Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 30th Jul 2009 16:44 UTC
Red Hat The CentOS project, the Linux distribution aimed at the enterprise built from Red Hat's freely available source code, has hit a significant bump in the road: the project's main administrator, Lance Davis, has gone missing-in-action. This is kind of a problem as Davis is the sole administrator fo the CentOS.org domain, the IRC channels - and the CentOS funds.
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This is what I call...
by Liquidator on Thu 30th Jul 2009 17:13 UTC
Liquidator
Member since:
2007-03-04

...A single point of failure.

Reply Score: 4

RE: This is what I call...
by Quake on Thu 30th Jul 2009 17:18 UTC in reply to "This is what I call..."
Quake Member since:
2005-10-14

Yup... just like a Napster... I guess it's time to go P2P ;) ...

Reply Score: 1

Hope all is well
by Mettadore on Thu 30th Jul 2009 17:19 UTC
Mettadore
Member since:
2009-07-30

Personally, I hope that he DID ditch the project for a while, because one alternative is that he, or a member of his family has been seriously injured or killed. I say this only because it has actually happened to a good friend of mine. Let's all hope for the best, for both him and for CentOS.

Reply Score: 7

RE: Hope all is well
by segedunum on Fri 31st Jul 2009 00:07 UTC in reply to "Hope all is well"
segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

Given that the developers believe that he is alive and well, money has been taken from Paypal donations and ads and someone is still doing something with the CentOS domain name then this can't be explained by a mishap.

The main thing is the domain name control. If they sort that out then everything else is fixable. The source code is, after all, still there.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Hope all is well
by thinker5555 on Fri 31st Jul 2009 08:37 UTC in reply to "Hope all is well"
thinker5555 Member since:
2008-01-13

I hope so, too. About three weeks ago we had a guy at work that was a no-call/no-show. My understanding is that he had a bit of a habit of doing that, so no one really thought much of it except, "is this the time he'll get fired?". We found out at about 11:00am that he had died in an accident on the way to work that morning. He was only about a quarter of a mile away.

Reply Score: 0

WEll...
by darknexus on Thu 30th Jul 2009 17:22 UTC
darknexus
Member since:
2008-07-15

I certainly hope nothing has happened to him, but at least with it being an open source project and all it can be forked/renamed/whatever is needed if necessary. Still, I hope he's ok.

Reply Score: 2

RE: WEll...
by Quake on Thu 30th Jul 2009 17:27 UTC in reply to "WEll..."
Quake Member since:
2005-10-14

True, I hope he's ok, but being a single point of failure is bad business sense. You never know what can happen to you.

Which why we have vice-presidents, Vice-Ceo...

Reply Score: 1

Top 5
by fretinator on Thu 30th Jul 2009 17:25 UTC
fretinator
Member since:
2005-07-06

Top 5 signs your open-source project is in trouble
--------------------------------------------------------------
5. Lately, a lot of check-ins are from J.R. "Bob" Dobbs
4. Cell-tower operators blame you for their power failures
3. You're sold at Walmart
2. Your project leader takes the summer off for band camp
1. Mcrosoft partners with you

Reply Score: 12

RE: Top 5
by poundsmack on Thu 30th Jul 2009 17:54 UTC in reply to "Top 5"
poundsmack Member since:
2005-07-13

6: Each year you proclaim that THIS is teh year of the linux desktop.

Reply Score: 3

v This...
by ferrels on Thu 30th Jul 2009 17:51 UTC
RE: This...
by AdamW on Thu 30th Jul 2009 17:58 UTC in reply to "This..."
AdamW Member since:
2005-07-06

Er. Did you miss the bit about CentOS being a free-as-in-beer clone of Red Hat Enterprise Linux?

If you want something with dependable support behind it, buy Red Hat. That's what we sell. We're a Fortune 500 company with hundreds of millions of dollars in annual revenue, we're not going anywhere. And we sell a wide range of support options that are rather highly regarded.

The openness of the code has nothing whatsoever to do with the quality of the support available.

Reply Score: 12

RE[2]: This...
by ferrels on Thu 30th Jul 2009 18:01 UTC in reply to "RE: This..."
ferrels Member since:
2006-08-15

That was exactly my point. My first sentence should have read "free opensource" instead of just opensource. My bad.

Edited 2009-07-30 18:02 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: This...
by AdamW on Thu 30th Jul 2009 22:48 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: This..."
AdamW Member since:
2005-07-06

Ah. That would have made a lot more sense, then. ;)

It's still not entirely accurate, though. There's a crossover point at which it becomes more efficient to buy external support than do your own. That crossover point could lie at several different points along several different curves depending on the project and company you're talking about. It's going to be different for a heavily tech-focused company and a pet food company, for instance. It's going to be different for an internal project in the IT department versus a project rolled out to the entire company and on which all your revenue depends. It's going to be different for a 5-person company compared to a 10,000-person company.

There's clearly many situations in which running enterprise-grade bits but doing the support yourself makes sense, which is why CentOS and similar things exist in the first place. All it comes down to is the management job of correctly identifying whether you're in a case where it makes more sense to run CentOS (or Debian, or whatever) and do your own support, or buy in RHEL (or SLED or Mandriva Corporate or whatever).

Reply Score: 7

RE[3]: This...
by Gone fishing on Fri 31st Jul 2009 11:19 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: This..."
Gone fishing Member since:
2006-02-22

I don't think there's any evidence for this statement. I don’t believe that Debian or Ubuntu or many other free distributions will disappear in the next few weeks.

Reply Score: 2

RE: This...
by umccullough on Thu 30th Jul 2009 18:02 UTC in reply to "This..."
umccullough Member since:
2006-01-26

Imagine buying a car and then needing to get it serviced only to find that all the dealers and service departments locked the doors and left with a sign on the door saying, "We'll be back when we feel like it."


No, more like they left the doors open and said: "We simply don't feel like fixing your car for free today, but feel free to fix it yourself, or hire a real mechanic you can depend on, btw the service manual is on the table here."

Edit: also, you misspoke, you meant to say: "Imagine being given a car for free"

Edited 2009-07-30 18:12 UTC

Reply Score: 6

RE[2]: This...
by bryanv on Thu 30th Jul 2009 18:47 UTC in reply to "RE: This..."
bryanv Member since:
2005-08-26

If they left the tools behind, I'd LOVE that.

For once I could pay cost of parts and not get raped by 1.) Needing Special tools I don't have / can't afford
and
2.) Outrageous Labor charges based on billable hours inflated three-fold listed in a book.

I know good mechanics that do 20 billable hours in an 8 hour day.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: This...
by umccullough on Thu 30th Jul 2009 18:57 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: This..."
umccullough Member since:
2006-01-26

If they left the tools behind, I'd LOVE that.


Sadly, in the case of CentOS, it seems some of the tools are missing, and the shop has no power on ;)

So you might be better off taking a copy of the service manual and going elsewhere if things don't improve...

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: This...
by Bounty on Thu 30th Jul 2009 19:04 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: This..."
Bounty Member since:
2006-09-18

GPL question. Can they take the code and bring up CentOS.net or .info whatever and start new forums say "ahh darn it" to the 1 time lost funds, start new funds? Then change all the .org references in the code and call it good? Keep the logos etc?

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: This...
by umccullough on Thu 30th Jul 2009 19:48 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: This..."
umccullough Member since:
2006-01-26

GPL question. Can they take the code and bring up CentOS.net or .info whatever and start new forums say "ahh darn it" to the 1 time lost funds, start new funds? Then change all the .org references in the code and call it good? Keep the logos etc?


Actually, that's a trademark question, not a GPL question. They can do this as long as the original trademark owner doesn't fight them. It's the responsibility of trademark owners to protect their marks, otherwise they may lose them.

Reply Score: 2

RE: This...
by daddio on Thu 30th Jul 2009 18:04 UTC in reply to "This..."
daddio Member since:
2007-07-14

That is a stupid thing to say.

Businesses rely on 3rd party contractors that are just one guy (single point of failure) all the time.

While occasionally you do have somebody just disappear, the fruits of having work done by a small time operation are always cheaper, and often better quality (due to the work/bull#$^% ratio being higher) that contracting with a big organization like IBM who then assigns 3 salespeople a few junior technical workers to "manage" your business account.

But that single point of failure will bite a business just as it will an OSS project.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: This...
by sbergman27 on Thu 30th Jul 2009 19:09 UTC in reply to "RE: This..."
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

Businesses rely on 3rd party contractors that are just one guy (single point of failure) all the time.

Smart businesses avoid single points of failure where they can. This was trivially avoidable and should never have been allowed by policy. That is the point to be concerned about here. It's not like they haven't had over 5 years to notice and address the issue.

Reply Score: 2

RE: This...
by Soulbender on Thu 30th Jul 2009 18:15 UTC in reply to "This..."
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

"We'll be back when we feel like it."


Because no commercial entity has ever went bankrupt or close doors over night. Nope, has never happened. If you've ever paid for a product the company will care about you forever.

Reply Score: 8

RE[2]: This...
by KermitTheFragger on Thu 30th Jul 2009 20:41 UTC in reply to "RE: This..."
KermitTheFragger Member since:
2008-06-12

Exactly, and no corporate entity has ever been taken over and the new owners told you: No more updates for you mister; But thank god you can migrate to our really really really great other product......for a price.

Or companies where you need to buy a support contract to be able to file bug reports about their bug ridden product (*cough* Cisco *cough*). And then perhaps, by the grace of god, they might actually fix your show stopper bug in year.

No sir, never heard of those kind of companies.

I'm not saying open source is the best and the cure for everything, but you sure are naive if you think commercial cooperation's are there to protect your interest.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: This...
by ferrels on Fri 31st Jul 2009 14:47 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: This..."
ferrels Member since:
2006-08-15

OK, go get your free car and when it breaks down, wait for the community to fix it. Never mind that you're on the way to the hospital.

Same goes for your free opensource OS. I'm trying to run a business and wham, my web server running the free opensource OS goes down. So I'm just going to wait for the "community" to fix it for me? You must be crazy. That's why people buy an OS instead of relying on something they got for free. They can pick up the phone and get support because there are employees on the other end who want to get paid and have a job. Try calling CentOS right now and getting some support. I'm glad I'm not using their software!

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: This...
by ruel24 on Fri 31st Jul 2009 14:24 UTC in reply to "RE: This..."
ruel24 Member since:
2006-03-21

""We'll be back when we feel like it."


Because no commercial entity has ever went bankrupt or close doors over night. Nope, has never happened. If you've ever paid for a product the company will care about you forever.
"

You wish! Have you dealt with very many customer service reps? Few companies truly have very good customer service. At least with Open Source, you get more than what you paid for because you pay nothing.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: This...
by Soulbender on Fri 31st Jul 2009 17:12 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: This..."
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Your irony detector is not working.

Reply Score: 3

RE: This...
by HeLfReZ on Thu 30th Jul 2009 18:32 UTC in reply to "This..."
HeLfReZ Member since:
2005-08-12

Or the company that built the car and millions of other could be worth billions of $ and still fold and be shuttered leaving you with a modern car with no dedicated support.

You would be forced to get support elsewhere, or if you're lucky the other companies would pick up the slack and provide maintainance to you for some reasonable amoutn of time.

You're right, that would never happen in a paid product! Heaven forbid a billion dollar corporation like car companies..I mean what's the likelihood of someone like General Motors going bankrupt and shuttering a whole division like Saturn, leaving owner in the lurch...nah would never happen...

Reply Score: 5

RE[2]: This...
by umccullough on Thu 30th Jul 2009 18:45 UTC in reply to "RE: This..."
umccullough Member since:
2006-01-26

Or the company that built the car and millions of other could be worth billions of $ and still fold and be shuttered leaving you with a modern car with no dedicated support.


Precisely why Open Source (Free or not) is better than proprietary closed source.

In the end, at least you have the ability to fix it yourself, or hire someone else to fix it.

With proprietary closed source, you are basically...dead in the water.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: This...
by ferrels on Fri 31st Jul 2009 14:40 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: This..."
ferrels Member since:
2006-08-15

That's bull. Just because an OS is free and opensource doesn't mean I have (or almost any other entity) the tools, and experience to fix it. That's like saying that because I own and operate a television, then I can fix one when it fails. NOT! Unless you have the resources of a small army or a large IT dev staff, you're out of luck if your free and opensource OS has problems. Waiting for the "community" to fix your problem is not an option when time is money and you run a business.

If I buy an OS or a car and the maker goes out of business, there are still options. There are always 2nd and 3rd parties who will continue to provide support. That's why free opensource OSs will never be adopted by mainstream businesses.

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: This...
by sbergman27 on Fri 31st Jul 2009 14:47 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: This..."
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

If I buy an OS or a car and the maker goes out of business, there are still options. There are always 2nd and 3rd parties who will continue to provide support. That's why free opensource OSs will never be adopted by mainstream businesses.

1995 called. They want their bizarre misconceptions back.
In case you haven't noticed, major OSS products aleady *do* have second and third party support providers, in an assortment of free and commercial forms. And open-source OSes already *have* been adopted by mainstream businesses. Especially on the server end.

What decade *do* you come from, anyway?

Edited 2009-07-31 14:48 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: This...
by ferrels on Fri 31st Jul 2009 15:02 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: This..."
ferrels Member since:
2006-08-15

Yeah right. Try picking up the phone right now and calling someone to fix my broken web server running CentOS. Or any other free opensource OS.

Reply Score: 1

RE[6]: This...
by sbergman27 on Fri 31st Jul 2009 15:26 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: This..."
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

Yeah right. Try picking up the phone right now and calling someone to fix my broken web server running CentOS. Or any other free opensource OS.

They can call me. Supporting Linux (desktop, server, other) for businesses is one of the things that I do professionally. Twenty-one years of prefessional Unix administration. Fourteen years experience with Linux. Lot's of experience with Windows integration. Happy customers all around. (They actually tell me so.) And Linux is what I have used exclusively on my own desktop and servers since 1998. (And nonexclusively since 1995.)

And there are much larger fish than me doing the same.

Small world, isn't it?

Edited 2009-07-31 15:45 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: This...
by ferrels on Fri 31st Jul 2009 16:54 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: This..."
ferrels Member since:
2006-08-15

Yeah, and I suppose you have an office in every major city and rural area too. Who do you think you are, Santa Clause? You can't be everywhere.

Or do you expect me to pay for your flight when I live 2500 miles from you? No, I'll call a local IT support shop who can fix the OS that I paid for from his store and it will be fixed in a few hours at a reasonable price.

And using Linux and other free OSs on YOUR desktop is just fine, since you're in the IT business. Most business owners aren't running IT businesses.

Edited 2009-07-31 17:04 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE[5]: This...
by ferrels on Fri 31st Jul 2009 15:04 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: This..."
ferrels Member since:
2006-08-15

And I'm not talking about IT companies who have large IT staffs who can internally support a "free" opensource OS. If you haven't noticed, most of the worlds businesses are not IT companies and they don't have the tools or expertise of fix their OS when it fails or needs support. They have to rely on external sources for that.

That's why "free" opensource OSs will not be adopted by mainstream businesses. They cannot afford to be shut down while the "community" comes up with a fix.

Edited 2009-07-31 15:08 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE: This...
by apoclypse on Thu 30th Jul 2009 19:22 UTC in reply to "This..."
apoclypse Member since:
2007-02-17

Umm. This happens regardless of the software being opensource or not. There are plenty of instances of commercial companies going bust or closing shop without leaving much recourse to their customers and in those instances customers have actually PAYED for the software. At least with OSS, the software is free and open and anyone willing can take the ball and run with it. You are not left with an unsupported piece of software that no one can improve if they wanted to. As long as there is an active development community around the software and the code is open then there really isn't an issue other than a fork and a name change if the situation warrants it. Can you do that with Truespace?

Reply Score: 3

RE: This...
by StephenBeDoper on Thu 30th Jul 2009 20:17 UTC in reply to "This..."
StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

is exactly why many businesses will never opt for a "free" opensource OS. Imagine buying a car and then needing to get it serviced only to find that all the dealers and service departments locked the doors and left with a sign on the door saying, "We'll be back when we feel like it."


When choosing software, the question of "will they still be around/actively-developed in a year" is certainly important. But - while I'm personally cynical of the view that open source is a "magic bullet" - I still think there are other factors that have more relevance to that question than the development model.

In general, I think that the overall "ecosystem" of a piece of software is more important than whether the software is commercial or open source. To pick a near-and-dear example, look at web-based CMS software. Say you have the choice between a commercial app with a small number of devs and a relatively small userbase - and an open source app like WordPress, with thousands (millions?) of users and a thriving community of plugin developers, etc.

In that scenario, I know which one I would consider to be a safer bet (the latter).

Reply Score: 3

RE: This...
by dagw on Thu 30th Jul 2009 20:43 UTC in reply to "This..."
dagw Member since:
2005-07-06

I've had exactly the same thing happen with closed source software at a few different companies I've worked for. We buy some software and the next thing you know the company has gone bankrupt or dropped support for your platform or simply stop answering the phone and you're left with unsupported software without any future updates. At least with open source you still have the source and can still get support and updates from other places.

Reply Score: 2

RE: This...
by mabhatter on Fri 31st Jul 2009 02:14 UTC in reply to "This..."
mabhatter Member since:
2005-07-17

is exactly why many businesses will never opt for a "free" opensource OS. Imagine buying a car and then needing to get it serviced only to find that all the dealers and service departments locked the doors and left with a sign on the door saying, "We'll be back when we feel like it."

With a free opensource OS, there's simply no way to hold anyone responsible unless you pay a second or third party to maintain it for you. In most cases, the old adage "You get what you pay for" still applies.


Bad analogy because that's exactly what happened when Chrysler closed a bunch of dealerships and revoked their right to service my car! Happens all the time. I chose that dealership because I didn't like the service of the other one. Of course find somebody to fix the bugs in Windows XP that you need for a critical project. You might as well be using Be.

Reply Score: 2

RE: This...
by Soulbender on Fri 31st Jul 2009 10:30 UTC in reply to "This..."
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

is exactly why many businesses will never opt for a "free" opensource OS.


Serious businesses evaluate which option is the best in each case and pick accordingly. Sometimes that will be a free Linux, sometimes it will be one with commercial support.

With a free opensource OS, there's simply no way to hold anyone responsible unless you pay a second or third party to maintain it for you.


Most companies don't get their Windows support directly from MS but from 2nd or 3rd parties. What's the difference?

Reply Score: 2

White Slavery
by sbergman27 on Thu 30th Jul 2009 18:07 UTC
sbergman27
Member since:
2005-07-24

Reliable underground sources have informed me that Lance was seen being abducted by agents of The City of Tuttle, and is likely on his way to the auction block now. As I live about 20 minutes from Tuttle (Yes, really.) I'm heading there now. I'll let you know what happened when I return. If I return...

Edited 2009-07-30 18:12 UTC

Reply Score: 6

Poor way to handle the situation
by sbergman27 on Thu 30th Jul 2009 18:37 UTC
sbergman27
Member since:
2005-07-24

Regardless of the reliability of OSS software support in general, this was a poor way for the "Community ENTerprise OS" to deal with the situation. Even once it was determined that some sort of general call needed to be put out, there was no reason to prepackage sensationalism in the open letter itself.

The CentOS team normally conducts themselves in a highly professional manner. This is quite out of character for them. And they did recently report a break in on one of their servers: http://lwn.net/Articles/340130/

Hmmmm....

Edited 2009-07-30 18:39 UTC

Reply Score: 2

segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

I agree really. Apparently they've been trying to get something out of Lance for over a year and it's obvious he has been acting improperly. They should have then just moved to make sure they had control of the domain name and then completely disassociated themselves and CentOS from him.

If you're going to act then do it. The sensationalism wasn't necessray and an open letter cannot possibly achieve anything now after what has happened.

Reply Score: 2

mabhatter Member since:
2005-07-17

they need a way to get on public record saying this guy is gone rogue so they can move to replace him. Obviously, he's not restricted the website, but if THEY are accepting money (as some type of not-for-profit organization) then THEY have to account for it or have big problems. Getting a new domain name isn't the problem, moving to new servers or hosting isn't the problem, it's accounting for the "common property" of the group and funds other people have given them.

Reply Score: 2

segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

Mind you, with hindsight a kick probably wasn't such a bad idea............

Reply Score: 2

sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

According to centos.org, Lance showed back up (after years) and they had a "routine meeting" in which much was resolved. Though how they could have a "routine meeting" under the circumstances, and less than a day after the publication of that open letter, is unclear.

Edited 2009-08-01 23:40 UTC

Reply Score: 2

hmmm
by Bounty on Thu 30th Jul 2009 18:38 UTC
Bounty
Member since:
2006-09-18

"Our project leader has vanished."

"Again? awwww fork it."

Reply Score: 5

Will wait a bit
by acobar on Thu 30th Jul 2009 19:11 UTC
acobar
Member since:
2005-11-15

As someone already said, the case would trigger a fork if he doesn´t show-up again.

Anyway, if everything fail, there are still 2 options:
* Go to Red Hat;
* Test Scientific Linux compatibility.

Hope he will show-up and that all disputs get settled.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Will wait a bit
by visconde_de_sabugosa on Thu 30th Jul 2009 19:24 UTC in reply to "Will wait a bit"
visconde_de_sabugosa Member since:
2005-11-14

Yes, Scientific Linux is a valid option made by serious institutions

https://www.scientificlinux.org/

SL is a Linux release put together by Fermilab, CERN, and various other labs and universities around the world. Its primary purpose is to reduce duplicated effort of the labs, and to have a common install base for the various experimenters.

The base SL distribution is basically Enterprise Linux, recompiled from source.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Will wait a bit
by Soulbender on Fri 31st Jul 2009 10:24 UTC in reply to "Will wait a bit"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

As someone already said, the case would trigger a fork if he doesn´t show-up again


That's not the serious problem here though. The problem is the funds that only he knows where they are and what they went to.

Reply Score: 2

Sad state of affairs
by strcpy on Thu 30th Jul 2009 19:53 UTC
strcpy
Member since:
2009-05-20

Disclaimer: I have no idea what this "missing in action" really means. Are we talking about days? Weeks? Months? Even the last one can (could) be justified in community projects.

Nevertheless, a sad state of affairs. I have been a big fan of CentOS. Mainly because it, as a community project, stands out in the current state of affairs, dominated by endless pseudo-usability trends, FooKits of the week, too short support cycles, too rapid development cycles at the cost of stability and good software engineering practices, endless experiments with core components of the system, increasing complexity, ever-growing pile of bugs, et. cetera. (Real credit obviously goes to Red Hat.)

When you want to get work done and try to minimize moving parts in an arguably shaky overall system, CentOS is a good choice.

PS.

I might try Scientific Linux if this turns out to be a catastrophe.

Edited 2009-07-30 19:54 UTC

Reply Score: 2

They should fork
by drcoldfoot on Fri 31st Jul 2009 02:50 UTC
drcoldfoot
Member since:
2006-08-25

The CentOS project was a lifesaver in my career. I hope that there is a resolution, But if not, FORK IT.

Reply Score: 1

Comment by andy_js
by andy_js on Fri 31st Jul 2009 07:39 UTC
andy_js
Member since:
2008-02-29

FORK EVERYTHING!

Reply Score: 1

Rinse & Repeat
by Lo_Phat on Fri 31st Jul 2009 09:22 UTC
Lo_Phat
Member since:
2009-07-08

This happens so monotonously regularly with Linux distro's.

New distro ->Fork->fork again, abandoned.
Yet another new distro ->fork, ->fork->fork again, abandoned..

Reply Score: 1

RE: Rinse & Repeat
by ferrels on Fri 31st Jul 2009 14:50 UTC in reply to "Rinse & Repeat"
ferrels Member since:
2006-08-15

Exactly. Linux is in forking hell! That's why my company sticks to commercial OSs.

The old adage "You get what you pay for" still applies.

Reply Score: 1

Ouch!
by Kebabbert on Fri 31st Jul 2009 13:31 UTC
Kebabbert
Member since:
2007-07-27

I hope everything settles out fine. But it is always possible to fork the project if necessary. Anyway, Open Source FTW! \o/

Reply Score: 2

RE: Ouch!
by sbergman27 on Fri 31st Jul 2009 13:54 UTC in reply to "Ouch!"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

But it is always possible to fork the project if necessary.

What's with this "fork-mania" in the OSS community these days? On several sites where this has been reported I have seen references to "forking" CentOS. Their admin has completely disappeared (for years now, it seems) and he owns the current domain and the irc channel. The existing CentOS team is all ready to cut over to a different domain at this point with the figurative press of a button. But they'd like to keep the old domain. Where, exactly is the "fork" in that?

If Red Hat moved their domain from redhat.com to redhatinc.com, would that be a "fork" of Red Hat Enterprise Linux?

Now, if you *really* mean "fork", then I suggest you look at the failed past attempts at forking and maintaining RHEL. It's not trivial. But somehow we've developed this culture where people have seen the word "fork" used so much that they think it's a trivial thing to do, with no real consequences.

Edited 2009-07-31 13:54 UTC

Reply Score: 3

StartCom
by tedlair on Fri 31st Jul 2009 19:54 UTC
tedlair
Member since:
2009-07-31

If you're afraid of CentOS future you can try an Israeli project based on RHEL - linux.startcom.org

Reply Score: 1

Comment by xiphos
by xiphos on Fri 31st Jul 2009 20:33 UTC
xiphos
Member since:
2009-07-31

Has anyone thought to check his house?
I know, wacky, physical interaction in this day and age.

Reply Score: 1

mafia tactics?
by wanker90210 on Sat 1st Aug 2009 20:34 UTC
wanker90210
Member since:
2007-10-26

If different Linux distros were State Contractors in New Jersey, I'd take a guess that the most mafia controlled State Contractor had taken out this guy since it seems like an easy way of letting the project suffer.

Reply Score: 1

Danger
by Different on Sun 2nd Aug 2009 08:24 UTC
Different
Member since:
2007-07-03

Although I admire the work done by the moderator, this is the danger when your company depend on a single person. If your business is using opensource I would suggest going for RedHat, Suse etc

Reply Score: 1