Linked by David Adams on Wed 27th Apr 2005 16:20 UTC
Editorial What's the easiest way to ensure that GPS tracking technology doesn't become the tool of an evil elite? Make sure everyone has access to it! For people already thinking along these lines, the availability of tracking technologies such as RFID tags and (GPS) chipsets is confirmation that we're all living in a Panopticon. The saving grace is that the CIA and the Trilateral Commission don't have a monopoly on these technologies -- maybe we can turn a world of mass observation to our benefit.
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Hmm
by Err on Wed 27th Apr 2005 16:34 UTC

What's the easiest way to ensure that GPS tracking technology doesn't become the tool of an evil elite?

So instead of just the "bad guys" being able to track your movements everybody, their dog, AND the "bad guys" can track your movements.

I may be missing some deep and subtle argument, but how does this help?

Nice
by Sebastian on Wed 27th Apr 2005 16:37 UTC

Hehe, nice read ;)
(but a rather "old" article)

Dancing???
by Jonathan Thompson on Wed 27th Apr 2005 16:50 UTC

This whole thing is more satire than anything. GPS isn't precise enough that it'd be useful for dancing lessons.

And like Err stated above, the whole premise that everyone having the tracking technology would make it all a non-issue makes absolutely no sense. Historically, if a technology can be used against people, it will usually be used against people by those with evil plans. If RFID becomes powerful enough and allows people to be sufficiently identified, I wouldn't be surprised if ads are targeted to very specific locales based on the RFID's that go by them.

I'm looking forward with a certain amount of dread to the world seeming like a much more intimate place than it is today, where everybody knows your name and habits better than you do.

The Panopticon hypothesis was wrong:
by Donny_P on Wed 27th Apr 2005 17:10 UTC

Knowing that the guards can always be watching is actually a source of comfort in a situation where the inmate has no ability to maintain normal functioning on his/her own behalf. Being locked away in isolation where nobody watches or cares is the greatest fear, especially if you're locked-up with mad-dog killer types. In a truly free society where one has the basic ability to function and socialize, one doesn't need or want the supervision. Truth is, alot of Americans are taught to feel insecure about themselves in a variety of ways, so they take comfort in the ability to observe others, (peeping tom syndrome) particularly the more media worthy types. BTW, have you looked at the boards of directors of some of these tech firms? You'll find no shortage of military, national security, or banking people here, and they do in fact belong to international groups that operate in secrecy.

Use it for real package tracking!
by MHV on Wed 27th Apr 2005 17:32 UTC

If I could make sure that anyone on earth had readily access to GPS-enabled chips, I would ask the sellers on eBay to put one in their packages so I can know where the hell the dimwits from USPS or Postes Canada lost my precious acquisitions!

Trust no one
by dvision on Wed 27th Apr 2005 18:03 UTC

Let's see...if I give away my credit card information to everyone I meet and post it on the internet, that somehow makes me more safe than if a few bad guys have it?

Uh....since when did this illogical tripe pass for news?

Answer: Oh yeah this is OSnews.

definatly
by XDelusion on Wed 27th Apr 2005 19:07 UTC

life government, free speach, the air waves, etc.

This too should be in the people's hands.

Galileo
by Evert on Wed 27th Apr 2005 20:44 UTC

which monopoly? the EU is building it's own system:

http://europa.eu.int/comm/dgs/energy_transport/galileo/index_en.htm

RE: news_id=10431
by MrE on Wed 27th Apr 2005 22:11 UTC

There will always be selfish people ready to exploit GPS for their own gain; criminals, pranksters, jealous spouses, your employer, Homeland Security. Public access to personal GPS signals will allow ANYONE TO WATCH AND FOLLOW YOU without your knowledge.
There are 2 solutions:
First, do not publish personal GPS signals.
Second, publish the GPS signal of anyone accessing your GPS signal, and also have a callback signal to alert you if anyone accesses your GPS signal.

@ MrE
by Jonathan Thompson on Wed 27th Apr 2005 22:58 UTC

Your "solutions" are flawed for symmetrical reasons:

1. You cannot keep a signal "private" by not publishing it: if it's broadcast, someone can intercept it

2. If anyone can intercept the same radio signal, they can also as readily block any signal that might be broadcast back as a callback.

So, the only solution with a guarantee that you won't be tracked by a GPS transceiver is to not have one at all!

Bicycles
by John Nilsson on Wed 27th Apr 2005 23:50 UTC

A gps-transceiver in each of my bikes... would probably have cost some por thief thier kneekaps...

re: @ MrE
by dvision on Thu 28th Apr 2005 01:15 UTC

"1. You cannot keep a signal "private" by not publishing it: if it's broadcast, someone can intercept it "

Encrypt it.

Cameras
by Brad on Thu 28th Apr 2005 02:31 UTC

Put freaking GPS in digital camera. Nothing fancy, all I want it to do is save to the data file with the picture the location and altitude of the picture, and a compass heading would be nice to, but GPS with compass is very expensive currently.

Then I could go backpacking or anyplace, click off photos, and load them up when I get home and have record of where they were taken, so I can be sure what they were off, and go back there.

Note, I don't want a freaking GPS handheld built into the camera, I just want enough to put the location in the photo, thats it, please don't turn cameras into cell phones.

@dvision
by Jonathan Thompson on Thu 28th Apr 2005 04:11 UTC

Like that'll really work! People can hack into WiFi connections and control them, if they desire, and a GPS chip doesn't require any hacking for tracking. How much space do you think something that small will have for encryption functionality? I wouldn't count on them getting that done anytime soon.

re: definatly
by Renaldo on Thu 28th Apr 2005 04:53 UTC

life government, free speach, the air waves, etc.

This too should be in the people's hands.


yes, because the United States Department of Defense is somehow obligated to provide access to its systems to everybody, including those who would use it against us.

re: Galileo
by Renaldo on Thu 28th Apr 2005 04:57 UTC

which monopoly? the EU is building it's own system:

It only took them 20 years. Maybe Europe should spend more money on useful things like this instead of throwing most of it down the bottomless pit of state welfare. I see in the news that the major European leaders are busy parading around the fact that they finally build a passenger jet that carries more people than a 35 year old 747.

Europe -- where innovation happens. heh.

Socks?
by sieb on Thu 28th Apr 2005 09:27 UTC

I would like to know where that little Dryer Gnome is hiding all my socks.. Wouldn't You?

RE: re: Galileo by Renaldo
by Moi on Thu 28th Apr 2005 09:38 UTC

Quote: "It only took them 20 years. Maybe Europe should spend more money on useful things like this instead of throwing most of it down the bottomless pit of state welfare. I see in the news that the major European leaders are busy parading around the fact that they finally build a passenger jet that carries more people than a 35 year old 747.

Europe -- where innovation happens. heh."

And Americans wonder why so many non-Americans think of them as smug arrogant morons. Dude you are doing yourself and your countrymen NO favours.

Although I do agree that state welfare is a bottomless pit!

BTW, going back to the original subject, the funniest thing that could happen IMHO would be when everybody has started using GPS for whatever purposes, the US military turn the whole system off! Haha. NICE (but then that's why the "Europeans" - have you met them, by the way, the Europeans, such nice people? Bugger of a language to learn though, Europese!)

People there is NO such thing as "The Europeans" despite what the EU powers-that-be would wish and are trying to create!

Call me crazy...
by Dr Penishead on Thu 28th Apr 2005 17:55 UTC

But I'm a little wary of anyone from IBM telling me how to avoid the
evil elite...

-Bill Penishead MD