Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 22nd Aug 2014 12:36 UTC
Windows

Microsoft is planning to unveil its Windows 8 successor next month at a special press event. Sources familiar with Microsoft’s plans tell The Verge that the software maker is tentatively planning its press event for September 30th to detail upcoming changes to Windows as part of a release codenamed "Threshold." This date may change, but the Threshold version of Windows is currently in development and Microsoft plans to release a preview version of what will likely be named Windows 9 to developers on September 30th or shortly afterwards. The date follows recent reports from ZDNet that suggested Microsoft is planning to release a preview version of Windows 9 in late September or early October.

Microsoft is really stepping up its release schedule. Good.

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subscription?
by bolomkxxviii on Fri 22nd Aug 2014 14:12 UTC
bolomkxxviii
Member since:
2006-05-19

Is this where Microsoft finally tries to get everyone to pay a subscription for the OS? I have heard rumors but cannot get confirmation.

Reply Score: 2

RE: subscription?
by moondevil on Fri 22nd Aug 2014 16:32 UTC in reply to "subscription?"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Any shop doing serious Windows development has been doing subscriptions since the mid 90's.

Same applies to commercial UNIX systems as well.

Edited 2014-08-22 16:33 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: subscription?
by Pro-Competition on Fri 22nd Aug 2014 19:25 UTC in reply to "RE: subscription?"
Pro-Competition Member since:
2007-08-20

That's true, but most individual users and small businesses haven't.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: subscription?
by glarepate on Fri 22nd Aug 2014 22:25 UTC in reply to "RE: subscription?"
glarepate Member since:
2006-01-04

Any shop doing serious Windows development has been doing subscriptions since the mid 90's.

Same applies to commercial UNIX systems as well.


I can see why a dev. shop would want to write this off as a business expense.

But I haven't heard of subscribing to UNIX systems before. I tried searching for it and didn't find anything either.

Were you saying that UNIX shops also pay for subscriptions to Windows? I can see how that could be useful as well as helping defray costs if that was your meaning.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: subscription?
by shotsman on Sat 23rd Aug 2014 05:37 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: subscription?"
shotsman Member since:
2005-07-22

You keep a subscription (i.e. support contract) going with the likes of RedHat ans SUSE. This keeps the update coming but letting it expire does not suddently stop the systems running the Software from running.

What I an a lot of others are afraid of is something like this:-
Keep paying the Microsoft tithe OR .... your system suddenly blue screens and won't boot.

They have you by the short and curlies...

If they do and the mothly cost is high then I'd expect a boost in the numbers of users that:-
1) Say 'sod off' MS and keep their current OS regardless of the security implications
2) Move to another OS such as OSX or Linux (please not Ubuntu but that is another story)
3) Stop using their PC altogether and stick with a tablet/smartphone.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: subscription?
by unclefester on Sat 23rd Aug 2014 07:21 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: subscription?"
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

Many people already pay for a worthless antivirus subscription. As long as the fee wasn't too high (<$100/yr) most people would just pay up to keep their Windows.

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: subscription?
by glarepate on Sat 23rd Aug 2014 17:17 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: subscription?"
glarepate Member since:
2006-01-04

True that a UNIX system wouldn't stop running if your [support] contract ran out. But you could get cut off from at least some of the premium updates, ala Solaris.

Would a subscription to Windows include support? I think that although that apple may have an orange-ish cast to it it is still not an orange. If you want both you have to purchase the orange too.

I don't expect the subscription model to replace their current revenue stream. Too many users are moving to devices and OSes that don't have that hook in them. They would need some solid inducement to start paying extra for what they have come to feel is a standard, basic feature.

Something else would have to be put in place. The cloud is frequently cited as a possibility but analyst Keith Weiss at Morgan Stanley sees it as a gap rather than a support.

http://blogs.barrons.com/techtraderdaily/2014/08/12/microsoft-is-th...

His opinion is one out of many, but even though I am not a corporate finance maven I saw it much the same way just based on general news and announcements rather than a detailed analysis.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: subscription?
by tylerdurden on Sat 23rd Aug 2014 20:05 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: subscription?"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

True that a UNIX system wouldn't stop running if your [support] contract ran out. But you could get cut off from at least some of the premium updates, ala Solaris.


Actually some Unix (and other high end systems like OpenVMS) would not work unless their licenses were up to date. This was before the term "subscription" had made it to the buzzword business stream, but the spirit was the same. This also applied not just the OS, but lots of software packages were structured under the same deal of temporary recurring licenses.

I think the extreme case was the big IBM iron, which customers did not technically "own" as much as they "rented" it.

This is nothing new... the internet allows for more agile delivery/billing methods though. That's perhaps the bigger difference. But the essence of the strategy remains the same: allow a vendor to capture guaranteed recurring revenue streams.

Reply Score: 6

RE[3]: subscription?
by moondevil on Sun 24th Aug 2014 05:58 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: subscription?"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Besides what others already replied, it is common in the enterprise to rent commercial UNIX systems.

This means you not only get the software, but the hardware boxes as well.

The support contract most of the time, allows for the said systems to kept up to date to the latest versions.

The is not unique to UNIX, other enterprise systems like OpenVMS (already mentioned), OS/400, ClearPath and others, follow similar procedures.

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: subscription?
by Morgan on Sun 24th Aug 2014 14:26 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: subscription?"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

But I haven't heard of subscribing to UNIX systems before. I tried searching for it and didn't find anything either.


I pay a monthly fee to access a VPS running GNU/Linux; isn't that basically the same thing? If I don't pay the monthly fee, I'm locked out of the VPS, so I'm literally subscribing to access a UNIX-like OS.

Not that I think a subscription model would work well with the average Windows user. For over 25 years now, when you buy a PC you get a complete system with a working OS that doesn't stop working after the first year. Many people will buy a new PC after four or so years, and with it comes the new version of Windows that again will continue to work, barring a corrupted hard drive or malware attack. But the license allows them to use that OS more or less indefinitely.

Now, imagine that same huge segment of the PC buying population being told that their computer will stop working after a year, unless they pay a subscription fee to Microsoft on top of the upfront cost of the PC. I'd be willing to bet money that a significant portion of those customers would start looking elsewhere, perhaps to the company that also makes their iPhone or iPad. I don't think Microsoft would shoot themselves in the foot like that. Then again, it's not the same company it once was, so anything is possible. It would be a terrible idea, though.

Reply Score: 4

RE[4]: subscription?
by ezraz on Mon 25th Aug 2014 15:29 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: subscription?"
ezraz Member since:
2012-06-20

i agree overall but keep in mind real apple users are basically on an apple subscription:

there's your iPhone + maybe your 3G iPad monthly, +
30% of all your iTunes and apps purchases, +
the latest gadget like appleTV or beats headphones for xmas, +
the 2nd or third mac for family or business, +
a new iPhone every 2-4 years, +
a new mac every 3-5 years, +
an endless demand for $29.99 white adapter cables.

microsoft just wants a piece of that monthly that everyone else gets (netflix, cable, mobile, server bills, debt consolidation :-))

Reply Score: 0

v RE: subscription?
by hallux on Sat 23rd Aug 2014 08:58 UTC in reply to "subscription?"
RE[2]: subscription?
by BluenoseJake on Sat 23rd Aug 2014 12:10 UTC in reply to "RE: subscription?"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

1997 called, it wants it's huge wall of hate back...

Reply Score: 7

RE[2]: subscription?
by Dano on Sat 23rd Aug 2014 15:52 UTC in reply to "RE: subscription?"
Dano Member since:
2006-01-22

That bottle of wine is going to age much better than you will. Every platform requires patches and tweaks as new technology evolves, new hardware is developed and new exploits are discovered and created. Operating systems are complex software. The reason people pay to maintain their Windows setups is because the platform runs applications that work well for them. And to say that the Windows releases are just a new coat of paint is just silly.

Edited 2014-08-23 15:54 UTC

Reply Score: 5

RE: subscription?
by bassbeast on Sun 24th Aug 2014 09:39 UTC in reply to "subscription?"
bassbeast Member since:
2007-11-11

The rumors I've read say nope, it'll have a pay version and a "powered by Bing" free version and as far as subscription goes the rumor is they are gonna offer features ala carte so if you say have Win 9 Home but want Bitlocker or Windows 2 Go you'll be able to buy just the features you want which sounds REALLY nice. But the only subscription rumors I've seen is an Office 365 style offer for SMBs and corps.

So does anybody know if the dev preview will be open to all, or will we have to wait for the consumer preview?

Reply Score: 2

Comment by drcouzelis
by drcouzelis on Fri 22nd Aug 2014 14:49 UTC
drcouzelis
Member since:
2010-01-11

Microsoft is really stepping up its release schedule.

My thought here is totally anecdotal, but I'm interested in people's opinions. ;)

I installed Arch Linux in 2009. It was the first time I'd heard of the rolling release style of package management and I quickly became hooked on it. I never want to go back to what I was doing before, waiting months or even years for one big grand release. If there's an update to an application or a new feature is added to the kernel that is deemed stable, why should I wait for it? I want it now!

Since then, it seems like the development of so many operating systems have had changes to them, almost to "compete" with this model in a sense. Windows releases are a little more frequent with earlier development previews. Mac OS X releases are annual. Ubuntu now does rolling releases of select software such as Firefox to keep old releases current. openSUSE and Linux Mint now have rolling release versions. Haiku has had an alpha release four years in a row. ;)

Has the trend in the past five years been for the release schedules to be more frequent, for both closed source and open source operating systems?

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by drcouzelis
by WorknMan on Fri 22nd Aug 2014 15:46 UTC in reply to "Comment by drcouzelis"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

With Windows, I kinda wish we could go back to the 6-7 year release cycle we had with XP/Vista. I just don't find that any of the changes they make are ever worth the hassle of upgrading, yet I do it anyway because I'm sort of the default tech support for my friends and family, so I need to stay current. If not, I probably would've ran XP until the day they stopped supporting it. Things just tend to work more smoothly when things stay as they are for a long time. You don't have to worry about whether some hardware device that was released 6 months ago is going to work with the new version or not.

Reply Score: 9

RE: Comment by drcouzelis
by shmerl on Fri 22nd Aug 2014 22:15 UTC in reply to "Comment by drcouzelis"
shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

There is a benefit in some stable base. If you split the base and certain applications which you want to update more frequently, it works out not so bad. Pure rolling nature keeps you up to date, but introduces other issues which are hard to iron out (ABI breakage, libc updates and so on).

So both approaches have pluses and minuses.

Edited 2014-08-22 22:16 UTC

Reply Score: 4

v RE: Comment by drcouzelis
by shillshocked on Sat 23rd Aug 2014 04:08 UTC in reply to "Comment by drcouzelis"
RE[2]: Comment by drcouzelis
by judgen on Sat 23rd Aug 2014 12:56 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by drcouzelis"
judgen Member since:
2006-07-12

That is morally dispicable, no! ebola is an simple for of virus and can be cured as the ft laramie experiments shows, the problem is only in the cost. Yes it is expensive and yes Africa is underdeveloped, and currently the cure is very expensive. That is not reason enough to kill them all through quarantine, it is a reason to mass produce the cure though through charitable means.

Edited 2014-08-23 12:57 UTC

Reply Score: 2

that should be fun for business
by rtfa on Sat 23rd Aug 2014 16:34 UTC
rtfa
Member since:
2006-02-27

Having to consider upgrading more often so they don't get left behind

Reply Score: 2

Give us free upgrade Microsoft
by TusharG on Sun 24th Aug 2014 02:48 UTC
TusharG
Member since:
2005-07-06

I hope the upgrade to Windows 9 will be free for Windows 8/8.1 users. I just purchased costly Windows 8.1 laptop a month ago and I cannot stand the idea of my OS becoming obsolete in just months time!
Between I have started evaluating various Linux options for my laptop. So far Ubuntu-Gnome seems the best distro for touch friendly laptops.

Reply Score: 2