Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 6th Mar 2007 15:40 UTC, submitted by editingwhiz
Hardware, Embedded Systems If you live in the United States, you are probably affected by a law passed by Congress in 2005 which turned the daylight savings system upside-down. Computers are, obviously, affected by this as well. Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols explains how to update your Linux computers to the new DST rules: "To make sure your Linux system knows when DST is, this year and ever on, you need to update your zoneinfo file, or replace it with one that contains the new rules." In addition, even though Apple has provided a fix for Mac OS X, this fix does not work for Macs running 10.3.9 or lower. Apple does provide a fix. This is where a freeware utility also comes into play.
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nice
by Devilotx on Tue 6th Mar 2007 16:25 UTC
Devilotx
Member since:
2005-07-06

tested all my linux machines, all up to date and ready to go for this new crazyness...

Reply Score: 1

RE: nice
by evilbastard on Wed 14th Mar 2007 13:27 UTC in reply to "nice"
evilbastard Member since:
2006-03-22

I had to patch several Win2K boxes at work, and it was a pain. I have Mandriva 2007 installed at home, and I my clock updated automatically. Maybe it was already part of the system.

Reply Score: 1

Robert Escue
Member since:
2005-07-08

I just spent the better part of two weeks patching Solaris systems (both OS and firmware) and Java for DST issues:

http://www.sun.com/bigadmin/hubs/dst/

Depending on what you are running it might or might not be an OS issue alone.

Reply Score: 2

DST Fix for Panther
by PowerMacX on Tue 6th Mar 2007 17:07 UTC
PowerMacX
Member since:
2005-11-06

"In addition, even though Apple has provided a fix for Mac OS X, this fix does not work for Macs running 10.3.9 or lower."

Actually, Apple does have a fix for Panther (10.3.x):

http://www.apple.com/support/downloads/daylightsavingtimeupdatepant...

Reply Score: 2

RE: DST Fix for Panther
by nstanosheck on Wed 7th Mar 2007 00:33 UTC in reply to "DST Fix for Panther"
nstanosheck Member since:
2006-10-10

It is only for 10.3.9, for anything before that you need to use the freeware that update 10.0.0 through 10.3.9 at http://pss-mac01.unh.edu/howto/DST_fix.html

Reply Score: 1

MS
by tspears on Tue 6th Mar 2007 17:42 UTC
tspears
Member since:
2006-05-22

Patching the windows servers at work was hell! Especially if you are like us and still running some 2000 machines. MS is charging about 4500 USD for the patch, or you have to buy the extended support for 2000. Naturally, no one wants to pay that... Realizing this MS put out some tools to help automate the process but none of it works as it is supposed to. and I'm not even going to get into the hell outlook calendars were to update...

Edited 2007-03-06 17:42

Reply Score: 2

RE: MS
by IanSVT on Tue 6th Mar 2007 18:12 UTC in reply to "MS"
IanSVT Member since:
2005-07-06

I've got three cisco boxes running callmanager(2) and unity(1). They run on Windows Server 2000. I'm just going to be manually jogging the time forward on them. I haven't been able to get a straight answer and cisco's docs are a cludge.

Other than that, most of my Windows workstations are updated, my NetWare boxes, my linux servers, and my Server 2003 boxes are all as well. I've done my GroupWise updates. The only thing I have to do is run the DST GroupWise repair utility for calenders and fix on the servers that run it.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: MS
by Phloptical on Wed 7th Mar 2007 01:03 UTC in reply to "RE: MS"
Phloptical Member since:
2006-10-10

Nothing is more kuldge than MS's "fix". I don't know who to be more pissed at......congress for enacting this ridiculous law, or Microsoft for knowing about it for 2 years and yet sticking us with a statement like "apply all patches in rapid succession." What bunk!

I still want it explained to me why a patch for outlook, or exchange's calendar is needed when both the desktop and server OS is patched. That makes no sense. The time of the appointment is relative to the system clock.

Reply Score: 3

Ubuntu's fine
by Constantine XVI on Tue 6th Mar 2007 17:43 UTC
Constantine XVI
Member since:
2006-11-02

I asked in the #ubuntu+1 this morning, and it is fixed in feisty. They also said that patches were either pushed or ready for dapper and edgy, but I cant say, since I run feisty

Reply Score: 1

RE: Ubuntu's fine
by archiesteel on Wed 7th Mar 2007 02:50 UTC in reply to "Ubuntu's fine"
archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

I checked Edgy this weekend, and the update had already been applied.

Reply Score: 2

JoeBuck
Member since:
2006-01-11

Just use apt-get (Debian based) or yum (Fedora) to get the updates.

Reply Score: 2

Just curious?
by vondur on Tue 6th Mar 2007 18:32 UTC
vondur
Member since:
2005-07-07

If your systems are syncing against a ntp server, wont they be ok? (provided you are syncing against a trustworthy one)

Reply Score: 3

RE: Just curious?
by Robert Escue on Tue 6th Mar 2007 18:36 UTC in reply to "Just curious?"
Robert Escue Member since:
2005-07-08

If they are patched yes, if not who knows. In the timezone data for each OS, Java and some applications is information about when DST starts and stops. If you have not patched your systems and March 11 comes around, despite what the NTP server says, your machine(s) might respond with "April 1 is the start of DST" and ingore the NTP update.

The only way to be sure is patch and test.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Just curious?
by echo.ranger on Tue 6th Mar 2007 19:01 UTC in reply to "Just curious?"
echo.ranger Member since:
2007-01-17

No, because NTP works on UTC time. Your OS will still make the DST adjustments based on your timezone.

Even if you use NTP, you still need to patch your /usr/share/zoneinfo files (or manually adjust the time on 3/11 and 4/1, then again on 10/28 and 11/4).

Reply Score: 4

Thank you George W...
by brewmastre on Tue 6th Mar 2007 19:44 UTC
brewmastre
Member since:
2006-08-01

For signing into law such a ridiculous change! At work we have had to patch WinNT, 2k, XP, 2k3, Linux, OS/400, AIX, Exchange, Windows Mobile, and Blackberry's all for some strange experiment. I can't wait until they decide that it was a pointless test and change it back in a year or two.

But on a positive note, that was a very nice straight-forward How-to.

Reply Score: 2

They turned it around?
by Darkelve on Tue 6th Mar 2007 19:44 UTC
Darkelve
Member since:
2006-02-06

Well, I'm not from U.S. But I do wonder: Why exactly did they change it? Environmental/energy issues? Biological/health reasons? Something other reason?

Just curious.

Reply Score: 4

v RE: They turned it around?
by tmanop2006 on Tue 6th Mar 2007 19:56 UTC in reply to "They turned it around?"
RE: They turned it around?
by echo.ranger on Tue 6th Mar 2007 19:59 UTC in reply to "They turned it around?"
echo.ranger Member since:
2007-01-17

Because they were bored and noticed it hadn't changed much in the last 20 years?

Truthfully, they claim its to reduce energy consumption. Some statistic I read stated it is supposed to reduce the US dependency on 150,000 barrels of oil throughout the year. The worst part is there is a footnote in the bill that gives Congress the option to reverse the change in the next year or two if the gain doesn't prove worthy.

I wonder how much of that "gain" is now lost with all the IT departments that have to spend time updating DST files on servers.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: They turned it around?
by tmanop2006 on Tue 6th Mar 2007 20:07 UTC in reply to "RE: They turned it around?"
tmanop2006 Member since:
2006-10-10

I posted a similar response, but they pulled it because of a word I used. But essentially, it's Bush's way of taking focus off the war. They say it will save the US millions in fuel costs, but it's costing businesses billions in lost time, etc...

Reply Score: 0

RE[3]: They turned it around?
by chmeee on Wed 7th Mar 2007 00:44 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: They turned it around?"
chmeee Member since:
2006-01-10

Wrong. Bush doesn't have the power to make laws, only to pass or veto them.

Reply Score: 3

v RE[4]: They turned it around?
by tmanop2006 on Wed 7th Mar 2007 13:19 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: They turned it around?"
RE[5]: They turned it around?
by chmeee on Wed 7th Mar 2007 22:25 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: They turned it around?"
chmeee Member since:
2006-01-10

You are correct, I used incorrect terminology, it should have been "bill" not "law". You are, however, incorrect in your assumption of me being a Republican, although I am likely closer to the right than most people here.

If you read other posts here, some like the change, others hate it, and that's how it is with most new laws. This one is especially annoying because of all the technology changes that must be made, and the reversion clause poses even more of a problem, since the changes may need to be reverted in the next couple years.

However, this could benefit us if it sticks, and that is what this trial run is for.

Reply Score: 1

Another solution
by DHofmann on Tue 6th Mar 2007 20:39 UTC in reply to "RE: They turned it around?"
DHofmann Member since:
2005-08-19

If they wanted to reduce energy consumption, all they'd have to do is stop subsidizing oil. They say this would raise the price of gasoline to somewhere between $5 and $15 a gallon. Then people would voluntarily conserve. Google "true cost of gasoline" for more info.

Reply Score: 2

I am looking forward to it
by Seth Quarrier on Tue 6th Mar 2007 20:08 UTC
Seth Quarrier
Member since:
2005-11-13

I have to say that I am looking forward to this, although I don't work in IT so it doesn't effect my adversely, but in general DST is far more pleasent then non-DST. Having long lighted afternoons is a very nice thing. I hate it when it gets dark well before I would think of going to bed. Personally I think it should be DST all year long. I would far perfer to get up in the dark and have an enjoyable afternoon then miss a second of precious winter sun.

ps. This may be the one bill that Bush has signed that I wholeheartedly agree with.

Edited 2007-03-06 20:09

Reply Score: 4

v RE: I am looking forward to it
by Phloptical on Wed 7th Mar 2007 01:13 UTC in reply to "I am looking forward to it"
RE: I am looking forward to it
by phoenix on Wed 7th Mar 2007 07:42 UTC in reply to "I am looking forward to it"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

I've always found "Daylight Savings" time to be backward. It's never made sense to me why we want it to be light out at 11pm.

We should be pushing the clocks back in the spring (look, it's light out in the morning, and dark at 10pm) and forward in the fall (look it's light out in the morning, and dark around 7pm).

Instead, during the summer, it's light out until almost midnight, and in the winter it's dark when we wake and dark when we leave work. Yeah, great way to save daylight there.

The whole point of timezones is so that the position of the sun is almost always the same at the same "time" wherever you go. So why not implement "daylight savings" to make the "daylight" part of the day the same throughout the year? Makes a lot more sense to me.

We are not an agricultural, daylight-dependent society. It's time to drop these agricultural, daylight-dependent anachronisms.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: I am looking forward to it
by jal_ on Wed 7th Mar 2007 14:25 UTC in reply to "RE: I am looking forward to it"
jal_ Member since:
2006-11-02

"We are not an agricultural, daylight-dependent society. It's time to drop these agricultural, daylight-dependent anachronisms."

DST was introduced to conserve energy, as many people on this thread have reminded us, and has nothing to do with daylight-dependment or agriculture. The idea is that during summer, it gets light really early (when most people are still sound asleep), but gets dark when most people are still awake (and thus will turn on the lights). When shifting for an hour, you would save the energy needed for light for one hour. You can't just shift that hour permanently, since during winter, it would get dark even sooner than it does now, so the clock is turned back then. Of course, one could argue whether in a modern time with everyone having computers and other energy consuming home appliences running 24/7, the energy consumption of your average light bulb really matters that much.

Reply Score: 1

phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

It's still backwards, especially in the winter. It's dark when you wake up, it's dark when you are preparing for work, it's dark when you get to work (for those that work at 8 or 9 in most places), it's dark when you leave work (for those that work until 5-ish), it's dark when you get home. Where's the savings there? The lights are on all day.

If we moved the clocks ahead in the winter, then it would still be dark in the morning, but it would be light out for an hour or so after work. Seems we'd save a lot more power that way.

And if we moved the clocks back in the summer, it would actually be dark at night, like it's supposed to be. I can't stand trying to sleep when it's still daylight out after 11pm.

Reply Score: 2

DST
by protagonist on Wed 7th Mar 2007 02:23 UTC
protagonist
Member since:
2005-07-06

The first command works to display the settings under OS X and PCBSD. Both of which have already been properly patched.

And it never ceases to amaze me how some people will try and turn anything into some kind of political conspiracy.

Reply Score: 2

Way off topic
by re_re on Wed 7th Mar 2007 14:51 UTC
re_re
Member since:
2005-07-06

Ok, I think it's time to get back on topic, this is not a political debate board, i could legitimately mod 50% of the posts down in here for being off topic although i have not done so.

Now, back on topic, the bottom line is that like it or not, the new DST has been implimented and you really don't have much choice but to conform to it. On my apple box and kubuntu boxes this was simply a standard update. I haven't messed with it on my windows box yet but heh.... it sounds like loads of fun from the posts I have read.

Reply Score: 3

DST sucks
by Edward on Wed 7th Mar 2007 16:20 UTC
Edward
Member since:
2005-09-17

Why don't they just get rid of DST?

Reply Score: 1

patchless
by JrezIN on Wed 7th Mar 2007 16:33 UTC
JrezIN
Member since:
2005-06-29

Not sure, but the problem most North Americans are facing now, isn't new. They're facing this now. New dates for DST settings, but around the world, many countries doesn't have a 'fixed date' for DST settings... instead, every year they announce this year's DST dates.

I really don't like the way OSes really on patches instead of 'settings' to understand different DST dates/settings. With internet, a simple feed with this settings would work much better. Some kind of database (update able) to understand previous DST settings would work better than the current "workarounds"...

I just hope engineers do realize that re-designing something may be the better option to fulfill everyones needs in this case...

Why? Just see everyone that had DST problems before... I have not EVER past a year with wrong DST settings... like DST starting a week before or after the correct one. That's probably not something new for the ones who don't live in USA...

Reply Score: 2

WIndows 2000 systems.
by vondur on Thu 8th Mar 2007 16:37 UTC
vondur
Member since:
2005-07-07

Funny that Microsoft is not releasing a patch for Win2k systems unless you pay for it. Offtopic: I am happy for the extra daylight after work. I can now do Mountain Bike rides after work without having to do night rides!

Reply Score: 2