_kde_2012...

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by Luminair
by shmerl on Wed 12th Oct 2011 17:09 UTC in reply to "Comment by Luminair"
shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

It can run on ARM as well.

Reply Score: 2

Thank you Nokia!
by fatjoe on Tue 11th Oct 2011 22:00 UTC
fatjoe
Member since:
2010-01-12

You read a lot of "Nokia is dead, MeeGo is dead" crap on the internet these days.

While Nokia is not fully committed to meego anymore, it is nice to see how their work on MeeGo and Qt/QtQuick have benefited the FOSS community with projects like this.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Thank you Nokia!
by shmerl on Wed 12th Oct 2011 06:53 UTC in reply to "Thank you Nokia!"
shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

Mer and derivatives are to rescue.

Reply Score: 3

Comment by shmerl
by shmerl on Wed 12th Oct 2011 07:01 UTC
shmerl
Member since:
2010-06-08

Plasma Active team had a meeting with the Mer project team ( http://mer-project.org ) , for planning how to produce an open mobile distro combining the best efforts of Mer core, and Plasma Active UI.

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/3938857/mer_pa_meeting.html

Reply Score: 3