Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 28th May 2015 11:30 UTC
Games

A God In Ruins is a novel by the author Kate Atkinson, following on from a previous novel by the same author entitled Life After Life.

The book is 24 cm high and 16.2 cm wide. Across the main surface appears a predominantly brown background, depicting wooden boards. Upon them lies or hangs a rabbit, that is possibly dead, but could also be alive.

A great story about ethics in book journalism.

 

Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 28th May 2015 00:04 UTC
Legal

The Justice Department is weighing in on the hot-button intellectual property dispute between Google and Oracle, telling the Supreme Court that APIs are protected by copyright.

The Obama administration's position means it is siding with Oracle and a federal appeals court that said application programming interfaces are subject to copyright protections. The high court in January asked for the government's views on the closely watched case.

Words can't describe how stupid this is, so here's a picture of a bunny wearing a hat.

 



Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 27th May 2015 21:16 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless

The Verge reviews the Pebble Time - the new Pebble, with all-new hardware and all-new software. They conclude:

Right now, the Time is an accessory to your smartphone, which is exactly what Pebble wants it to be. But while other smartwatches feel like futuristic platforms that just need more refinement and purpose, it’s not clear how the Pebble Time could go beyond what it already is. It has smaller ambitions than Apple and Google, and for the most part, it already achieves those ambitions. The notifications could certainly get better, the timeline integrations could definitely get more plentiful, and the watch faces could get more colorful. But at the end of the day, it’s still a thing that you wear on your wrist so you don’t have to pick up your phone at every incoming text message.

Strange how what they see as a downside for the Pebble compared to Wear and the Apple Watch, I consider to be its strengths. Pebble doesn't waste battery and screen real estate on stuff that's just cumbersome on a watch and only serves to put a really, really complex, cumbersome, and slow UI on a tiny screen on your wrist. The Pebble definitely looks to be a lot more watch and a lot less computer than Google's and Android's offerings, and that's a good thing in my book - not a bad thing.

Much better battery life, always-on display, fast and responsive software, and a really simple and straightforward UI. Too bad that the regular Pebble Time isn't exactly the prettiest watch out there, but luckily, the Pebble Time Steel looks a little better. Still square though, so those of us who prefer round watches will have to wait around a bit longer.

 

Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 26th May 2015 23:31 UTC
Windows

Part of the power of a personal assistant comes from being available on the go, on the device you carry with you everywhere. And for people who don't have the benefit of a Windows phone, we want to extend the advantage of Cortana in Windows 10. How will this work? Today, we're announcing a Cortana application for Android phones and for iPhones which works as a companion to Cortana on your Windows 10 PC. The 'Phone Companion' app on the PC will help you install the Cortana app from the Google Play or Apple App Store onto your phone so you’ll be able to take the intelligence of Cortana with you, wherever you go.

I've never seen anyone use Siri, save for the occasional parlour trick and the odd one out using it to set alarms. I'm not sure these anthropomorphised ones and zeros are really as a big a deal as these companies want us to believe.

 

Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 26th May 2015 22:14 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless

Have you noticed an odd bulge in people's shorts around Accra?

It's likely because, like many of my friends, they've recently acquired a new phone. But it's not the iPhone 6 Plus, and it's not the Samsung Galaxy S6.

It's this thing.

I like it. It's functional and has a certain charm to it.

 

Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 26th May 2015 22:13 UTC
Mac OS X

After many complaints from the developer community about poor networking performance on Yosemite, the latest beta of OS X 10.10.4 has dropped the discoveryd in favor of the old process used by previous versions of Mac operating system. This should address many of the network stability issues introduced with Yosemite and its new networking stack.

A clearer sign that discoveryd was a mess, there is not.

 

Linked by nfeske on Tue 26th May 2015 19:11 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes

The just released version 15.05 of the Genode OS Framework is the most comprehensive release in the project's history. Among its highlights are a brand-new documentation in the form of a book, principal support for the seL4 microkernel, new infrastructure for user-level device drivers, and the feature completion of the framework's custom kernel.

For many years, the Genode OS project was primarily geared towards microkernel enthusiasts and the domain of high-security computing. With version 15.05, the project likes to widen its audience by complementing the release with the downloadable book "Genode Foundations" (PDF). The book equips the reader with a thorough understanding of the architecture, assists developers with the explanation of the development environment and system configuration, and provides a look under the hood of the framework. Furthermore, it contains the specification of the framework's programming interface. If you ever wondered what Genode is all about, the book may hopefully lift the clouds.

Besides the added documentation, the second focus of the new version is the project's custom kernel platform called base-hw. This kernel allows the execution of Genode on raw hardware without the need of a 3rd-party microkernel. This line of work originally started as a research vehicle for ARM platforms. But with the addition of kernel-protected capabilities, it has reached feature completeness. Furthermore, thanks to the developers of the Muen isolation kernel, base-hw has become available on the 64-bit x86 architecture. This represents an intermediate step towards running Genode on top of the Muen kernel.

Speaking of kernels, the current release introduces the principle ability to run Genode-based systems on top of the seL4 microkernel. As the name suggests, seL4 belongs to the L4-family of microkernels. But there are two things that set this kernel apart from all the other family members. First, with the removal of the kernel memory management from the kernel, it solves a fundamental robustness and security issue that plagues all other L4 kernels so far. This alone would be reason enough to embrace seL4. Second, seL4 is the world's first OS kernel that is formally proven to be correct. That means, it is void of implementation bugs. This makes the kernel extremely valuable in application areas that highly depend on the correctness of the kernel.

At the architectural level, the framework thoroughly revised its infrastructure for user-level device drivers, which subjects device drivers to a rigid access-control scheme with respect to hardware resources. The architectural changes come along with added support for message-signaled interrupts and a variety of new device drivers. For example, there is a new AHCI driver, new audio drivers ported from OpenBSD, new SD-card drivers, and added board support for i.MX6.

Further noteworthy improvements are the update of the tool chain to GCC 4.9.2, support for GPT partitions, and the ability to pass USB devices to VirtualBox when running on NOVA. These and the many more topics of the version 15.05 are covered in great detail in the release documentation.

 

Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 25th May 2015 23:11 UTC
Games

The team quickly came to the conclusion that in order to keep Dolphin relevant in an ever-changing environment, it would need to be relicensed under GPLv2+. This would give Dolphin some much needed freedom to breathe within the open source landscape. As such, relicensing formally began in September of 2014.

A massive undertaking.

 

Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 25th May 2015 23:08 UTC
Apple

Apple's Jony Ive has served as the company's Senior Vice President of Design for several years now, but Apple has announced today that the executive is being named Chief Design Officer (a newly-created position). Additionally, Ive and will be handing the managerial reins of both the industrial and software design units at Apple over to two new leaders on July 1st.

[...]

Ive's new role will still leave him in charge of the company's hardware and software design teams overall, but allowing others to handle the day-to-day affairs of each design group will free him up for other tasks. Among those other tasks, Ive says, is a focus on the design of Apple's retail stores and new campus.

Let the pointless speculation, begin.

 

Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 25th May 2015 21:34 UTC
Games

Interesting experiment by the developers of Rust.

When the game was first opened up, all players were given the same default avatar: a bald white man. With the most recent update, Rust's lead developer, Garry Newman, introduced different avatars of different racial origins into the mix. However, they did so with a twist - unlike typical massively multiplayer online role-playing games, Rust does not allow players to choose the race of their avatar. Instead, they are assigned one at random.

Interestingly enough, the inability to choose skin colour only became a problem after a black skin colour was added to the game. I love experiments like this.

 

Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 24th May 2015 21:31 UTC
Internet Explorer

Intel has been contributing to Chakra, the JavaScript engine for Microsoft Edge (and previously Internet Explorer), since 2012, bringing their expertise in web runtime development and JIT code generation. Recently, Intel expanded its efforts by contributing to the larger Microsoft Edge codebase, specifically focused in the areas of graphics and performance optimizations. Intel has been a major contributor to open source browser engines such as WebKit, Blink, and Gecko, and with our expanded collaboration, they are now directly contributing to the Microsoft Edge codebase to deliver an improved browsing experience for Windows 10.

While this is very interesting, instead of working with just a few partners, Microsoft should've just opened the code for their new rendering engine altogether. At this point, it makes little sense to keep this kind of important code closed.

When it comes to open source, the new Microsoft is only a little bit new.

 

Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 24th May 2015 21:29 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes

Enter qboot, a minimal x86 firmware that runs on QEMU and, together with a slimmed-down QEMU configuration, boots a virtual machine in 40 milliseconds on an Ivy Bridge Core i7 processor.

The code's on github.

 

Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 24th May 2015 21:26 UTC
Games

The year was 1973. They were high school seniors in a work-study program with NASA, tasked with testing the limits of the Imlac PDS-1 and PDS-4 minicomputers. Their maze program flickered into life with simple wireframe graphics and few of the trappings of modern games. You could walk around in first person, looking for a way out of the maze, and that's about it. There were no objects or virtual people. Just a maze.

But Maze would evolve over the summer and the years that followed. Soon two people could occupy the maze together, connected over separate computers. Then they could shoot each other and even peek around corners. Before long, up to eight people could play in the same maze, blasting their friends across the ARPANET - a forebear to the internet. Two decades before id Software changed the game industry with Wolfenstein 3D and Doom, Colley, Palmer and MIT students Greg Thompson and Dave Lebling invented the first-person shooter.

Amazing story.

 

Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 23rd May 2015 17:08 UTC
Legal

In a midnight session, the Senate has voted down the USA Freedom Act, putting one of the legal bedrocks of the NSA's bulk surveillance programs into jeopardy. The Patriot Act is set to expire at the end of the month, and the USA Freedom Act would have extended large portions of the act in modified form. Tonight's failure to arrive at a vote makes it likely that many of those powers will automatically expire, although Senate Majority Leader McConnell (R-KY) scheduled a last-minute session on May 31st for one last shot at passing the bill.

The American people won a battle today, but the war is far, far from over.

 

Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 23rd May 2015 17:08 UTC
Mozilla & Gecko clones

Mozilla has revamped its Firefox OS mobile software project after concluding that ultra-affordable $25 handsets aren't enough to take on the biggest powers of the smartphone world, CNET has learned.

You can make a smartphone for $35. You can't make a decent smartphone for $35. It's good Mozilla recognises this.

 

Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 22nd May 2015 19:37 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes

LiteOS is the world's most lightweight IoT OS. It is small in size at 10KB and supports zero configuration, auto-discovery, and auto-networking. It can be widely applied to different areas including smart homes, wearable, connected vehicles and other industries. The LiteOS helps to simplify the development of smart hardware to enhance IoT connectivity. In addition, Huawei announced that LiteOS will be opened to all developers, which enables them to quickly develop their own IoT products.

Meanwhile, Google is rumoured to be unveiling an IoT OS as well during IO.

 

Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 22nd May 2015 19:25 UTC
Legal

Michael Bromwich was in court with the most powerful company and the top government law agency in the country when he seemed to get antsy. Apple and the United States Department of Justice had, after all, been exchanging jabs about him. “I'd like to be heard, your Honor, if I can,” he told the judge, who said they’d need to “exhaust the arguments of the main combatants” first.

Wanting to interject would be understandable, considering how long Bromwich and Apple had been putting up their dukes inside and outside of court in a bloody fight over cash and corporate power. In July 2013, Apple was found guilty of conspiring to fix market prices for ebooks. The judge in the case, Denise Cote, said there was "a clear portrait of a conscious commitment to cross a line and engage in illegal behavior." The prosecution’s case was so clear-cut, and Apple showed such little contrition, according to Cote, that it wasn’t enough to take the company’s word that it would change. To make sure Apple fell in line, she called in help.

That would turn out to be Bromwich, a bearded, bespectacled attorney appointed by the court to be Apple’s corporate monitor for two years, a job made to ensure Apple complied with court rulings.

You rarely hear much about this kind of stuff. It seems like it's not a wise move by Apple to go against the grain of the courts this much, but then again, what do I know.

 

Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 22nd May 2015 19:17 UTC
Mac OS X

For the first time in several years, Apple is changing up its annual iOS and OS X upgrade cycle by limiting new feature additions in favor of a "big focus on quality," according to multiple sources familiar with the company's operating system development plans. We first reported in February that iOS 9, codenamed "Monarch," would heavily feature under-the-hood optimizations, and we've now learned that Apple is taking the same approach with OS X 10.11, codenamed "Gala." Sources have revealed additional new details on how Apple will optimize the new operating systems for improved stability and performance, add several new security features, and make important changes to its Swift programming tools for developers.

 

Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 22nd May 2015 13:12 UTC
Apple

Setting aside the absurdity of longtime Apple users arguing in favour of this kind of almost impenetrable complexity, John Gruber's recent piece on the behaviour of the button inside the Apple Watch's crown is telling.

Here's a better way to think about it - and without thinking about it, the reason why I think most people aren't frustrated or confused by the crown button after a week or so. It's best to think of Apple Watch as having two modes: watch mode, and app mode.

You do not need to understand this to use the watch. Most Apple Watch owners will never really think about this. But this idea of two modes is central to understanding the design of the overall interaction model.

The UI complexity problem of the Apple Watch stems from two sets of overlapping user interface elements: applications/glances and the homescreen/watch face (which are both, in turn, overlapped by the communications application and its dedicated button). For reasons that I do not understand (okay I totally understand why), the designers of the Apple Watch UI couldn't say no and couldn't make any decisions, leading to the clusterfrick of a UI it has now.

What puzzles me the most is that untangling this mess would not have been complicated - just copy the iPhone. Homescreen with application icons, and a (centered!) crown to act as a home button. Bam, done. Everything else is needless complexity, especially on such a small device you're not supposed to stare at for longer than a few seconds at a time anyway.

Gruber's piece is telling, because as a longtime Apple user, you should never need that many words to explain something that could be as elementary as the homescreen/home button combination of the iPhone. Needing this many words should raise all kinds of red flags that it's just not intuitive.

There're several reasons why it's easier to pick up an iPhone than an Android device, and the simplicity of its homescreen/home button is a big one.

 

Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 20th May 2015 23:38 UTC
Games

While AMD seems to have made up with Slightly Mad Studios, at least if this tweet from Taylor is anything to go by, the company is facing yet another supposedly GameWorks-related struggle with CD Projekt Red's freshly released RPG The Witcher 3. The game makes use of several GameWorks technologies, most notably HBAO+ and HairWorks. The latter, which adds tens of thousands of tessellated hair strands to characters, dramatically decreases frame rate performance on AMD graphics cards, sometimes by as much as 50 percent.

I got bitten by this just the other day. I'm currently enjoying my time with The Witcher III - go out and buy it, it's worth your money - but the first few hours of the game were troubled with lots of stutter and sudden framerate drops. I was stumped, because the drops didn't occur out in the open world, but only when the head of the player - a guy named Geralt - came close to the camera, or was in focus in a cutscene. It didn't make any sense, since I have one of the fancier Radeon R9 270X models, which should handle the game at the highest settings just fine.

It wasn't until a friend said "uh, you've got NVIDIA HairWorks turned off, right?" Turns out, it was set to "Geralt only". Turning it off completely solved all performance problems. It simply hadn't registered with me that this feature is pretty much entirely tied to NVIDIA cards.

While I would prefer all these technologies to be open, the cold and harsh truth is that in this case, they give NVIDIA an edge, and I don't blame them for keeping them closed - we're not talking crucial communication protocols or internet standards, but an API to render hair. I do blame the developers of The Witcher for not warning me about this. Better yet: automatically disable and/or hide NVIDIA-specific options for Radeon owners altogether. It seems like a no-brainer to prevent disgruntled consumers. Not a big deal - but still.