Linked by Eugenia Loli on Wed 13th Feb 2002 04:30 UTC
Features, Office With the release of MacOSX, Apple has engineered and released two new APIs: Carbon & Cocoa. Carbon is similar to MacOS 9 API and it can be programmed in C & C++. Carbon was created in order to give Macintosh developers an easy-to-walk "bridge" to easily port their MacOS applications to OSX. Through the CarbonLib, developers can now develop both MacOSX and MacOS9 applications with a single effort. Cocoa is the fully native MacOSX API; it gives access to more MacOSX-specific features and it can be programmed with Objective-C or Java. Apple, through O'Reilly, last year released two books, "Learning Carbon" and "Learning Cocoa".
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One two single dual ;)
by Sander on Wed 13th Feb 2002 09:26 UTC

"can now develop both MacOSX and MacOS9 applications with a

single

effort."


"Cocoa is the fully native MacOSX API; it gives access to more MacOSX-specific features and it can be programmed with Objective-C or Java. Apple, through O'Reilly, last year released

two

books, "Learning Carbon" and "Learning Cocoa"."

hmm ok ;)

Objective-C++
by Ludovic Hirlimann on Wed 13th Feb 2002 17:58 UTC

Is also available. with it you canb combine your legacy C++ code with Apples GUI/Rad tools which devilvers in Objective-C

cool
by Kevin on Wed 13th Feb 2002 18:54 UTC

Carbon and coca look nice... man... I wish I had a mac to play around with...

Hmm, anyone want to trade me a G4 with MacOS X for a 366 MHz PC? ;)

Good review btw!

not to nitpick
by Anonymous on Wed 13th Feb 2002 19:01 UTC

But Carbon was been around for a while now, not just with the release of OS X.

IIRC, Carbon came about after Jobs came back. They cleaned up and distilled APIs from the old MacToolBox

Oreilly books
by Fernando lopez on Wed 13th Feb 2002 22:45 UTC

This Oreilly books has disappoint me. Oreilly has always published the best books but those are short, incomplete and unfinished.

I wish Apple engineers soon publish a good serie of Inside Cocoa and Inside Carbon books.

.
by lu_zero on Thu 14th Feb 2002 18:11 UTC

hmmm Coccoa and GNUStep are quite similar even if GnuStep isn't so evoluted.
Most code may be ported easly from one side to the other and with a little more efford the opposite.
Anyway is nice=)