Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 2nd Nov 2016 23:36 UTC
Games

In a few hours of testing, I haven't seen any noticeable problems with the graphic or sound recreation on the NES Classic Edition. Even the flickering and slowdown issues that were a forced part of that original NES game design seem to be captured accurately.

Colors are rendered brightly and accurately (unlike similar NES emulation on the Wii, Wii U, and 3DS), with big, sharp pixels by default. So far, I'm really enjoying the CRT filter, which adds a pleasant fuzziness to the edges of the sprites without being distracting.

Sounds like a winner. Too bad the device doesn't include the ability to install additional games.

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Comment by ssokolow
by ssokolow on Thu 3rd Nov 2016 02:44 UTC
ssokolow
Member since:
2010-01-21

Now I just need to wait for someone to figure out how to extract the ROMs from the thing so I can use it as a cheaper alternative to cartridges and a dumper for the NES games that weren't waiting to be extracted from my copy of Animal Crossing.

(These days, I'll never play a game unless the play environment I get used to involves DRM-free backups that run on commodity hardware, yet are insulated from platform changes by running on top of an open-source abstraction like dosbox, scummvm, fceux, snes9x, mupen64plus, Wine, or, if all else fails, KVM and an older distro release.)

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by ssokolow
by flanque on Thu 3rd Nov 2016 05:08 UTC in reply to "Comment by ssokolow"
flanque Member since:
2005-12-15

Now I just need to wait for someone to figure out how to extract the ROMs from the thing so I can use it as a cheaper alternative to cartridges and a dumper for the NES games that weren't waiting to be extracted from my copy of Animal Crossing.

(These days, I'll never play a game unless the play environment I get used to involves DRM-free backups that run on commodity hardware, yet are insulated from platform changes by running on top of an open-source abstraction like dosbox, scummvm, fceux, snes9x, mupen64plus, Wine, or, if all else fails, KVM and an older distro release.)

Hasn't Nintendo come a long way!

Edited 2016-11-03 05:09 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by ssokolow
by ssokolow on Thu 3rd Nov 2016 09:26 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by ssokolow"
ssokolow Member since:
2010-01-21

Hasn't Nintendo come a long way!


In what sense? They tried to get video game rental banned around the world and actually succeeded in Japan.

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J3xuy5YALl0

Reply Score: 2

NTSC color space
by CaptainN- on Thu 3rd Nov 2016 20:12 UTC
CaptainN-
Member since:
2005-07-07

I believe older TVs used a wider gamut than sRGB, which has become standard for modern 1080p and lower TVs, and computer screens. 4K (UHD) TVs, iPhones and Macs are now using a slightly wider P3 color space, but even that isn't as wide as older TVs were (I can't find a definitive source, but I thought I read that older TV standards were NTSC color space).

I wonder whether Nintendo applies a color profile, or simply bumps up the colors in some other way to make it look more like the colors of the yore. With the increasing migration from sRBG to P3, using color management profile would make more sense, but I also wonder whether the reviewer is simply using a 4K screen with P3 - that would make the colors more vibrant just by itself (and it would do so for the Wii-U too).

As a side note, many PC game ports from the xbox 360 era benefit from increasing the "digital vibrance" (which has the effect of super saturating colors) when playing them on an sRGB color computer monitor. It's been a while since I gamed regularly, so I'm not sure whether that is still a useful life hack.

Reply Score: 3